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index 




second halt- vol. 5 



JULY THROUGH 
DECEMBER 1951 

Issued every six months 



Advertising Agencies 

How good is your account executive?- 13 Aug. p. 36 

Why so many sponsors are changing agencies __ 27 Aug. p. 23 

Frank Delano, Foote, Cone & Belding, profile 8 Oct. p. 60 

Elizabeth Black, Joseph Katz Co., profile 22 Oct. p. 56 

Lawrence Valenstein, Grey Advertising profile 5 Nov. p. 54 

Timebuyers are agency's forgotten men 19 Nov. p. 34 

James M. Cecil, Cecil & Presbrey, profile 19 Nov. p. 58 

A day in the life of an account executive.. 3 Dec. p. 27 

Barry Ryan, Ruthrauff & Ryan, profile 3 Dec. p. 58 

Ray Vir Den, Lennen & Mitchell, profile 17 Dec. p. 54 

Milton Biow, Biow Company, profile .... 31 Dec. p. 56 

Automotive and Lubricants 

Auto firms on the air, forecast 16 July p. 33 

Shell Oil, Atlantic Refining air strategies.. 16 July p. 34 

Conoco strikes oil with spot radio and TV 13 Aug. p. 28 

WMAY d.j. sells used cars via new approach 13 Aug. p. 55 

Brian Rootes, Rootes Motors, profile 27 Aug. p. 18 

WHIO-TV swap shop triples tire recap business 27 Aug. p. 32 

Auto-Lite spends ?1,500,000 on AM/TV mysteries 8 Oct. p. 40 
H. M. Warren, National Carbon Co. (Prestone 

anti-freeze), profile 22 Oct. p. 22 

Rayco (auto seat covers) profits by air errors. .... 19 Nov. p. 36 

Forum: How can new car dealers best use air? .... 19 Nov. p. 50 

Goodyear Tire sponsors biblical drama on TV 17 Dec. p. 24 

Broadcast Advertising Problems and 
Developments 

Radio stations assert strength of AM.. 2 July p. 17 

"Radio weak in selling itself": Kobak 2 July p. 26 

Outlook for advertisers in network radio 16 July p. 44 

Network radio circulation facts and figures. 16 July p. 44 

What does network radio cost? 16 July p. 50 

Trend toward flexibility in net radio 16 July p. 55 

Spot radio: facts and figures .. 16 July p. 65 

FM radio: fall 1951 outlook _ 16 July p. 95 

Transit Radio: fall 1951 outlook 16 July p. 96 

Storecasling yields satisfied sponsors 16 July p. 100 

Regional networks prosper 16 July p. 105 

Forum: How can radio better sell itself? 16 July p. 176 

New broadcast codes and censorship _ 16 July p. 187 

California broadcasters make radio sales pitch 30 July p. 18 

New low cost of network radio 30 July p. 21 

Stuart Chase's 1928 prophecy on radio 30 July p. 32 

Broadcast sales group stresses flexibility 13 Aug. p. 20 

Why radio will thrive in a TV era T 10 Sept. p. 25 

Why sponsors are returning to radio 24 Sept. p. 27 

Are networks encroaching on spot radio? 24 Sept. p. 34 

SCBA presents case for California radio 24 Sept. p. 40 

The truth about Red Channels: I 8 Oct. p. 27 

Tape recorder is revolutionizing AM programing 8 Oct. p. 32 

The truth about Red Channels: II .... 22 Oct. p. 30 

NBC's new radio plan 22 Oct. p. 32 

Today's AM-TV clinics do real job 22 Oct. p. 35 

How to keep Reds off the air — sanely: III 5 Nov. p. 32 

How many NBC milestones can you remember?.... 19 Nov. p. 38 

Radio networks are being reborn _. 3 Dec. p. 38 

Let your salesmen in on your advertising 17 Dec. p. 27 

New network merchandising era ... 17 Dec. p. 32 

Do cigarette claims hurt all air advertising? 17 Dec. p. 34 

Clothing 

Samuel Sennet, Howard Clothes Corp., profile .... 19 Nov. p. 16 
Forum: Can men's apparel be sold effectively on 

radio and TV? 3 Dec. p. 48 

Codes and Censorship 

Government censorship possibility; NBC code... 16 July p. 187 

Be careful on the air; radio censorship: I 10 Sept. p. 30 

TV introduces new censorship anxieties: II _ 24 Sept. p. 36 

The truth about Red Channels: I 8 Oct. p. 27 

The truth about Red Channels: II 22 Oct. p. 30 

New TV code proposed by NARTB 5 Nov. p. 27 

How to keep Reds off the air — sanely: III 5 Nov. p. 32 

Do cigarette claims hurt all air advertising? ... 17 Dec. p. 34 



Commercials and Sales Aids 

Schwerin pre-tests radio/TV commercials 2 July p. 28 

Fall 1951 trends in radio/TV commercials 16 July p. 12 

Singing commercials have potent sales punch 16 July p. 85 

Petry device previews TV shows, pitches 30 July p. 45 

Transfilm briefs admen on film commercials: I 13 Aug. p. 34 

Forum: Do "best-liked" commercials sell best?. . 13 Aug. p. 48 

Transfilm gives lowdown on film commercials: II 10 Sept. p. 39 

How to be a dud at writing radio commercials .... 8 Oct. p. 38 

The jingle that built Carolina Rice _ 22 Oct. p. 40 

So you think you own your own jingle? 5 Nov. p. 35 

How to blend film-commercial techniques 19 Nov. p. 40 

Do viewers remember your TV commercial? 3 Dec. p. 32 

Station breaks pack punch in few seconds 3 Dec. p. 40 

Confections and Soft Drinhs 

Coca-Cola, Canada Dry air strategies 16 July p. 34 

Mars top user of air media among candy firms ... 16 July p. 37 

H. W. Guppy, Planters Nut & Choc. Co. profile 30 July p. 16 

Cliquot Club sold by TV ventriloquist, dummy.— 8 Oct. p. 56 

How kid TV show sold Coca-Cola 19 Nov. p. 24 

Contests and Offers 

Trends in contests and premium offers 16 July p. 169 

How sponsors profit with premiums: I 13 Aug. p. 32 

Sponsors cash in on kid premiums: II 27 Aug. p. 28 

How to run a premium promotion: III 10 Sept. p. 34 

Flamingo premium offer reaps record returns 17 Dec. p. 50 

Beer sponsor profits from "Disk Jockey Contest" 31 Dec. p. 54 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

How drug firms are using the air _ 16 July p. 33 

Tintair, Hazel Bishop rose with use of radio/TV 16 Julv p. 36 

Chap Stick wins male trade via spot radio 30 July p. 24 

J. Sanford Rose, Rhodes Pharmacal, profile 13 Aug. p. 18 

Vick Chemical uses Canadian radio 27 Aug. o. 53 

Elmer H. Bobst, Warner-Hudnut, profile 8 Oct. p. 22 

Frank Clancy, Miles California Co., profile 5 Nov. p. 20 

Rybutol zooms to No. 1 vitamin spot via air 19 Nov. p. 30 

Jack S. Hewitt, Anahist Co., profile _ 3 Dec. p. 20 

Serutan climbed to top with radio/TV 17 Dec. p. 30 

Farm Radio 

Big response to WOW-promoted farm study tour 2 July p. 43 

Oyster Shell uses spot radio to reach farmers 3 Dec. p. 30 

WGY celebrates 25 years of farm airers 3 Dec. p. 52 

Food and Beverages 

M. H. Robinson, Monarch Wine Co., profile 2 July p. 16 

Ruppert, Pabst, Piel's lean on radio/TV 16 July p. 35 

Mueller's, National Biscuit air strategies 16 July p. 35 

Continental, Quality Bakers find radio/TV works 16 July p. 36 

Carnation, Borden put radio/TV to work 16 July p. 37 

Nedicks revives sales with spot radio 27 Aug. p. 26 

Radio/TV help Ruppert from red ink to black 27 Aug. p. 32 

Kellogg Co. uses Canadian radio 27 Aug. p. 63 

Barbara Collyer, Welch Grape Juice Co., profile 10 Sept. p. 20 

Quaker Oats resumes AM schedule, continues TV 24 Sept. p. 30 

Carolina Rice builds radio campaign on jingle... 22 Oct. p. 40 

K. J. Forbes, Bovril of America, profile 17 Dec. p. 20 

Flamingo offers premium, reaps record returns ... 17 Dec. p. 50 

H. E. Picard, San Francisco Brewing Corp., profile 31 Dec. p. 12 

Seabrook switches to own frozen food brand 31 Dec. p. 30 

Foreign Radio 

U. S. advertisers hit pay dirt in Alaska 2 July p. 17 

How to sell foreign language market 16 July p. 102 

Radio advertising outside U. S. __ 16 July p. 104 

Alert advertisers slant pitch to foreign groups. ... 27 Aug. p. 20 

Canada: the market 27 Aug. p. 38 

Canada: radio facts and figures 27 Aug. p. 40 

Canada: tips to radio advertisers 27 Aug. p. 48 

Canada: how successful air advertisers operate _ 27 Aug. p. 52 

Forum: What Canada air offers U. S. sponsors ... 27 Aug. p. 56 



insurance and Finance 

Wellington Fund gets new investors via radio.— 2 July p. 42 

Banks can do better on radio/TV 10 Sept. p. 32 

Radio ups sales 400% for insurance firm 19 Nov. p. 54 

iff ail Order and Per Inquiry 

Mail order strong on AM, weaker on TV 16 July p. 184 

Per inquiry deals being discouraged 16 July p. 184 

Rayex Nite Glasses win with radio mail order 8 Oct. p. 30 

Merchandising 

Merchandising aid offered by nets, stations 16 July p. 185 

Big-city stations swing to merchandising 13 Aug. p. 25 

"Radio Dollars" merchandising-premium plan 5 Nov. p. 48 

Rybutol uses high-pressure merchandising 19 Nov. p. 30 

Networks offer new" merchandising benefits 17 Dec. p. 32 

Forum: If the radio networks go in for merchan- 
dising, what services would most benefit ad- 
vertisers? 31 Dec. p. 52 

Miscellaneous Products and Services 

Harold L. Schafer, Gold Seal Co., profile... 16 July p. 22 

Why sporting goods neglect the air.. 30 July p. 29 

Mausoleum sells crypts via radio 13 Aug. p. 54 

Ronson uses Canadian radio 27 Aug. p. 62 

Reynolds Metals makes friends on local level 10 Sept. p. 28 

G. N. Coughlan, G. N. Coughlan Co., profile 24 Sept. p. 14 

Hudson Pulp & Paper buys back into spot AM.. 24 Sept. p. 28 

Radio turned tide for Rayex Nite Glasses 8 Oct. p. 30 

Longines-Wittnauer dignified programing sells ... 5 Nov. p. 30 

Why Cannon Mills turned to radio and TV 5 Nov. p. 36 

Oyster Shell feed firm thrives on spot AM 3 Dec. p. 30 

Singer Sewing Machines' happy radio/TV trial.... 31 Dec. p. 36 

Programing, General 

Morning men prove sponsor bonanza _ 2 July p. 19 

Forum: How will net radio programing change? 2 July p. 40 

Programing trends in network radio 16 July p. 50 

Spot radio programing trends 16 July p. 72 

Network co-op programs pick up billings..... 16 July p. 92 

More sponsors using transcribed syndicated shows 16 July p. 88 

Music libraries offer low-cost programs 16 July p. 94 

After-midnight radio yields sales successes 30 July p. 26 

Canadian radio programing 27 Aug. p. 49 

Science fiction hot bet on radio/TV 10 Sept. p. 36 

Who is to blame for stereotyped programing? 10 Sept. p. 44 

Ice Follies uses radio one-shots effectively 10 Sept. p. 50 

Ziv transcribed comedy series attracts sponsors 10 Sept. p. 51 
Forum: Will "live" radio decline to be replaced 

by more transcribed shows? 24 Sept. p. 52 

Mysteries on AM and TV pay off for Auto-Lite ... 8 Oct. p. 40 

How to remake an AM drama for TV 22 Oct. p. 38 

Political one-shot pays off for WIP sponsor 22 Oct. p. 55 

Dignified musical programing sells for Longines 5 Nov. p. 30 

Why blame the program director? 3 Dec. p. 34 

Does controversy spur sales? 31 Dec. p. 34 

Radio hypnosis proves sales-winning stunt on KYA 31 Dec. p. 54 

Programing, Television 

Trends in spot TV programing 16 July p. 140 

Network TV co-op shows gain sponsors 16 July p. 142 

Program trends in network TV 16 July p. 152 

Alternate week TV programing ... 16 July p. 159 

TV film programing, trends, firms 16 July p. 171 

Viewer gripes are tip-off to better TV programs ... 13 Aug. p. 30 

First daytime TV soap opera put on film 27 Aug. p. 20 

Science fiction rockets to radio/TV popularity 10 Sept. p. 36 

TV disk jockey packs potent sales punch 10 Sept. p. 50 

Daytime TV program preferences 8 Oct. p. 37 

"Suspense" on TV and AM pays off for Auto-Lite 8 Oct. p. 40 

How "Mr. District Attorney" was remade for TV 22 Oct. p. 38 

Forum: Programing music effectively on TV 22 Oct. p. 46 

Public Utilities 

Bell Telephone's regional firms use spot AM/TV 2 July p. 24 

How electric companies use air nationally: I 19 Nov. p. 32 

Electric, gas utilities like spot radio/TV: II 3 Dec. p. 36 

Research 

Schwerin pretests programs and commercials 2 July p. 28 

New ARBI findings on newspaper vs. radio 16 July p. 24 

Radio Basics: a charted compendium of statisti- 
cal information about radio, its audience, pro- 
grams, costs, billings 16 July p. 107 

Radio and TV research trends, organizations 16 July p. 164 



Basic research techniques and weakness, chart .... 

Radio vs. TV in Tulsa _ 

Market tests help chart sales expectancy 

Out-of-home listening evidence grows 

Forum: Should radio/TV ratings be expressed in 

number of homes reached? 

Radio listening in Midwest: spring 1951.. 

Bigger and better BMB-type study on way 

CBS-NBC study measures individual listening 

How BAB will serve sponsors in 1952. 

New BAB station sales tool _... 

How is radio doing in TV homes? 

Retail 

Department stores test radio vs. newspapers.- 

Spot radio pours customers into Nedicks stores ... 

Furniture stores on the air 

How radio can sell retailers better: Joe Ward 

Exciting radio pitches build supermarket traffic... 

Forum: Can men's apparel be sold effectively on 

radio and TV? 



16 July 


P- 


165 


10 Sept. 


P- 


22 


24 Sept. 


P- 


38 


5 Nov. 


P- 


36 


5 Nov. 


p. 


46 


19 Nov. 


P- 


27 


3 Dec. 


P. 


39 


3 Dec. 


P- 


39 


17 Dec. 


P. 


37 


17 Dec. 


P- 


51 


31 Dec. 


p. 


25 


16 July 


P. 


24 


27 Aug. 


p. 


26 


8 Oct. 


P- 


42 


22 Oct. 


p. 


36 


19 Nov. 


P- 


54 



3De 



p. 48 



Soaps, Cleansers, Toilet Goods 

Air media get much of Rinso, Bab-0 budgets.... 

Lever Bros, uses Canadian radio 

Procter & Gamble uses Canadian radio 

Bab-0 bounces back with new air approach 22 Oct. 

Bristol-Myers remakes "Mr. D.A." for TV 

Sports 

TV and sports: many hurdles to clear 

Grocery chain courts men with sports show _ 

Forum: Will promoters curtail sports sponsorship 

because of TV's effect on the boxoffice? 

Sports sponsorship developments in Fall, 1951 

Television 

TV Dictionary/Handbook, D-L 

Spot TV: rates, costs, availabilities, who uses 

Network TV: circulation, costs, availabilities, pro- 
gram trends, leading clients, agencies 

Kinescope recording trends 

Theatre and subscriber TV, forecast 

How to cut TV program, commercial costs 

TV union problems 

TV Dictionary /Handbook, L-R 

Network vs. spot TV for filmed shows 

TV Dictionary/Handbook, R-Z 

Forum: How can low-budget advertiser use TV? 

More rural families own TV sets _ 

What TV viewers gripe about 

What TV has learned about economy 

Don't lose out on daytime TV 

Do viewers remember your TV commercial? 

Forum: How soon will morning TV become im- 
portant to national and regional sponsors? 

TV commercials: Four cartoons 

Timebuying 

Early morning hours good bet for sponsors 

What does network radio cost? . 

Spot radio time rates 

Trends in spot timebuying 

Tips on fall 1951 timebuying 
Network radio becomes good buy 

After-midnight radio: low-priced effective 

What's your TV choice: net or spot? 

TV for the low-budget advertiser 

Don't lose out on daytime TV 

"Flowchart" simplifies air buying 

Timebuyers: underpaid, underplayed, overworked 

Are you overlooking station breaks? 

Weed cost breakdown eases spot TV buying 
Forum: How soon will morning TV become im- 
portant to sponsors? 

Tobacco 

How cigarette firms use the air 

Do cigarette claims hurt all air advertising? 



16 July 


p. 


33 


27 Aug. 


P- 


64 


27 Aug. 


p. 


65 


22 Oct. 


p. 


27 


22 Oct. 


P- 


•38 


16 July 


p. 


181 


10 Sept. 


p. 


50 


8 Oct. 


P- 


48 


3 Dec. 


p. 


38 


2 July 


P. 


31 


16 July 


P. 


137 


16 July 


p. 


149 


16 July 


p. 


158 


16 July 


P- 


181 


16 July 


P- 


182 


16 July 


p. 


185 


16 July 


P- 


190 


30 July 


P. 


30 


30 July 


P- 


34 


30 July 


p. 


38 


13 Aug. 


p. 


20 


13 Aug. 


p. 


30 


24 Sept. 


P- 


32 


8 Oct. 


P. 


34 


3 Dec. 


P- 


32 


17 Dec. 


p. 


46 


31 Dec. 


P- 


32 


2 July 


p. 


19 


16 July 


P- 


50 


16 July 


P- 


68 


16 July 


P- 


82 


16 July 


n. 


198 


30 July 


P- 


22 


30 July 


P- 


26 


30 Julv 


P- 


30 


30 July 


!'• 


38 


8 Oct. 


P- 


34 


5 Nov. 


P. 


40 


19 Nov. 


P. 


34 


3 Dec. 


P. 


40 


17 Dec. 


P. 


38 



17 Dec. p. 46 



Transcriptions 

Transcribed programs, use of, costs, popularity... 
What library services offer 

Ziv comedy series attracts many sponsors 

Forum: Will transcribed shows replace live? 

Tape recorder is revolutionizing AM programing 



16 July 


P- 


32 


17 Dec. 


P- 


34 


16 July 


P- 


88 


16 July 


P- 


89 


10 Sept. 


P- 


51 


24 Sept. 


p. 


52 


8 Oct. 


p. 


32 



ULY 1951 • 50c Per Copy $8.00 a Year 

-: v . 



NA 1 IUINAL BHUAUliAd 1 !N« UUWirK ilW 
GENERAL LIBRARY 

.o rockefeller Kobak:T<^t &ors aren't 
really down on idio — p. 26 

You've got to wake up early to outsell these red hots — see p. 4 

SP 10-4-i 12220 
MISS FRANCES <" PRAGUE 
NATIONAL BROADCASTING 
30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA 
M £ W YOTK 20 N Y 



nepur 




New and 
Renew 

page 13 

Mr. Sponsor: 
Meyer H. 
! Robinson 

page 16 

Wake-Up 
Time Pro- 
graming 

page 19 

How Bell 
Companies 
Use Spot 




page 42 



Editorials 



page b A 




THE STARS THAT SHINE 
AT MORNING-TIME . . . 




6:45 & 7:45 A.M. 
NEWS 

WIS Newscaster Bob 

lyle presents complete 

roundups of the news at 6:45 

and 7:45 A.M. All news gathered 

from the extensive wire services leased 

by WLS. Both News periods have enjoyed a 

wide and loyal following based on accuracy, 

impartiality and completeness of presentation. 




7:00 A.M. 
BUCCANEERS 



National Barn Dance 

favorites, Captain Stubby 

and the Buccaneers, offer music, 

comedy and sparkling songs as part 

of the breakfast menu. This group last 

year appeared before nearly 200,000 people 

in personal appearances. 



7:15 A.M. 
BOB ATCHER 

The Midwest's favor- 
ite cowboy, Bob Atcher, 
Top Hand of the Cowhands'' 
weaves a pattern of songs long en- 
joyed by Midwest listeners. Popular with 
listeners through years of radio association, 
Bob is also one of TV's bright stars, having won a 
special plaque in a recent popularity poll. 



*)U 'pavwUte WLS StaM 

...AND LISTENERS BECOME OU 
ADVERTISERS' CUSTOMERS! 

The Midwest's favorite WLS stars shine at morning-time! Daily fror 

5 :00 to 8 :00 A.M. the successful WLS formula of block programming with l\\ 

talent shows attracts listeners from every corner of the WLS-Midwest coverag 

area. Featuring stars of the NATIONAL BARN DANCE, these mornir. 

programs have consistently maintained a degree of leadership as reflects 

in A. C. Nielsen's 1950 Station Area Reports, which place WLS first fs 

second in audience during each 15-minute period! 

This leadership again demonstrates the degree of acceptance enjoyei 

by WLS . . . the listener-loyalty Midwesterners have toward th 

station, its programs and personalities. 

... In Terms Of Results 

Using these WLS morning time periods: brougl 

nearly a million and a half box tops from WLS listener 

to a cereal company over a period of 16 years ... re 

suited in over 5,000 proof-of-purchase requests fo 

an ironing board cover offered by a starch mam 

facturer last summer in a six week period. A 

offer of a Dolph Hewitt record for prize joke 

brought over 3,000 letters in three weeks! I 

mail order account sold $13,959 worth c 

its product in just five weeks! 

It's a "must"' that you consider WL 

morning-time in your plans for com 

plete Midwest coverage. Participa 

tions are still available in limite 

numbers. Your John Blair man ha 

complete details. 





7:30 A.M. 
DOLPH HEWITT 

RCA Victor Record- 
ing star, Dolph Hewitt, 
offers a unique style of sing- 
ing enthusiastically accepted by Mid- 
west listeners. Backed by the WIS Sage 
Riders, Dolph rounds out the 15-minute show 
with smooth singing and melodious renditions of all 
time favorites. 




KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, AMERICAN AFFILIATE. 




PR OGRAMS THIS FALL ON NETWORKS WILL ZOOM DOWN IN COST — Bulk of NBC pro- 
grams this fall will cost sponsor less than $5,000 weekly, lower than in many- 
years. CBS, Mutual, ABC as well are winnowing schedules, emphasising novelty and 
low cost. Atmosphere at net programing departments is definitely experimental. 
Lester Gottlieb, CBS radio programs director, told SPONSOR: "We are willing to 
gamble as long as these new ideas help stimulate the greatest of advertising medi- 
ums." (For fall predictions from program men of all 4 nets, see page 40.) 

HUDSON OFFER IS DESIG NED TO T EST RADIO IN TV MARKETS — Those Hudson Pulp and 
Paper mail pulls you've been hearing about are part of firm's analysis of radio 
effectiveness in TV markets. On heels of whopping WOR, New York, mail count, WFIL, 
Philadelphia, scored total of 5,729 cards and letters as result of single announce- 
ment. On first day after pitch, 3,500 pieces were received. Firm offered 4 cou- 
pons exchangeable for 4 boxes of napkins. Early-morning d.j. LeRoy Miller made 
offer at 7:15 a.m. 

YOU'LL BE HEARING FROM NARTSR'S MURRAY CRABHORN — There ' s plenty of activity 
ahead for Murray Grabhorn who takes over today (2 July) as managing director of 
National Association of Radio and Television Station Representatives. Dozen proj- 
ects have been lined up for him, including research on average cost of spot radio 
over past 10 years — compared with average cost of other commodities and rise in 
radio's circulation. Like his predecessor Tom Flanagan, who was always in thick 
of spot radio/TV's promotional battle till illness enforced his withdrawal, Grab- 
horn will make plenty of statements, service advertisers with information about 
spot . 

DAYTIME TV AUDIENCc MAY HAVE REACHED ITS PEAK — Seymour Smith, Advertest re- 
search director, believes daytime TV audience may have passed its peak percentage- 
wise. He points to recent Advertest study which shows that daytime audience in- 
creased by less than one-third between 1950- '51 while at same time set ownership 
increased by one-half. Other important discoveries of study were: (1) daytime TV 
exhibits no novelty effect, with long-time owners watching more than short-timers; 
(2) average daytime viewer spends 10 hours weekly (Mon.-Fri.) viewing between 9:00 
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. ; (3) if non-viewers so desire, they can find time to watch dur- 
ing day. 

CROSLEY INCENTIVE PLAN SYMPTOMATIC OF STEPPED-UP SELLING BY RADIO/TV— 

Crosley Broadcasting's "Operation Sunburst" is first sales incentive plan in 
firm's history. Salesmen who sell most time this summer (proportionate to their 
opportunities) get prises, including 2-week vacation in West Indies. Contest is 
symptomatic of stepped-up selling philosophy now permeating many radio stations. In 
this case, TV comes in for equal plugging to combat hiatus drop-off on WLW-T-C-D. 



SPONSOR, Volume 5. No. 14. 2 July 1951. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications. Inc.. at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md. Executive. Editorial. Circulation Office 
510 Madison Ave.. New York 22. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postofflce under Act 3 March 1879. 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 2 Jiilv 1951 

HAL ROACH STUDIOS BLOSSOM WITH TV — Virtually idle during recent years, famous 
Hollywood Hal Roach lot is humming with TV film production, has long waiting list. 
Current productions include "Racket Squad" (Philip Morris), "Lone Ranger" and 
"Stuart Erwin Show" (General Mills), "Amos 'n* Andy" (Blatz), Bing Crosby Enter- 
prises' "Royal Playhouse," numerous commercials. But big deal cooked up by Pat 
Weaver, NBC television chief, may soon bump some of foregoing off Roach lot. 

WCCO CIRCULATION NEARLY TWICE AS BIC AS TWIN CITY NEWSPAPERS COMBINED— 

With summer business booming as result of aggressive sales drive and figures show- 
ing high summer listenership, WCCO, Minneapolis, unloaded more sales dynamite 
with its recent presentation. Station marshalled figures from extensive diary 
survey showing that it reached nearly twice as many homes in Minneapolis and St. 
Paul as all newspapers combined. 

MORE TROUBLE AHEAD FOR TV SET SALES? — Virtually overlooked in present diffi- 
culty retailers have in moving TV sets is effect development of Theatre TV may have. 
Groundswell of consumer irritation may be increasingly reflected at store counters. 
Printed media aren't helping any. LIFE was quick to flick salt in retailer wounds 
with coy editorial on free TV losing out to theatres after recent Louis-Savold 
bout. You can expect more columnists, editorialists to get in their licks. 

HOW RADIO STATIONS L ICK TV BUCABOO IN BIC CIT IES— Alert radio outlets in major 
TV markets are combating business declines with aggressive program ideas and mer- 
chandising tactics. WLS, Chicago; WNBC, New York; KYW, Philadelphia, have de- 
veloped strategies that are boosting billings over last year. WNBC's "Operation 
Chain Lightning" gives tieup with 6 food chains and amusement park. 

RADIO STATIONS LEAD IN BATTLE AGAINST NARCOTICS — Last week (29 June) WIP, 
Philadelphia, launched campaign against dope racketeers with documentary program 
recorded during Federal raids on Philadelphia narcotics dens. Veteran WIP pro- 
ducer, Varner Paulsen, and station's ace newscaster, John Facenda, used thousands 
of feet of tape to tell story complete with sound of doors crashing in on hideouts 
of peddlers. In Connecticut, meanwhile, Paul W. Morency, WTIC, Hartford, general 
manager leads battle against dope underworld. WTIC aroused public opinion, got 
stringent new narcotics law passed in state with cooperation of other stations. 
Now WTIC is offering aid to stations in other states who want to launch own crusades. 

WATCH FOR HARD-HITTINC CAMPAIGNS THR OUGHOUT RADIO/TV AGAINST NA RC OTICS — 

Following Wayne Coy's explanation to TV stations of what they can do to operate in 
public interest, civic improvement problems like narcotics will be uppermost in 
minds of TV broadcasters — as well as their AM confreres. Coy told 100 TV broad- 
casters at Washington, D. C, confab (22 June) that criteria of public-interest 
operation were: (1) Assistance in civic improvements; (2) Promotion of education- 
al and cultural opportunities; (3) News integrity; (4) Fairness of presentation of 
controversial issues; (5) Enterprise and zeal in promoting community labor rela- 
tions, inter-racial understanding; (7) Reliability, good taste, listenability of 
advertising on station. 



SPONSOR 



ft oaT Ji'pM fAmf 




Students at North Dakota Agricultural 
College recently conducted an independent 
survey among 3,969 farm families in a 
22-county area around Fargo. Each family 
was asked, "To what radio station does 
your family listen most?" 3,120 of the 
families named WD AY; only 174 named 
Station "B"! WDAY WAS A 17-TO-l 
CHOICE OVER THE NEXT STATION 
— A 3>y 2 -TO-l FAVORITE OVER ALL 



OTHER STATIONS COMBINED! 
Fargo-Moorhead Hoopers prove that 
WDAY consistently gets a 3-to-l greater 
Share of the "in-town" Audience than 
all other stations combined*! 
BMB figures and mail-pull stories also 
prove that WDAY "hogs the show", 
throughout the entire Red River Valley! 
Write for all the facts today, including 
availabilities. 



^■Despite the fact that tbe t other three major networks maintain local studios! 

WDAY • NR C • 970 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 

FREE & PETERS, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 





DIGEST FOR 2 JULY 1951 



VOLUME 5 NUMBER 14 



ARTICLES 



What you should knotv about morning men 

Those early-a.m. music-news-time-weather shows have long pulled top sales 

results for advertisers. SPONSOR study shows how they do it -I" 



Bell Telephone's party line: part Ml 

Why 18 Bell companies use spot radio/TV regionally to win local good 
will, aid in emergencies, and recruit labor 



24 



Is the sponsor really tloten on radio? 

Ed Kobak, consultant to top advertisers, says "no," citing flabbiness of 
broadcasters in selling man who foots the bill <— « 



Hon- Schwerin does it 

By eliminating guesswork about effectiveness of radio/TV commercials and 
programs, research techniques can save advertisers thousands of dollars »o 



TV Dictionary /Handbook for Sponsors 

Are you up on such TV lingo as "drooling," "fish bowl," "gobo," "flare"? 

This installment of Herb True's new lexicon gives valuable TV data S M. 



COMING 



FALL FACTS ISSUE 

Fifth annual briefing issue will boil down basic radio/TV trends and data 

sponsors need to make fall buying decisions 16 cftlfl/ 



I be sponsor looks at censorship 

The human and often whimsical history of a problem that sponsors must 

constantly face, current, future anxieties will be dealt with in this series 30 Jull} 



Sporting goods on the air 

How ond to what extent does the sporting goods industry use broadcast 
media to sell its wares? SPONSOR is now resarching this question 



Premiums on the air 

SPONSOR is currently surveying trends, techniques, do's and don'ts in 
use of premiums 



DEPARTMENTS 



MEN, MONEY & MOTiVES 


6 


510 MADISON 


10 


NEW AND RENEW 


13 


MR. SPONSOR: M. H. ROBINSON 


16 


P. S. 


17 


RADIO RESULTS 


36 


TV COMMERCIALS 


38 


MR. SPONSOR ASKS 


40 


ROUNDUP 


42 


SPONSOR SPEAKS 


64 




COVER: Whether dignified or zany, radio's 
"morning men" (6:00-9:00 a.m.) are among 
the most popular performers in America. In 
a special five-page article (see page 19) 
SPONSOR expjains their success, details re- 
sults they've pulled for every kind of adver- 
tiser. Two "morning men" shown on the 
cover are Joe Gentile and Ralph Binge, 
WJBK, Detroit wake-'em-up team. Their 
morning madness has earned them top rat- 
ing honors and a waiting list of sponsors. 

Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Erik H. Arctander, Frank 
Rasky, Len Finger 

Ass't Editors: Fred Birnbaum, Lila Lederman 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President - Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 
(Western Manager), George Weiss (Trav- 
eling Representative, Chicago Office), John 
A. Kovchok (Production Manager), Edna 
Yergin 

Vice-President - Business Mgr.: Bernard Piatt 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Joseph- 
ine Villanti 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.. 
combined with TV. executive, Editorial. Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 510 Madison Are., New York 22, 
N. Y. Telephone: Ml. nay Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
liil 10. Hi. mi Air . Suit. 205. Telephone: Superior 7-9863. 
West Coast Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Los Angeles. 

Telephone: Hillside B089. I' na Office: 5110 Elm 

Ave.. Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions: United States 
$8 a year. Canada and foreign $9. Single copies 50c 
I'rinted in I". S. A. Address all correspondence to 510 
Madisnn Avenue. New York 22. X. Y. Copyright 1951, 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



KWKH 
50.1 



IT'S EASY, 



WHEN YOU 
KNOWHOW! 



SHREVEPORT HOOPERS 

March, 1951 

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 

8:00 A.M. to 12:00 NOON 



riere's double-barreled proof that KWKH is the outstand- 
ng radio value in the rich tri-State market around Shreveport. 

Hoopers show that KWKH completely dominates the 
Shreveport audience. On Weekday Mornings, for example, 
KWKH gets a 146% greater Share of Audience than the 
next station . . . actually gets more listeners than all 
other stations combined! 

89.0% of KWKH's listeners, however, live outside of 
Shreveport. BMB Study No. 2 credits KWKH with a Day- 
time Audience of 303,230 families in 87 Louisiana, Arkansas 
and Texas counties. Proof that this is a loyal audience is 
the fact that 227, 701 of these families are "average 
daily listeners" to KWKH! 

Write direct or ask The Branham Company for the whole 
KWKH story. 




TkXAflk, 




'< J7TX7 



KWKH D 

BMB CO 

Study 

Spring 




<S 



KWKH 



50,000 Watts • CBS • 



Texas 



SHREVEPORT f LOUISIANA 



The Branham Company 
Representatives 

Henry Clay, General Manager 



Arkansas 



*fe# 






^ 



"buying 
power ";'i 




$192,555,000 

Effective Buying Income, 1950 




$134,098,000 

Retail Sales, 1950 

Copyright by Sales Mgt, 1951 



...that's what you like 
about the South 

Let WJBO connect 
Baton Rouge Buying- and 
Sales-Power for You! 

NBC's JV1 5,000 watt affiliate in Baton Rouge, La. 




AFFILIATED WITH THE STATE-TIMES AND MORNING ADVOCATD 
FURTHER DATA FROM OUR NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



Philosophy is the art of realizing things could be worse. It may 
cheer cost-groggy TV sponsors, who see production as slow as a 
stagehand on double time, to hear about an even more erratic, un- 
predictable and budget-bursting kind of "show business." We refer 
to the making of "prestige" phonograph records by great vocal and 
instrumental virtuosi. Here "the sponsor" deals with aristocrats who 
work under the conditions, in the places, and at the times they dic- 
tate, who have, by contract, the sole right of veto on musical quality. 
Perfectionism, temperament and over-budget operations are not only 
inevitable but invariable. So, gentlemen, it could be worse. 

* * * 

Just about 20 years ago, radio program control was passing, 
gradually at first, then in a rush, from the networks to the advertis- 
ing agencies. The trend was in full tide by 1933 when two-way 
circuits to Hollywood were fully available. Today, in a reversal 
of history, it is the agencies, not the networks, which more or less 
willingly abdicate program-building responsibility. Will the agen- 
cies, like the networks, come in due course to rue their easy way out 
in letting George do it? 

* * * 

To ask this question, is to open a can of worms. 

* * * 

But the question is being asked, will be asked more and more as 
time goes on. The advertiser, as such, has a natural and irrepressible 
interest in the matter of who gets what, and why. Can advertising 
agencies, relying altogether on outside free-lance talent, indefinitely 
justify to their clients a system of talent-buying which adds a 15% 
charge to a package when everybody is on the package payroll, 
including the very agency supervisors? It's an easy prediction, from 
what we already hear around, that this issue will raise, and rage, 
during 1951-52. 

* * * 

Meanwhile, we feel an impressionistic word-picture coming on. 

This is Television, New York, July, 1951. 

There is a dancing spotlight on $-signs marching like Luckies. 

We fade in on a plunging neckline, hold, correction, don't hold. 

Pick up stagehand, nephew of another stagehand. 

Stagehand slowly crosses set, grasps flower vase, slowly removes 
same. 

Charge for stagehand, $3, plus 25% for network overhead. 

Stagehand drops flower vase, it shatters. 

"Gees, I need a beer," says the stagehand, taking five. 

Cost of broken flower vase, $42, add 25% for network overhead. 

What you say to the stagehands union: nothing. 

Janitor sweeps up floor, add overhead to floor. Add floor to 
overhead, add beer to stagehand's waist. The men's room is free, 
included in the overhead. 

{Please turn to page 49) 



SPONSOR 




WKAP— Allentown, Pa. 



WNAR— Norrisrown, Pa. • WWNR— Beckley, W. Va. 

JOE RAHALL — President 



2 JULY 1951 



Shall this be written on the tombstone— 

RADIO 
1920-1951 

THE OPERATION WAS A SUCCESS 
BUT THE PATIENT DIED 

Perhaps. Yet the curious fact apparent at this 
writing is that the patient is not dead at all. 
Virile in its youth, grown wiser in its maturity, 
the 31-year-old giant is being buried alive! 

Those of us who have watched the industry 
through the years have seen the infant mature, 
until today, radio is herculean in its power alike 
to serve the public interest and to move moun- 
tains of American-built products. 

How odd, then, that there are those today 
who are frenzied as flies in a mirrored box in 
their zeal to bury radio while it yet lives. How 
odd that a mass hysteria reminiscent of bank 
runs of the thirties should grip advertising peo- 
ple, a caste which has, until now, believed itself 
insulated against such emotional contagion. 

The trade press headlines "Radio's Fight for 
Survival." Great networks slice radio rates. 
Rumor flics that radio is doomed. The infection, 
until these last months shielded from the public 
by the skin and flesh of sober judgment, has 
broken through, a blood red rash across the face 
<>l the industry in New York and other major 
advertising centers. 

Witch-hunt Atmosphere 

And we who must view from afar arc startled 
by the witch-hunt atmosphere of those who 
would track down a great industry and cast it in 



PLEASE... 



the grave that its last breath might be smothered 
by the very ones who fathered it. Little wonder 
that the competition stands by, slyly smiling, 
and now and then kicking a shoeful of dirt 
graveward. 

Perhaps one quiet voice can do little to halt 
the surge of emotional thoughtlessness. Even so 
we would speak out. Even so we would call 
attention to the facts. 

At WSM— and we venture to say at other large 
stations throughout America— there is no wild 
retreat. There is no slashing of rates unaffected 
by network operations. There are no convulsive 
midnight conferences. 

At WSM there is business as usual. And as 
usual, business is good. Business, in fact, has 
never been so good as it is right now in 1951. 
Station income is up. We have more people on 
our payroll than ever before. Advertisers on 
WSM still clamor for certain programs . . . and 
one show has a waiting list of four sponsors 
standing in line to take the program in case it 
should become available. 

Each week we originate 17 network shows 
from our Nashville studios. Each week people 
come from all over America to see our shows 
produced — in fact, more than 300,000 people 
will see WSM live originations as they go on 
the air this year. 

Talent cutback? Not at WSM where we have 
more than 200 big name entertainers on our 
payroll. Radio dying? Not at this station where 
national magazines send writers down year after 
year to do the WSM story. The latest such story, 
by the way, appears in Collier's this summer. 



NOT BURIED ALIVE! 



WSM type radio with emphasis on live pro- 
ductions to satisfy the tastes of a regional audi- 
ence continues to pay off just as it has for 25 
vears. For instance, take the case of a work- 
clothes manufacturer who, two years ago, made 
WSM his only advertising medium for reaching 
the Central South. During the past 12 months, 
with a single half-hour show per week, sales 
have increased 21 per cent— this, mind you, for a 
company which had been selling hard in this 
same market for the past 85 years! 

Big Bad Bug-a-boo 

Here's an excerpt from a report from a large 
food manufacturer: "With one WSM program 
per week, the area covered by this advertising 
has shown the greatest sales increase in our his- 
tory." This, from a company which, in other 
markets, is using newspaper, outdoor and the 
Big Bad Bug-a-boo, television.* 

Over the last three years, a paint manufac- 
turer with just one WSM program per week has 
concentrated on expanding his distribution. 
The result— he has increased his dealership in 
the Central South by 82 per cent! 

A Southern flour miller has such firm faith in 
WSM advertising that he has concentrated more 
than half his total advertising budget on this 
one station during the last six years. The formula 
has paid off with ( 1 ) a sales area expanded to 
18 states (2) production increased from 160,000 
units in 1945 to 410,000 units in 1950. 

The advertising manager of one of the coun- 
try's largest shoe manufacturers — a company 
using television, national magazines and news- 
papers—reported to his own board of directors 
recently that his WSM advertising of the past 



two years has been the "most satisfying adver- 
tising experience of my career." Little wonder 
—actual statistics show that the area covered by 
his WSM program has shown a 96 per cent in- 
crease saleswise this past year. 

If you like, we'll furnish names of these com- 
panies and more details. More success stories, 
too. 

But the point we would like to make is that 
the WSM kind of radio is alive, and growing as 
never before in our 25 years. 

It is true that WSM is one of America's big 
stations, operating with the power of a 50,000 
watt Clear Channel voice to reach a vast area. 
Still we are but a part of a great industry. We 
would not speak for other broadcasters. 

If there are those who say their network or 
their radio station is sick and must be given the 
emergency stimulant found in rate cuts we may 
disagree. We may feel that they are victims of 
the contagion of defeatism. But in the final 
analysis, it is for these broadcasters to make their 
own decision about their own future. 

We speak only for WSM. We say only this — 
Radio at WSM is here to stay because of the 
simple and obvious fact that never before has it 
sold so much merchandise or served so many 
people. Radio Station WSM with its operation 
geared to the needs of a region continues to be 
the only single medium which takes an adver- 
tiser's message to 7/2 million people in the Cen- 
tral South.— WSM, Inc., Broadcasting Service of 
the National Life & Accident Insurance Co., 
Nashville. 



* Incidentally, we don't sell television short, either. We think enough 
of this new medium to invest WSM-TV money in a 200-mile micro- 
wave relay system to bring network shows from the nearest cable- 
connection point in Louisville, Kentucky. 



mkcimt 




Potential lis- 
teners — day 
and night-time 
average 



1945 



I 



24685/ 



I hour rate — 
day and night- 
time average 



%0 



00 



1950 



522,835 




CKAC costs 47% less 

per listener NOW than 

in 1945! 

Even though increasing opera- 
ting costs force us to adjust our 
rates, CKAC remains your best 
advertising buy in French Can- 
ada. Latest B.B.M. figures prove 
our point — CKAC covers 
Quebec at lowest cost per lis- 
tener, now as ever. 

CBS Outlet in Montreal 

Key Station of the 

A TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CKAC 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives : 

Adam J. Young Jr. • New York, Chicago 

William Wright • Toronto 




Madison 



COMMERCIAL LONGEVITY 

Some while ago I read an article, I 
believe it was in sponsor, regarding 
the length of time radio and television 
announcements are on the air before 
losing their effectiveness. If it was in 
SPONSOR, will you kindly refer me to 
the issue in which the article appeared. 
If my recollection is correct, it was late 
last fall. 

Ralph Foote 
Advertising Manager 
Beech-Nut Packing Co. 
New York 

• Reader Foote will fine] Boh Foreman's discus* 
sion of the life of radio announcements in SPON- 
SORS 21 May issue. The 7 May SPONSOR car- 
ried an artiele titled : "How long does a TV com- 
mereial live?" 



RADIO'S PIED PIPER 

Some months ago sponsor carried a 
very excellent story on new Warfarin 
and D-Con. Somebody walked off with 
that particular issue of SPONSOR and I 
would appreciate it if you could send 
me another one. Losing sponsor is 
like losing the Standard Rate and Data 
on the way to a pitch! 

Gardner Reames 
Account Executive 
Russell C. Comer Co. 
Kansas City, Mo. 



RESEARCH MUMBO-JUMBO 

Congratulations on your persistent 
effort to clear the fog that surrounds 
so much of media research. The arti- 
cle in the 7 May issue, "Are you 
floored by research mumbo-jumbo?" 
is the clearest statement on advertising 
research that I have seen. 

Because it is our aim to achieve clar- 
ity of purpose, and clarity of expres- 
sion in all research reports produced 
by CORE, we would like permission to 
reproduce this article — with proper 
credit to sponsor, of course. 

Too much talk and writing about 
research neglects the purpose of re- 
search. Research must serve as a guide 
to action. It is useless for this purpose 
unless the results are both understand- 
able and interesting to the man who 
has to make the decisions. I sualh this 
man is no social scientist. Instead of 
trying to bring the mountain to Mo- 



hammed, we believe that the social sci- 
entist must present his findings in a 
form that can be readily digested by 
busy "top brass." 

Albert A. Shea 
Communications Research 
Toronto 



SPANISH PROGRAMING SELLS 

Congratulations on the excellence 
and thoroughness of your article on 
Spanish-language radio. It is welcome 
support for the story we have been 
selling for many years. 

The only adverse criticism I have to 
offer is that the article failed to achieve 
a proper balance between the Spanish- 
language markets in Texas and Cali- 
fornia. I refer specifically to the omis- 
sion of any mention of the 300,000 
Spanish-speaking people in the San 
Francisco-Oakland area. KWBR has 
programmed successfully for this mar- 
ket for more than 11 years, and other 
stations in the area also devote con- 
siderable program time to the Mexi- 
can-American population. 

Larry Krasner 
Vice President 
Forjoe & Company 
Los Angeles 



\our article on "How to win with 
Juan ' was thought-provoking and in- 
teresting. 

Our experience with Spanish-lan- 
guage broadcasting, largely in San 
Antonio and the lower Rio Grande val- 
ley and El Paso, on Cloverbloom "99," 
certainly proved its power beyond a 
doubt. 

We have been working for some 
time, trying to prepare a list of Span- 
ish stations. If you are preparing such 
a list, we would like to have several 
copies for our research files. 

Gene M. Lightfoot 
Radio-TV Director 
Evans & Associates 
Fort Worth 

• SPONSOR has compiled ;i li-i of Southwest 
Spanish language stations which is available on 
request. 



BRAVO! Although it was no sur- 
prise to us that your article on the 
Spanish-language market ("How to 
win with Juan") was a thorough and 
accurate analysis of this huge "mar- 
ket within a market," we nevertheless 
feel impelled to salute SPONSOR for an 
outstanding presentation. 

It is almost axiomatic now that the 



10 



SPONSOR 



more difficult the subject, the better the 
job that sponsor does. In our estima- 
tion, an accurate picture on the Span- 
ish-language market in the United 
States, when it has to be compressed 
into one article, poses many difficul- 
ties, sponsor met and mastered them 
all. 

As it has been often in the past, our 
hat is off to sponsor! 

Arthur Gordon 
Sales Manager 
National Time Sales 
New York 



Kudos to you and your good maga- 
zine, sponsor. We, who are trying to 
promote the Mexican-American, are 
muchly appreciative of your article in 
the 4 June issue: "How to win with 
Juan." 

Our organization. Harlan G. Oakes 
and Associates, in conjunction with 
National Time Sales, is a radio repre- 
sentative firm, not an advertising firm 
as stated in the article. 

sponsor might, at a later date also 
correct an erroneous impression that 
only U. S. stations do a job with the 
Mexican-American. I think it is safe 
to say that the full-time border stations 
who broadcast in Spanish are equally 
well received by the U. S. citizen of 
Mexican extraction. Their coverage is 
generally limited to a radius of 100 
miles north of the border, so the U. S. 
stations must of necessity complement 
their coverage in the interior. Lan- 
guage, loyalty to traditions, habits, and 
social discrimination make the Mexi- 
can-American extremely receptive to 
advertising in his mother tongue. 

Harlan G. Oakes 

President 

Harlan G. Oakes & Associates 

Los Angeles 



Along the lines of the Spanish pro- 
graming article that you ran in SPON- 
SOR, I thought you would be interested 
in the following information concern- 
ing the station I represent in Denver. 

KTLN carries Spanish programing 
from 5:00 to 6:30 a.m. and from 8:30 
to 9:30 a.m. They feel they are reach- 
ing 24,000 Spanish families. The pro- 
gram features Paco Sanchez and his 
wife. The format is built around Latin 
American, Spanish and Italian music. 
Paco Sanchez is the "leader and 
spokesman" for the Spanish group on 
the Denver mayor's board of directors 
and Colorado's governor's council. 



KTLN has, in addition, Spanish- 
speaking announcers and will trans- 
late English copy into Spanish with- 
out cost. 

Peggy Stone 

Vice President 

Radio Representatives, Inc. 

New York 



Congratulations on printing one of 
the finest articles ever conceived for 
Southwest stations that program to the 
Mexican audience. The facts outlined 
in "How to win with Juan" only help 
to further indicate the impact of Span- 
ish radio in Texas. We program two 
hours daily at KFRD, and over half 
of a long list of satisfied advertisers 
come from nearby Houston. Unsolic- 
ited! 

Jim Hairgrove 

General Manager 

KFRD 

Rosenberg, Tex. 

I want to congratulate you on your 
article "How to win with Juan" which 
appeared in the 4 June SPONSOR. 

I have been a radio announcer, 
Spanish program director-producer for 
the past 10 years, having been con- 
nected with such radio stations as 
KIBL, Beeville; KRIO, McAllen: 
KGBS, Harlingen: KBKI, Alice, Texas. 
During my years of experience I have 
made a survey of the likes and dislikes 
of the Latin American audience, espe- 
cially in Southwest Texas, and have 
discovered the type of music each 
group likes or dislikes. This has helped 
me to win the title of "Dean of Latin 
American Announcers" through a sur- 
vey made some four years ago in the 
Valley of the Rio Grande. 

I wish we had a network in Spanish 
like CBS or ABC; then we could real- 
ly give our sponsors better results. 
However, they get better results by us- 
ing radio than any newspapers. ... I, 
for one, read the headlines, the sports 
section and the funnies, and that's all; 
I pay very little attention to the ads 
and most of the Latin Americans do 
the same. 

I have a program here from 1 :00 to 
4:00 p.m. week days and from 1:00 to 
5:00 p.m. Sundays and our station has 
become to be known as "The Listen- 
ing Habit of Latin America Where 
Thousands of Good Amigos Tune in 
Every Afternoon . . . The Listening 
Post of South Texas . . . Beeville's 
{Please turn to page 58) 



WML 

wmm 




This cutie's a smarty — she 
trusts in her ears, 

And buys only products about 
which she hears. 

The place that she turns to for 
this advice on Cood buys 

is "The Voice of Toledo" and 
here are the "why's?" 

For Thirty Years WSPD has 
served her both daytime and 
night 

With Cood Programs, Cood 
sponsors — we've done the 
job right. 

Buy Toledo's WSPD where a 
majority audience is always 
assured. 

So, if it's sales you are seeking, 
want your spots to be heard 



111889 




2 JULY 1951 



11 




KGW THE ONLY STATION 
WHICH GIVES THE ADVERTISER 
COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE 



the ORBGO 




GXfflffi 




BROADCAST MEASUREMENT 
BUREAU SURVEYS PROVE 

KGW's LEADERSHIP 

Actual engineering tests have proved that KGW's efficient 
620 frequency provides a greater coverage area and 
reaches more radio families than any other Portland 
radio station regardless of power. BMB surveys beat 
out this fact. KGW is beamed to cover the population 
concentration of Oregon's Willamette Valley and South 
western Washington. 

TOTAL BMB FAMILIES 
(From 1949 BMB Survey) 




DAYTIME 

KGW 
Station B 
Station C 
Station D 

NIGHTTIME 

KGW 
Station B 
Station C 
Station D 



350 
337 
295 
192 



367, 
350 
307, 
205, 



This chart, compiled from offi- 
cial, half-milivolt contour maps 
filed with the FCC in Washing, 
ton, DC, or from field intensity 
surveys, tells the story of KGW's 
COMPREHENSIVE COVER- 
AGE of the fastest-growing mar- 
ket in the nation. 



PORTLAND, OREGO 

ON THE EFFICIENT 620 FREQUENCY 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY & CO 



New and renew 




JULY 



19 5 1 



I. New on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Block Drug Inc 

General Foods Corp 

H. J. Heinz Co 

Kellogg Co 

Kellogg Co 

Miles Laboratories Inc 

Rexall Drug Co 

tt ,1.1, ..... Co 

William Wrigley Jr Co 

William Wrigley Jr Co 
William Wrigley Jr Co 
William Wrigley Jr Co 



Cecil & Presbrey 

Young & Rubicam 

Maxon 

Kenyon el Eckhar.lt 

Kenyon & Eckhardt 

Geoffrey Wade 

BBDO 

BBDO 

Arthur Meyerhoff 

Arthur Meyerhoff 
Arthur Meyerhoff 
Arthur Meyerhoff 



ABC 164 

ABC 182 

ABC 290 

ABC 230 

ABC 230 

MBS 482 

CBS 183 

CBS 149 

CBS 175 

CBS 175 

CBS 175 

CBS 175 



No School Today; Sat 10-10:15 am; 23 Jun ; 

52 wks 
Breakfast Club; M-F 9-9:15 am; 2 Jul; 52 

wks 
A Life in Your Hands; F 9-9:30 pm; 29 Jun; 

13 wks 
Mark Trail; M, W, F 5:30-55 pm ; 1 Oct; 52 

wks 
Victor Borge; M, W, F 5:55-6 pm ; 1 Oct; 52 

wks 
Alka Seltzer Time; M-F 12-12:15 pm ; 18 Jun; 

52 wks 
Peggy Lee Show; Sun 7:30-8 pm; 17 Jun; 7 

wks 
FBI in Peace and War; Th 8-8:30 pm ; 5 Jul; 

52 wks (co-sponsored with General Mills Inc) 
Broadway Is My Beat; Sun 9-9:30 pm ; 8 Jul; 

6 wks 
Romance; M 9-9:30 pm; 16 Jul; 6 wks 
Johnny Dollar; W 9-9:30 pm; 18 July; 5 wks 
Lineup; Th 9-9:30 pm; 5 Jul; 7 wks 



2. Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Oil Co 

Campbell Soup Co 
Campbell Soup Co 



Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 

General Mills Inc 

Theodore Hamm Brewing 

Co 
Kraft Foods Co 

Kraft Foods Co 

ft-ongines-Wittnauer Watch 

Co 
Noxzema Chemical Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 

Procter & Gamble Co 

Procter & Gamble Co 

Procter & Gamble Co 

Procter & Gamble Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 

Procter & Gamble Co 

Procter & Gamble Co 

TJ. S. Army and U. S. Air 

Force 
Seeman Brothers Inc 

Voice of Prophecy Inc 

Williamson Candy Co 



Joseph Katz CBS 78 

Ward Wheelock CBS 153 

Ward Wheelock NBC 34 

NBC 32 

Sherman & Marquette CBS 152 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- ABC 207 

Sample 

Campbell-Mithun CBS 27 

J. Walter Thompson MBS 524 

Needham, Louis and NBC 154 

Brorbv 

Victor Bennett CBS 149 

SSCB MBS 98 

Compton CBS 127 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- CBS 131 

Sample 

Benton & Bowles CBS 156 

Biow NBC 143 

Benton & Bowles NBC 15 1 

Compton NBC 153 

Pedlar & Ryan NBC 158 

Compton NBC 155 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- NBC 143 

Sample 

Grant ABC 290 

William H. Weintraub ABC 272 

Western ABC 145 

Aubrey, Moore & MBS 526 
Wallace 



Edward R. Murrow ; M-F 7:45-8 pm; 2 Jul; 52 

Club 15; M-F 7:30-45 pm; 25 Jun; 52 wks 
Double or Nothing; M-F 10:30-11 am; 25 Jul; 

52 wks 
Double or Nothing; M-F 2-2:30 pm; 2S Jul; 

52 wks 
Mr. and Mrs. North; T 8:30-9 pm; 3 Jul; 52 

wks 
Betty Crocker Magazine of the Air; M-F 10:30- 

45 am; 4 Jun; 52 wks 
Edward R. Murrow; M-F 7:45-8 pm; 2 Jul; 52 

wks 
Queen for a Day; T, Th ill.-,.....,. 3 Jul; 

52 wks 
The Falcon; W 8:30-9 pm; 25 Jul; 52 wks 

Symphonettes; Sun 10:30-11 pm ; 17 Jun; 28 

wks 
Gabriel Heatter; M 7:30-45 pm ; 3 Sep; 52 wks 
Lowell Thomas; M-F 6:45-7 pm; 2 Jul; 52 wks 
Bculah; M-F 7-7:15 pm; 2 Jul; 52 wks 

Jack Smith Show; M-F 7:15-30 pm; 2 Jul; 52 

wks 
Welcome Travelers; M-F 10-10:30 am; 2 Jul; 

52 wks 
Life Can Be Beautiful; M-F 3-3:15 pm; 2 Jul; 

52 wks 
Road of Life; M-F 3:15-30 pm; 2 Jul; 52 wks 
Pepper Young's Family; M-F 3:30-45 pm; 2 

Jul; 52 wks 
A Right to Happiness; M-F 3:45-4 pm ; 2 Jul; 

52 wks 
Backstage Wife; M-F 4-4:15 pm; 2 Jul; 52 

wks 
The Game of the Week; Sat aft; 13 Oct; 7 wks 

Monday Morning Headlines; Sun 6:15-30 pm ; 

27 May; 52 wks 
Voice of Prophecy; Sun 9:30-10 am; 17 Jun; 

52 wks 
True Detective Mysteries; Sun 5:30-6 pm; 2 

Sep; 52 wks 



3. New National Spot Radio Rusiness 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Borden Co 

Chrysler Corp 



Sanowhite cleaning 

compound 
Dodge div 



Picard (N.Y.) 

Ruthrauff & Rvan 
(N.Y.) 



20 stns; Wis.. Minn.. la 

N.Y., Mich. 
National 



1-min anncmts; spring-sum- 
mer 
1-tuiii anncmtaj 9 Jul: 3 wks 



• In next issue: New and Renewed on Television (Network and Spot) ; 
Station Representation Changes; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 






Numbers after names 
refer to category in 
New and Renew: 

J. E. Baudino (4) 
Murray Grabhorn(4) 
Murry Harris (4) 
Adna H. Karns (4) 
Emmett Heerdt (4) 



4. National Broadcast Sales Executives 



\ru- and Renew 2 July 1951 




NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 




Joseph E. Baud i no 
Leon Benson 

Gilbert I. Berry 
Chester E. Daly 
Cordon W. Davis 
Srott Donahue Jr 
Dick Dorrance 

Jacob A. Evans 

Ernest Felix 
Chuck Gay 

Arthur Gerbel Jr 
Murray B. Grabhorn 
Gordon Grannis 
Miirry Harris 
John S. Hayes 
Emmet t Heerdt 
Adna H. Karns 

Wayne Kearl 
Don L. Kearney 
Alex Kecse 

James M. Kennedy 
Paul E. Moore 
Richard A. Moore 
Hugh Murphy 

Robert W. Sarnoff 

Arnold Snyder 

Clarke A. (Fritz) Snyder 

Donn B. Tatum 
Franklin A. Tooke 
Chris J. Whitting 



KDKA, Pittsb., mgr 

J. Walter Thompson. Hlywd., radio -tv 

dept head 
DiiMont, Chi., central div sis mgr 
WBEN, Buffalo, local sis mgr 
KYW, Phlla., staff announcer 
WPIX, N.Y., sis mgr 
O'Brien & Dorrance, N.Y., prom 

consultant 
NBC, N.Y., mgr sis development, adv, 

prom 
ABC, Hlywd., asst treas 
Kircher, Helton and Collett, Dayton, 

radio-tv dir 
KJR, Seattle, sis mgr 
ABC, N.Y., spot sis superv 
KGO, S. F., asst adv prom mgr 
TV Guide, N.Y., prom dir 
WTOP Inc, Wash., vp 
CBS Radio Sales, N.Y., acct exec 
WING, Dayton; WIZE. Springfield, gen 

mgr 
KSL, Salt Lake, pub sve editor 
Katz Agency, N.Y., asst tv sis mgr 
Dallas News, Dallas, air sve mgr in 

charge regional sis 
WBAL, it. ill. i . acct exec 
KJR, Seattle, acct exec 
KECA-TV, L.A., gen mgr 
KWEM, West Memphis, Ark., mgr 

NBC, N.Y., dir unit prod 
WTTM, Trenton, news dir 
Biow Co, N.Y., acct exec on spec 

assgnmts 
Don Lee. Hlywd.. vp 
KYW, I'l.it i . prog mgr 
DuMont, N.Y., gen mgr 



Westinghouse Radio Stations, Wash., gen mgr 
Ziv Television Programs Inc, Hlywd., exec 

WIBC, Indianapolis, sen sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

Same, prog mgr 

Katz Agency, N.Y., asst tv sis mgr 

MBS, N.Y., dir pub rel 

Same, mgr net radio adv, prom 

Same, act gen mgr western div 
WHIO, Dayton, sis prom mgr 

Same, asst gen mgr 
NARTSR, N.Y., managing dir 
Same, adv, prom mgr 

A. C. Nielsen Co, N.Y., dir pub rel, radio-tv div 
Same, pres 

WEEI. Boston, sis mgr 
Great Trails Broadcasting Corp, Dayton, vp 

Same, prom mgr 
Same, tv prog mgr 
WFAA, Dallas, asst mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

KTTV, L. A., gen mgr 

Paul H. Raymer, Memphis, mgr of new Memphis 

office 
Same, vp 

WNJR, Newark, prom, pub dir 
CBS, N.Y., field rep for CBS-TV sis sve dept 

ABC, Hlywd., dir tv western div 
WOWO, Ft. Wayne, stn mgr 
Same, dir DuMont net 



5. Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Walter E. Benoit 

Anton W. Bondy 
G. S. Brady 

William K. Easthan 

Mortimer W. Loew 

H. A. I.udlam 
Richard O. Pallin 

T. W. Pierre 
Ralph M. Watts 



Westinghouse Radio Stations, Wash., vp, gen Westinghouse Air-Arm div, Balto.. mgr 

mgr 
Kenyon & Erkhardt. N.Y., media buyer 
General Eoods Corp, N.Y., asst dir market 

researeh 
Whitehall Pharmacal Co, N.Y., asst adv mgr 



Lever Brothers Co, N.Y., asst media dir. adv 
Same, dir market research 



dept 



DuMont, N.Y., dir tv net 

Lever Brothers Co. N.Y., sis mgr (N.Y. div) 
Gray Mfg Co, Hartford, adv, sis prom dir 
Lever Brothers Co, N.Y., Atlanta div sis mgr 
General Foods, Evansville (Igleheart Brothers 
div), sis, adv mgr grocery specialties 



Lever Brothers Co, N.Y., brand adv mgr (Lux Toi- 
let Soap, Lux Flakes, Silver Dust brands) 

Allen B. DuMont Laboratories, Clifton, N. J., exec 
asst to pres 

Same, asst field sis mgr 

Rheem Mfg Co, N.Y'., adv, sis prom mgr 

Same, sis mgr (N.Y". div) 

Same, N.Y'., prod mgr Post Cereals div 



6. New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 




Numbers after names 
refer to category in 
New and Renew: 

Don L. Kearney (4) 
Friti Snyder (4) 

Chris Whitting (4) 
Walter E. Benoit (5) 
W. K. Eastham (5) 



B. C. Telephone Co. Vancouver, B. C. 

Bcrkline Corp, Morrlstown, Tenn, 

Burke Motors, < hi. 

Craft shire Sports N.Y. 

Dolci Ltd. Toronto 

Albert Fillers Inc, N.Y. 

Green Spot Inc. I.. A. 

Joel Brother-, Corp, N.Y. 

Lever Brothers Co, N.Y. 
Lusk Candy Co, Davenport, la. 
Page-Barker Distributors of America, Seattl 
Salad Master of California, Oakland 
William S. Scull Co, Camden. N. J. 
Security Finance, San Jose 

^peeial Foods Co, Chi. 

Trade- It iic Co, Cincinnati 

\\ hole-Sum Products Co, Phlla. 



'I elephone company 
Berk-Lock chairs 
Automobile dealer 
Women's suit manufacturer 
Shoe manufacturer 
Coffee, tea, spices 
Non-carbonated orange beverage 
Jewelry manufacturer 

Lifebuoy shaving ere am 

Candy manufacturer 
Page-Barker British hair lotion 

K ttchen utensils 

Boseul coffee processor 

Finance company 

Jay*s potato chips 

Home merchandise distributor 

Candy manufacturer 



James Lo\ ick & Co, Vancouver, B.C. 
Hammer Co, Hartford, Conn. 

Olian, Chi. 

William Wilbur, N.Y. 

inderson, .Smith & Cairns. Toronto 

Frwin. Wasey, N.Y. 

Beaumont & Ilohman, L. A. 

William Warren, Jackson & Dclaney, 

N.Y. 
Kenyon & Eckbardt, N.Y. 
Alter, Rock Island, 111. 
Howard J. Ryan & Son, Seattle 
Richard N. Meltzer, S. F. 
Lamb & Keen, Phila. (eff 1 Sep) 
Richard N. Mcltzer, S. F. 
OUaii. Chi. 

Guenther, Brown & Berne, Cinn. 
Herbert B. Sbor, Phil a. 




SECEDE? 




767,365 ,A " ,L . 
145,715 



"621,650 



FAMILIES NOT 
IN TV AREA 



Figures BMB + 3.6% to 1951 
based on ANA Report. 



We don't hold with those who — as ANA — suggest 

that a TV home is completely and forever lost to 

radio, but suppose every radio family in WOAI's area 

which could conceivably become a TV home (only a 

little more than one-fourth are TV homes now) did 

secede from WOAI's 28-year history of dominant coverage. 621,650 

homes outside the TV area still would be served by WOAI. That's 

77% more homes than WOAI served in 1942. WOAI's rate has 

increased only 13% since 1942. Hooper shows WOAI leads in 

audience morning, afternoon and night. WOAI is a better than 

ever buy! 



Even if every radio family in WOAI'S TV area should secede, WOAI, 
instead of cutting rate, still might logically increase its rate by a 
very substantial amount. 



San Antonio 

(j$tW| A AM [RICA'S FASTCST 
*\-T- GROWING 

MAJOR CITY 



2 JULY 1951 




Represented Nationally by 
EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY, INC. 
New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, St. Louis 
Dallas, San Francisco, Detroit 




BUiUiUijjm 



15 




($$EIfWIi^ 



—AND WE LOVE IT! 




In Richmond, Va., it's WRNL for 
SALES RESULTS! When you buy 

WRNL, you get a Ready-To-Buy 
audience that has the WRNL 

listening habit. To get your 
share of this rich Richmond 
market remember . . . 



THERE'S MORE 
SELL ... ON 




For over 10 years . . . 
910 KC 5000 WATTS 

ABC AFFILIATE 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



EDWARD PETRY & CO.. INC.. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 





Meyer H. Robinson 

Advertising Director-Sales Manager 
Monarch Wine Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



You needn't take a course at the Berlitz School of Languages to 
pronounce Manischewitz. For radio, repeating the Monarch brand 
name daily, has familiarized listeners with this sweet kosher-type 
wine; made it a leading seller. (Incidentally, the firm has an asso- 
ciation with The B. Manischewitz Company, food manufacturer, but 
is a separate corporate entity.) 

For Monarch's 45-year-old Meyer Robinson it's an advertising 
idea come true; a gamble that paid off. Up until recent years printed 
media alone carried the Monarch story to consumers. But when 
Robinson joined Monarch in 1935. after putting aside a lucrative 
legal practice, he staunchly advocated a radio campaign. He ex- 
plains: "I felt that Manischewitz had a wider market than its old- 
time limits as a sacramental wine. And that radio airing our phrase, 
'captures the true taste of the grape,' would get a word picture across 
better than any other medium." 

The Robinson all-out approach : he dropped printed media with 
the exception of foreign language newspapers and point-of-sale ma- 
terial ; radio was to carry the sales burden. 

Starting in 1949, Monarch tested radio in New York and Pennsyl- 
vania but expansion was rapid. Today some 55 radio stations (80 to 
90 in the fall) and 15 TV outlets plug Manischewitz. Campaign aims 
at personal endorsement by talent, stresses live participations. 

"'The budget," says genial New York-born Robinson, "is over 
$250,000." He explains Monarch-Manischewitz strategy: "In the 
U. S., 30% of the people consume 90 r < of the domestic wine pro- 
duction. Manischewitz air promotion is aimed at the 70' < who 
don't drink any type wine. We, and our agency, Donahue & Coe, 
sell Manischewitz appetite-appeal for America's sweet tooth." 

A recent survey by the Los Angeles Times shows the Manischewitz 
brand to be second in L. A. among domestic wines. Among kosher- 
type wines, Manischewitz is the country's leader. Robinson is presi- 
dent of the American Wine Association (N. Y. State) and the Nation- 
al Wine Association. 

Leisure-time activities for gregarious Robinson include golf, char- 
ity organization work, and a favorite annual "Off the Record" dinner 
for the Brooklyn Dodgers at the Monarch wine plant. 



16 



SPONSOR 



iVew? developments on SPONSOR stories 




See: 

Issue: 
Subject: 



"What net rate cut means to 
sponsors" 

7 May 1951, p. 21 

Rise in station rates and change in 
network structure loom in period 
ahead 



Ads are busting out all over, telling radio's story to advertisers 
in the wake of the now complete round of network rate decreases. 
The ads, most of them dynamic in tone, signify that networks and 
stations like WOAI, WNOX, KVOO, WFAA and KFYR are deter- 
mined to prove their current value to sponsors. 

A current CBS Radio Network ad entitled "Television's Big Broth- 
er . . ." calls TV a wonder child. But, CBS points out that TV's "big 
brother," network radio, is still the only medium that combines all 
advertising essentials; nation-wide coverage, thumping impact . . . 
and minimum cost. Cost-per-thousand on CBS net is $1.18; leading 
magazines, $2.72; newspapers, $4.03. 

An NBC Pacific Coast Network ad reports 14,000,000 new radio 
sets sold last year. The illustration depicts out-of-home and multiple 
set listenership and adds: "Wherever You Go . . . You Find Radio." 

WSM, Nashville, protests gloom about radio with "Please . . . Not 
Buried Alive!" WSM points out that it originates 17 network shows 
(one show has four sponsors waiting for availabilities), emphasizes 
that radio is ". . . only single medium which takes an adyertiser's 
message to 7,500,000 people in the central South." 

Edward Petry & Company, station representatives, voice their pro- 
tests against slashing of rates in a two-page ad story. A reappraisal 
of radio rates, says the Petry firm, must be done on a market-by-mar- 
ket basis. The company points out that markets like Portland and 
Wichita have increased in radio families, making a uniform rate re- 
duction decidedly unfair. It asks each advertiser and agency to 
"measure radio as you would measure any advertising medium — in 
each market — by what it delivers for the dollar put into it." 

In Moline, 111.. WQUA ran a full page ad headed "Don't Be TV 
Slaphappy" and requested listeners to take advantage of summer- 
time listening outdoors. John Grandy, WQUA's commercial man- 
ager, reports that in Moline, "a television market . . . WQUA has 
just completed the biggest month in its history." 

See: "Seward's folly: 1950" 

Issue: 5 June 1950, p. 28 

SUHJCCtS National advertisers flock to Alaskan 
radio 

Broadcast advertisers in Alaska continue to hit pay dirt. 

Programing now includes live major league games and a soap 
opera. Listeners, for the first time in Alaska's radio history, can hear 
a "game of the day" from the lines of the Liberty Broadcasting 
System. The games are sponsored on Sundays by Blatz Beer, with 
Philip Morris a participating sponsor on the Saturday games via the 
Alaska Broadcasting System (KIFW. Sitka; KFQD, Anchorage; 
KFRB, Fairbanks; KTKN, Ketchikan; KINY, Juneau; KIBH, 
Seward) . 

Soap opera is brought to Alaskan women through Procter & Gam- 
ble's sponsorship of Life Can Be Beautiful (Tide). This daytime 
serial is heard on KFAR, Fairbanks, and KENI, Anchorage. 

The influx of spot advertisers continues with national brands on 
the ABS stations including Procter & Gamble; Hills Brothers coffee: 
Lucky Lager beer; Whitehall Pharmacal (for Heet liniment. Anacin, 
Kolynos. and BiSoDoL). The Midnight Sun stations have recentlv 
added Procter & Gamble (Joy) ; J. B. Williams shaving products; 
Whitehall Pharmacal's Anacin. Heet, and BiSoDoL. 




COVERAGE 

Sure... We've Got It 

BUT... 

Like the Gamecock's 
Spurs... It's the 

PENETRATION 

WSPA Has 




In This - 

Prosperous 

BMB Report No. 2 Shows 
WSPA With The Largest 
Audience Of Any Station 
In The Area! 

AND... This Hooper 
Report Shows How WSPA 
Dominates This Area! 



HOOPER RATING -Winter 1949 

8:00 AM -• 12:00 N 63.2 

12:00 N - 6:00 PM 53.6 

(Monday thru Friday) 

6:00 PM •• 10:00 PM 67.6 

(Sunday thru Saturday) 



GIVE YOUR SALES 
A POTENT PERMANENT HYPO 



AIR YOUR WARES OVER 




s pftR 



T*NB' 



Represented By: 

John Blair & Co. 
Harry E. Cummings 

Southeastern Representative 

Roger A. Shaffer 

Managing Director 
Guy Vaughan, Jr., Sales Manager 



The No. 1 CBS Station For i 

The Spartanburg-Greenville 
Market L 



5,000 Watts -- 
950 On Your Dial 



2 JULY 1951 



17 



WEED 




YORK • BOSTON • CHICAGO 



ETROIT • SAN FRANCISCO 



ATLANTA • HOLLYWOOD 





Genial Jim k V s (rum Puff 

CRIST -* CRIST 1^ 
^Atvued you to //ett/L. I ' 

600/b900AtiMOH.&>SAT. 
UUFBR 







Most stations have them; 

hundreds of happy advertisers 

use them. Here-s the low-down on 

what makes them tiek 



spot 



The alarm clock clatters nois- 
ily — it's 7:00 a.m.! A man 
rubs his eyes briefly, flips 
back the covers, pops out of bed and 
across the room. Up goes a window 
and on comes the radio. 

"Now, up on the toes, str-e-t-c-h. 
down again. In time with the music — 
one-two-three-four. . . ." 

This scene would be hard to come 
upon in real-life today; but most of the 
adult population will recognize it as 
the early-morning calesthenic program, 
popular in radio's "B-eliminator" and 
"C-battery" days. 

For whatever reasons, interest in this 
brand of self-punishment has flagged 
to the point where stations no longer 
broadcast the necessary accompani- 



ment. Nevertheless, programs to "'get 
up and go to work to" remain a firm 
tradition among Americans. Some- 
thing the kids can listen to while dress- 
ing, Dad can catch while shaving, and 
Mom can hum to while breakfast 
cooks. 

Entertainment is only one reason, 
probably the least important, for ra- 
dio's loyal flock of early-morning lis- 
teners (for size of the audience, see 
Pulse sets-in-use figures for represen- 
tative markets I . What most of them 
expect — and get — is service: time, 
weather, and news. 

An extensive sponsor survey, just 
completed, shows how stations have 
built and held large breakfast-hour au- 
diences by blending service with en- 



tertainment. And the buying done by 
these regular listeners constitutes an 
impressive testimonial to the commer- 
cial effectiveness of radio's "morning 
men," and their "musical clock" broad- 
casts. 

Response to sponsor's question- 
naire was unusually widespread, indi- 
cating that musical clock shows are 
found on practically ever\ station in 
all parts of the country. Returns show- 
that the morning man operates some- 
time between 6:00 and 9:00 a.m. — 
some right through the entire three- 
hour period. Farm sections frequent- 
ly begin broadcasts even earlier, pro- 
vide market information as well as the 
usual news, weather, and time. 

Fabulous pitchman Arthur Godfr<\ 



2 JULY 1951 



19 




MUSIC IS MAJOR MORNING SHOW INGREDIENT. D.J., MUSIC LIBRARIAN, ANNOUNCER WORK AS TEAM AT WPAT, PATERSON, N.J. 



talked himself into his first network 
break partly on the strength of some 
tall early-hour persuading over Wash- 
ington's WJSV (since changed to 
WTOP ) . As close as historians can 
figure, it was 6:24 a.m. one Monday- 
morning in 1944 when light-hearted 
Arthur made an historic Enders Ra- 
zor announcement which was to help 
lift him to national fame. Despite the 
unseemly hour. 3,153 listeners wrote 
in for the razor that first day. After 



nine such announcements, the total of 
requests stood at 49,107 — an average 
of 5,456 requests per announcement. 
This was considered outstanding for 
the time and the product. 

A sampling of more up-to-date re- 
sults from similar programs is enough 
to warm the heart, and pocketbook, of 
any advertiser. 

A recent announcement campaign on 
WHBQ, Memphis, by Perel & Lowen- 
stein jewelers brought 261 mail-orders 



for their $39.75 watches. They racked 
up sales of $10.384.75 — at a cost of 
only $186. 

In Minneapolis. WCCO's Allen Gray 
sold more than 420 five-pound chunks 
of Bongard's Cheese at $3.00 apiece. A 
total of $1,260 worth of cheese, at last 
report, bought by listeners to the Sun- 
rise Salute section of this station's 
Housewives' Protective League pro- 
gram. (HPL is an established adver- 
tising vehicle on other CBS-affiliated 




ZANY GIMMICKS, PROPS BUILD POPULARITY. ( L. TO R.) ART BROWN, MARTHA & VERN, RAYBURN & FINCH SHOW INDIVIDUALITY 

20 SPONSOR 



Four variations front usual morning format 



He<\die Burri5 and. i 

6tu7A.M. II 30 t 

MONDAY THRU SAIbRDA" 




Tex & Jinx, WNBC, N.Y., man & wife team Live Western music peps up WHBQ listeners 
Marjorie Mills is one of few wake-up women Nat Williams gets up early, WDIA, Memphis 



stations in other areas as well.) 

Orders for 200 "Clipper Farm Fan- 
ning Mills" I at $75 each) rolled in to 
the Gurney Seed & Nursery Co. of 
Yankton. S. D.. when local station 
WNAX aired four commercials. Some 
SI 5.000 worth of merchandise sold for 
an advertising cost of $158.15. A sin- 
gle $12 morning announcement over 
the same station sold 13 combines for 
Francis Beehner of Sioux Falls to the 



tune of over $30,000. 

Sales results like these from all over 
the country could be multiplied indefi- 
nitely — bank loans, real estate, ciga- 
rette lighters, toilet article kits, oil 
burners, household gadgets. Most sta- 
tions say there isn't anything sold over 
the air today that can't be effectively 
promoted via early-morning shows. 
They back that up with actual results 
like those above. 



Typical Morning Men merchandising pieces 




Utt»n fvery M 




listen for Lloyd Grant, Master of Mirth on the 

■""^MBWU. AUIAHAC - 1VHAX-57I 

Brought to You at 7:45 a.m. by Your Local 

GAMBLE STORE 



£<Len Gfo r 



orning to Musical Almanac ■ ■ . 7.45 , 




1240 

( m, 

ISHER iW 

ON THE . <-*/ 

BREAKFAST W 

PARTY ni 

6:30 to 9:00 a.m. VI 



Every Weekday Mom™ 



Southeastern 




1 typical Morning Man 

A little over 10 months ago, Cleve- 
land's oldest station, WHK, predicted 
that its newest morning man would 
"turn the town upside down." 

Bill Gordon appears to have done 
just that. Just a few months ago the 
annual poll, conducted by Stan Ander- 
son of The Cleveland Press, tagged 
Gordon "Best Performer" and top D.J. 

How did he leapfrog into the num- 
ber one spot in Cleveland's smart, hot- 
ly competitive radio league — a league 
including some of the country's top 
stations? Only 26 years old, Gordon 
has a healthy physique, an equal I \ 
healthy ambition. Back from the Na- 
vy, he immediately plunged into radio 
work. Success as a d.j. on WHHM. 






* I vsess- 




^StBSf 






-j 



Memphis, led to more triumphs at 
WHBQ in the same city. He was a sen- 
sation. Finally WHK, Cleveland, beck- 
oned and he made the switch to the 



bigger market. 



Key to Bill Gordon's success is his 
reckless energy, an appreciation of the 
value of self-promotion, a well-devel- 
oped imagination, and a willingness to 
extend himself for his sponsors. 

A firm believer in gimmicks. Gor- 
don bombards 7:15 to 10:00 a.m. lis- 
teners with Count Basie's High Tide. 
Quacky the duck, Froggy, the sound of 
screaming women, horses, dogs, wolves, 
a kazoo, a clap-hands theme, and his 
"Stay Smoochie" slogan — just to men- 
tion a few. On top of this, listeners 
get a double "treat" when Gordon 
plays a record: he sings along with 
the pei formei "ii wax. 

A hard-plugging salesman, Gordon's 
selling triumphs include moving 07 
used cars for Lou Meliska in 13 weeks, 
during the middle of winter. To say 
nothing of the $(..00(1 worth of busi- 
ness Gordon promoted for Aeroways 
Fixing School, with two announce- 
ments costing S01. 20. Current!) Gor- 
don is sold out. 




SPONSOR PLUS: (I. to r.) Ed Slusarczylc, WIBX, Utica, is civil defense leader; B. Maye-, WGAR, Cleve., appears in stores; Don Bell, KRNT. Des Moines, throws anni 



Certain products seem to sell better 
than others, however. Says Harry E. 
Travis, production supervisor of 
WKZO, Kalamazoo: "'We feel that it 
is most effective to advertise the type 
i>f item which the listener can go right 
out and buy during the day, after hear- 
ing about it on the air." 

WKY, Oklahoma City expands on 
this: "We advertise almost wholly 
those products which deal with the 
household (not TV sets, etc.) but items 
such as cereals, pastry products, laxa- 
tives, toothpaste, shampoos, tea, etc. 
We try to stay with those products 
which will interest housewives, since 
they are our greatest listeners during 
this time." 

WTIC. Hartford, reports: "'Because 
ours is a breakfast-time program we 



are careful to restrict the commercial 
content to products palatable to break- 
fast-table listening. Present sponsors 
include a soap, bank, shaving prepara- 
tion, coal company, salt, and soda- 
cracker." 

Key factor in the success of an ear- 
ly-morning program is the personality 
of the performer who runs it. Prac- 
tically all of them are men — except for 
a few man and woman combinations 
(usually husband and wife). One sta- 
tion manager explains the male su- 
premacy by saying: "When people get 
out of bed half-awake, they prefer the 
more soothing tones of a man's bari- 
tone voice." 

Possessed of the proper voice, a 
"morning man" needs a friendly, in- 
formal manner; ability to "be him- 



self" while he ad libs his way through 
continuity and commercial. Good hu- 
mor is a quality often mentioned, with- 
out corny attempts to gag up the pro- 
gram and impose on listeners. The 
"smart aleck," egotistical type who 
talks down to the audience is univer- 
sally regarded as poison by experi- 
enced broadcasters. 

Irwin Cowper. assistant sales man- 
ager of WTIC, Hartford, describes the 
ideal morning man: "An m.c. should 
be a distinct individualist, chosen for 
his ability to turn a phrase, his natural 
wit, and above all, his salesmanship. 
These qualities are hard to define, but 
they are worth waiting for and seek- 
ing. This job calls for an all-around 
man who is good at everything, for the 
(Please turn to page 49) 



flow Morning Men programs "sets-in-use" compares with other times of dag 



Boston 



New York 



Philadelphia Washington, D.C. Atlanta 



Chicago 



New Orleans 



Cincinna 



6:00 



3.6 



6.7 



4.5 



11.2 



8.7 



8.0 



7.7 



5.9 



6:30 o.m. 



7.0 



11.6 



6.9 



14.8 



10.7 



13.1 



9.5 



8.2 



7:00 a.m. 



17.2 



24.3 



17.5 



22.2 



16.2 



24.0 



17.7 



7.6 



7:30 a.m. 



20.8 



25.7 



20.5 



25.9 



17.0 



23.4 



20.4 



16.0 



8:00 a.m. 



22.4 



25.3 



18.6 



24.6 



25.6 



25.2 



25.9 



20.6 



8:30 a.m. 



22.3 



22.3 



17.3 



25.2 



24.3 



23.4 



25.0 



21.7 



9:00 a.m. 



27.8 



24.5 



22.2 



26.6 



27.7 



25.6 



30.4 



1 1 00 a.m. 



29.3 



30.5 



27.5 



25.4 



26.2 



22.2 



28.3 



27.5 



3:00 p.m. 



25.8 



20.6 



22.5 



21.7 



24.9 



19.2 



25.8 



22.6 ' 

J. 



8:00 p.m. 



25.0 



24.7 



19.3 



24.8 



30.0 



23.0 



44.3 



20.3 



Source: Pulse (figures are for Much-April 1951 except New York which is May 1951 



Picture album of American Morning Men 




j Ed Brown, WJJJ, Montgomery, honors local groups 










Why Morning Men are a good hug 



1. Sets-in-use are substantial; turnover is high, 4. Morning men attract loyal listeners; their per- 
ensuring good audience. sonalized sales pitches bring effective results. 

2. Considered "fringe" time, early morning pe- 5. Caught at the beginning of the day, a house- 
riods are classified C or D on rate card, making wife is primed to buy a product just before she 
them economical. goes out shopping. 

3. In TV markets there's no problem of television 6. Every product and service has been sold on 
cutting in on the audience. The visual medium musical clock programs — they catch the whole 
still doesn't get up that early. family. 



Louis 


San Francisco 


Los Angeles 


9.8 


5.5 


5.0 


11.5 


9.5 


8.4 


18.2 


20.6 


13.7 


16.2 


20.9 


15.4 


23.9 


22.3 


19.4 


23.6 


21.6 


20.4 


26.4 


22.5 


24.9 



22.7 


28.7 


26.6 


21.2 


22.7 


22.2 


29.3 


30.5 


22.5 








■i — ^B 







I. Fred Haseltine, Richmond; 2. Creighton Stewart, WCAU, Phila.; 3. Wally King, KSFO, S.F.; 
4. Ed Meath, WHEC, Rochester; 5. Howdy Roberts, WMT, Cedar Rapids, la.; 6. Denny Sulli- 
van, WFBL, N.Y.; 7. Bob Steele, WTIC, Hartford; 8. Bill Fountain, WKY, Okla. City; 9. Bob 
Hamilton, WDSU, New Orleans; 10. Grady Cole, WBT, Charlotte, N. C; II. Sam Beard, 
WPTF, Raleigh; 12. George Mahoney, WSJS, Winston-Salem; 13. Lee Adams, KMOX, St. 
Louis; 14. Ross Mulholland, KMPC, LA. 




GRAY & ROGERS TO THE RESCUE: WHEN STORM STRUCK, ADMEN ERICKSON, WORRELL, ROGERS PHONED SPECIAL BELL ANNOUNCE 



Bell Telephone's party line 



PART TWO 

OF A TWO-PART SERIES 



Only a few of the 18 regional phone companies use 

radio in a big way; but the others are catching' on fast 




One Sunday last November. 
I a gale lashed across the Stale 

of Pennsylvania, ripping 
down wiic>. flooding the streets, and. 
among other destruction, wreaking 
havoc on telephone service. As the 
' risis boiled up, the Traffic Division of 
the Mel I Telephone Compan) of I'enn- 
sylvania aroused the regional corn- 
pan) s advertising manager, Karl A. 
Skinner, at his suburban home, lie in 
turn alerted Edmund !l. Rogers, senior 
partner and head of the radio/TV de- 



24 



partment of Gray & Rogers, the Bell 
company's ad agency in Philadelphia. 
Within scant minutes, ad manager 
Skinner was racing his car through 
slipper) roads to his Philadelphia of- 
fice. On his part. radio/TV chief Rog- 
ers alerted Walter M. Erickson, the 
agenc) timebuyer, and Granville Wor- 
rell, the agenc) contact chief on the 
Bell account. In swift order, these 
three collected in the agency's office 
in the towering Philadelphia Saving 
Fund Societ) Building on South 



Twelfth Street to take quick action. 

Rapidly, they put together a 20-sec- 
ond station break. They cleared it 
with Skinner. Then each sat down to 
phone in that announcement to every 
radio station in the path of the storm. 

"This is a message from the Bell 
Telephone Company."" flashed the bul- 
letin over some 90 stations. "We re- 
gret the inconvenience caused by the 
storm to those whose service has been 
interrupted. All available manpower 
and material are being used to restore 

SPONSOR 






[PENNSYLVANIA RADIO STATIONS (SEE TEXT) 



service as quickly as possible. Thank 
you." 

For two days, the ad manager and 
the ad agency worked hand-in-hand to 
help alleviate the crisis. Constantly in- 
formed by the Bell Traffic Department, 
they followed up with fresh tailor-made 
messages. These were dispatched to 
radio stations in local areas through- 
out the state as conditions improved, 
and more telephone lines went back in- 
to service. Finally, the emergency was 
over, and, with a sigh of relief, the 
admen returned to their more orderly 
routine — until the next crisis. 

This dramatic episode reflects a typi- 
cal function of the regional broadcast 
advertising done by the 18 associate 
companies of the Bell Telephone Sys- 
tem. As was pointed out in Part I of 
this article (see the last issue of spon- 
sor, 18 June), the 18 Bell companies 
jointly sponsor the $1,250,000 Tele- 
phone Hour on the NBC radio network 
as a nation-wide open wire. The show 
serves a friend-making, friend-keeping 
purpose, informing the public of serv- 
ices provided by the Bell System. 
(Please turn to page 44) 



Hon* typical Bell ad managers operate 




N. Y.'s Monser 




Michigan's Wallis 




Penn.'s Skinner 




Edward L. Monser, 47, advertising manager for New 
York Telephone Company, believes in blanketing the 
state with announcements. The company spends 
over $350,000 annually for messages broadcast regu- 
larly over 98 radio, six TV stations. Born Leaven- 
worth, Kan., graduate of Cornell, Columbia Journal- 
ism School, he joined N. J. Bell in 1929 as copy- 
writer and became AT&T ad copy supervisor in 1944. 



F. G. Wallis, advertising manager of Michigan Bell 
Telephone Company since 1950, uses radio program- 
ing, plus state-wide radio announcements, plus TV 
announcements over six stations. The company, 
spending about $350,000, relies heavily on variety 
show, Number Please, on 18 AM stations. A Colum- 
bia Journalism School graduate, he joined N. Y. Bell 
1929, entered AT&T's ad department in 1943. 



Earl A. Skinner, advertising manager of Bell Tele- 
phone Company of Pennsylvania, veteran of 20 years 
with the company, is heavy user of radio announce- 
ments. Spending $150,000. the company schedules 
three-per-week announcements on 59 Penn. stations, 
two weekly on 33 stations, varying on five Delaware 
stations. He favors transcribed messages, uses some 
live. He feels radio is top public relations medium. 



Anson F. Hardman, advertising manager of Ohio Bell 
Telephone Company since 1947, uses variety of 
broadcast efforts. Company's $300,000 annual air 
budget includes five-times weekly participation pro- 
graming on WEWS, Cleveland; radio announcements 
through Buckeye State; TV announcements in four 
cities; and three-times weekly Ohio Story on 13 radio 
stations. He is proud of awards won by Ohio Slory. 



Ohio's Hardman 



How 18 Bell Telephone companies use spot radio 



(Source: AT&T 
survey, still be- 
ing conducted) 



1 . Companies using 
spot announce- 
ments as traffic 
control, to warn 
of emergencies. 

2. Companies using 
spot announce- 
ments to promote 
usage, space sales 
of classified di- 
rectories. 

3. Companies using 
spot announce- 
ments to recruit 
new personnel. 

4. Companies using 
spot announce- 
ments detailing 
information about 
party line, long 
distance service. 

5. Companies using 
spot announce- 
ments to help 
solve the long 
distance call-by- 
number problem. 

6. Companies spon- 
soring radio pro- 
grams to boost 
Bell service with- 
in region. 






o° \ 6 



v° s° <* ** ^ 




xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 


X XXX *X X X 


y x x x x 






XXXXXXXXXXXXX xxxx 


X XXX XX 


X x 




Kobak (above) urges radio, sponsors work together to make beautiful music at the cash register 

26 




Ed Kobak, consult; 



What lies ahead for ra- 
dio? Is the medium 
which has helped build many of 
the nation's most important firms 
limping down the road to obsoles- 
cence — as many scare articles in 
the press would seem to indicate? 
Or, is radio entering on a new 
phase of constructive adjustment 
to television and continued power 
as an ally of business? 

Decision makers on both the 
selling and buying sides of the 
fence ace vitally concerned about 
the answers. For the plans of both 
broadcasters and advertisers de- 
pend to much the same degree on 
what happens to radio. This point 
is frequently overlooked. Wails of 
despair from the halls of radio 
management are heard every- 
where; but what of the heads of 
firms which have millions of dol- 
lars invested in radio franchises 
which they still consider their most 
valuable selling vehicles? They, 
too, have a vested interest in and 
sincere good wishes for the con- 
tinued prosperity of the radio me- 
dium. 

To get an over-all analysis of ra- 
dio's problems, sponsor inter- 
viewed a man whose career has 
embraced every facet of radio — 
Edgar Kobak. He has been presi- 
dent of the Mutual Broadcasting 
System; vice president in charge 
of sales of NBC; vice president of 
Lord & Thomas. Today he is a 
business consultant for. among 
others, two firms which are lead- 

SPONSOR 



poiisor really down on radio? 

top advertisers, says "no/' eiting flabbiness of 

broadcasters in selling' man who foots the bill 



ing buyers of radio time — Miles 
Laboratories and General Mills. 
And, he is owner of a radio sta- 
tion, WTWA, Thomson, Ga. 

sponsor asked Ed Kobak to 
look at radio's present turmoil not 
as a former radio executive and an 
active member of radio committees 
(he is chairman of the board of 
BAB, Inc. and a member of the 
Affiliates Committee) ; not as a 
business adviser to firms which 
buy millions of dollars worth of 
advertising annually; but rather as 
a businessman equipped to look in- 
to radio's past, and its future, with 
perspective. Here, then, are ques- 
tions sponsor put to Ed Kobak 
with the answers in his own words. 

Q. What single thing would you point 
to as radio's chief trouble right now? 

Kobak: The simple fact of the matter 
is that the men who sell radio do not 
understand their medium as well as 
the men who buy it. Too few sellers 
just don't know what happens once an 



advertising message leaves their broad- 
cast towers. 

Q. That sounds like a serious lack, 
but just why do you consider it so im- 
portant? 

Kobak: In effect, most radio salesmen 
are operating in the dark. They don't 
understand how radio is working for 
advertisers. They don't know the needs 
of advertisers. They are unable to go 
in and sell some specific plan that will 
get new business coming into radio. 
All most radio salesmen can do is try 
to snipe at the other networks ac- 
counts, though there are exceptions. 

Q. Does that mean you think there's 
radio business to be had which is go- 
ing down the drain for lack of analyti- 
cal and creative salesmanship? 

Kobak: There is, and I can give you 
a good example. Recently, Miles Lab- 
oratories bought time on Mutual for 
taped rebroadcast of its Curt Massey 
show which is on CBS live. Now, no- 
tice I said bought. I don't mean that 
Miles was sold on the idea by any sales- 
man. Miles went to radio; not the 
other way around. While salesmen 



What Kobak suggests to radio nmnagement 

Advertisers aren't nearly the men with horns many broadcasters suspect 
they are. Rather, the broadcasters themselves are often to blame for the 
sales difficulties they now face. Here are suggestions Ed Kobak makes. 



1. Sell with ideas. Study the prob- 
lems of advertisers so that you 
can make specific suggestions to 
them for more advertising rather 
than making deals. 

2. Make lots of calls with your 
chin up. Remember, you compli- 
ment the buyer's good sense when 
you ask him to buy radio. 

3. Let advertisers know the eco- 
nomic facts of life of radio. Tell 



them about your cost problems so 
that they can understand why 
rates can't be cut further. 

4. Work to change the psycholog- 
ical climate among advertisers. 
Many plans are motivated by im- 
pressions advertisers get. Help 
them get good impressions. 

."». Programs are what you have to 
sell. Ruild new shows, constantly 
refurbish old ones. 



were calling on the agency, it was to 
get Miles back to MBS, not to launch 
a new show. 

Miles bought the new time because 
analysis of Nielsen food and drug in- 
dex figures showed that there was a 
good opportunity for the firm if it in- 
vested more money in radio to sell 
Alka-Seltzer. As you know, with these 
figures management can keep abreast 
of a product's standing in relation to 
competitive brands as far as sales and 
advertising are concerned. The Miles 
management knew more about their 
opportunities through added use of ra- 
dio than the radio salesmen did. 

Q. What other weaknesses do you see 
in radio's approach to its problems? 

Kobak: Well, it's all really the same 
problem — poor selling. Let's go back 
to what happened to Miles. After the 
recent cut in network rates, Miles found 
itself with a substantial annual saving. 
With all that extra money available, 
you'd have thought sosieone at the net- 
works would have been hopping a train 
down to Elkhart. Indiana, to sell Miles 
on a new show. But the pitches Miles 
{Please turn to page 59 I 




2 JULY 1951 



Kobak (with H. Kaiser above) knows problems 



21 




UUJcUIIVc i to obtain valuable information like this ^™" to help solve problems like this (where TV commercial pulled weaker than radio) 



How Schwerin does it 

Picture series on these pages shows how an advertiser takes 
the guesswork out of his commercials and program 



The pictures on these pages 
show a group of average 
Americans enjoying the unique experi- 
t'liir ul telling ii sponsor off ahout his 
program and commercials. While vent- 
ing their spleen land, probably, toss- 
ing some orchids I these citizens are 
helping the sponsor use the air more 
elieetheh . \s ; i t\ pical Schwerin test 
panel, their reactions will be scientifi- 
cally charted and analyzed to provide 



a basis for program and commercial 
improvement. 

These pictures were taken a short 
time ago at the first evening test ses- 
sion held at Schwerin Research Cor- 
poration's new test theatre, a former 
New York motion picture house. Just 
how important to advertisers are tests 
like this? For a quick answer, here 
are some brief case histories which 
tell about results of Schwerin tests. 



I hey range all the way from the case 
of the soap manufacturer looking for 
a new daytime radio serial to the sad 
tale of the TV sponsor with a "boom- 
eranging" commercial. 

Take the soap maker looking for an 
effective daytime radio vehicle for his 
product. 

• First step taken by the Schwerin 
organization was to try out a dozen 
likely "soap operas" on typical house- 





1 
[pi, 


1 con attend 
Pleote tend . 
ANT DAY 

a 

ate chock your 


DIIACM MONO THIS UNI 

"Telovitlon Radio Unlaw lima." 

lickoil lot an AFTERNOON Q on EVENING D 

Monday Tuetday Wednetday Thundoy 

a a a a 

choice) 




Friday 

D 






? 


My occupallo 
(II you at. a 


Houtewile, c 


heck hat 


D ondg 


ve yout Hutbond 


t otcupolion 


on 


the Mm above) 




3. 


My oge in 


Undc 


t 16 O 


16 J5 C 


U15 a 


36-50 D 


Ov 


•t 50 D 




Mr. 

».. 

Mil 


N« 

□ 

i 1 


to tend Ihe "I. 

Nam* (pie 
Addtett 


levition-Rodi 


a Review 


Timo" litte 


■ lei 

•hone No 





































































I. Card returned by prospective panelist helps recruit balanced group 




28 



— . Panel members line up outside converted theatre for 7:15 p.m. show 

SPONSOR 



wife audiences. One showed up as 
more interesting to the audience than 
all the rest and it was therefore chosen 
for sponsorship. 

Then came a follow-up test, once 
the show was on the air. Although 
generally approving of the show, panel 
members now found things about it 
that needed improvement. As a result 
of their candid criticisms, the story 
line was changed somewhat: one main 
character was completely eliminated 
because he aroused extreme dislike; 
and a new actress took over in the 
leading role. 

After these changes were made, the 



programs rating took a substantial 
upward turn. 

• Another advertiser had adapted 
his very successful radio show to tele- 
vision. How was the video version 
making out? Schwerin found the sales 
points in this sponsor's TV commer- 
cials not nearly as well remembered as 
those on the older radio version. Rea- 
son: a radio approach to the TV com- 
mercial, with pictures added later to 
fill in the visual end. A more unified 
approach to sight and sound licked 
this problem. 

• Then there was the sponsor with 
an apparently successful radio pro^ 



gram. Periodic checks of entertain- 
ment and commercial by Schwerin s 
panels showed the program doing an 
effective job. But, thought the spon- 
sor, I'm not so sure the singing star 
is the best man for the show. As a re- 
sult, the singer's contract was not re- 
newed and a new star took over the 
program. Tests immediately detected 
a drop in "liking" for the new star, 
consequently for the entire program. 
Replacing the original singer brought 
the "liking" back up to its former 
level. 

• An appliance manufacturer de- 
vised an ingenious test demonstration 




3. M.C. EXPLAINS TEST PROCEDURE. KIDS TYPICALLY GRAB FRONT SEATS, GIVIN 

2 JULY 1951 



5E IDEA OF THE PANEL MAKE-UP 

29 



more 




I. Test is on. Note how woman made herself at home while recording reactions 




6. Exar 



for his product on television. It com- 
pared his product with an ''unknown" 
brand, setting up certain safeguards to 
make conditions the same for both. 
One of these was a careful sealing of 
all openings on both appliances with 



heavy tape. Someone pointed out huw 
time-consuming it would be to have 
the fragile model in the TV commer- 
cial actually tear all this tape off — so 
it was loosened beforehand to make the 
job easier. It was easy: the tape prac- 



II ho uses tests; how mueh do they cost? 

1. Schwerin Research Corp. clients for program-commercial testing 
service include such companies as A.T.&T., Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, 
Miles Laboratories, General Mills, Lever Brothers, Admiral Corp., 
INBC, Toni Company, Campbell Soup Company. 

2. How much does it cost? Basic charge for a "test hour" is $1,500, 
minus varying discounts if series of tests is contracted for. Dis- 
counts run like this: 10% off for 12 test hours; 12% off for 18; 
and 15% off for 25 hours. 

3. A 30-minute radio program, tested for entertainment only, is rated 
at 30 test minutes or $750 on a single-shot basis. Same program, 
tested also for commercial effectiveness on one product is rated at 
40 test minutes or $1,000 for single test. Add 10 minutes for each 
addilional product on the same program. 

4. A 30-minute television program, tested for entertainment only, is 
valued ;it 10 test minutes or $1,000 for one session. If commer- 
cial effectiveness on one product is included, same program is 
Valued at 54 test minutes or $1,350. For each additional product 
studied on a TV show, 14 test minutes are added. 



30 



over. Panel members get small token of appreciation 



tically fell off when the model-demon- 
strator pulled at it. 

"Fake, phony," cried the Schwerin 
test panel which viewed a kinescope of 
this show. Loosening the tape had 
kept the commercial from going over- 
time; but it had boomeranged on be- 
lievability. Schwerin pointed out. 

What would tests like those de- 
scribed above cost? Base price is 
$1,500 per test hour, for a single test. 
A contract for several tests lowers this 
price, so that 25 test hours would bring 
the maximum discount of 15%. Spe- 
cifically, testing a 30-minute radio pro- 
gram for entertainment only would 
cost $750; including commercials in 
the test would add 10 test-minutes, 
boosting total one-shot cost to $1,000. 
TV programs, since the) re more com- 
plex, cost more. A 30-minule television 
test is billed! at 40 test-minutes or 
$1,000 for an entertainment survey 
alone; with commercial, too. the tab 
comes to $1,350. Programs of other 
lengths vary, not always in proportion. 

Current Schwerin clients include, 
among others. Admiral Corporation, 
American Telephone & Telegraph. 

(Please turn to page 55) 

SPONSOR 



©SPONSOR Publication! Inc. 



1951 TV lexicon is over three times as long' 

as first edition of Herbert True dictionary 



DICTIONARY APPEARS IN FOUR PARTS 

PART THREE 



■P%A I'" you know whal "drooling," "fax," and 
i jK "gobo" mean in the parlance "I television? \ 
glance through the definitions in this issue's in- 
stallment of the 1951 "TV Dictionary/Handbook for 
Sponsors" will provide the answers. It will also give you 
quickly grasped and valuable TV data. Example: the 
film conversion figures on page 35. 

Authored by Herbert True. Gardner Advertising Com- 



pany. St. Louis, radio-TV writer and producer, the 1951 
dictionary is a greatly expanded (over three times as 
long) version of True's first dictionary — published pre- 
viously in SPONSOR. 

• The complete "TV Dictionary /Handbook for Spon- 
sors" will be available to subscribers on request. Price 
to others: $2.00. Bulk rates furnished on request. 



D 

{Continued ) 

DROOLING Padding a show with un- 
important talk or skits in order to fill 
the allotted time. 

DRY RUN Those rehearsals previous 
to camera rehearsals where business, 
lines, sets, etc., are perfected. 

DUBBING Mixing several sound tracks 
and recording on a single film. 

DUPE A duplicate negative film print 
made from existing positive. 

DUPE NEGATIVE Negative of a film 
which is not the original negative; 
negative made from a positive print. 

DUPING PRINT Special soft print 
(lavender or fine grain) made from an 
original negative so that a dupe nega- 
tive can subsequently be made from it. 

DUTCHMAN Cloth strip, about three 
to six inches wide, pasted over the 
crack between two flats to hide the 
crack and to make the wall appear 
solid. 



E 



EDITING Final arranging, shortening, 
and eliminating of scenes in a TV kine 
or film and synchronizing them with 
the sound track. While "editing" is 
often used inter-changeably with "cut- 
ting," a cutter is specifically one who 
does the manual part of the work. 

EDGE FLARE 1 1 1 Unwanted lights at 
edge of picture. ( 2 ) May be countered 
by edge lighting which consists of a 
small lamp illuminating the edge of 
the mosaic. <3> Rim of illumination 
around the edge of the picture on the 
receiver tube. 

EFFECTS Tricks or techniques used in 
changing film scenes, usually with the 
use of special cards, plates, etc., on a 
film negative. Also called opticals. 

"802" The New York local of the 
American Federation of Musicians. 

EIGHTY-EIGHT Slang for piano; de- 
rived from the number of piano keys. 

ELECTRA-ZOOM A type of Zoomar or 
variable lens designed for studio use. 
(See lenses.) 



ELECTRON BEAM A stream of elec- 
trons focused in the shape of a beam 
by external electrostatic or magnetic 
fields. Also known as the cathode-ray 
beam. 

ELECTRON GUN A system of metallic 
cylinders arranged in the narrow ends 
of both the camera and receiving 
tubes, in which is formed the electron 
beam which is ultimately used for 
scanning the image before the TV 
camera and for reproducing it in the 
TV receiver. 

EMCEE or M.C. Master of ceremonies 
on a TV production. 

EPISODE Series of related scenes 
which are supposed to make up an 
event of importance in the story. 

ESTABLISHING SHOT Long shot intro- 
duced at the beginning of a scene to 
establish the inter-relationship of de- 
tails to be shown subsequently in near- 
er shots. 

E.T. Abbreviation for electrical tran- 
scription. Usually 33-1 3 rpm's. 



2 JULY 1951 



31 







WORLD STATIONS ARE 
MAKING MONEY WITH 
THESE JINGLES NOW I 

• HOME IMPROVEMENT 
JINGLES CAMPAIGN 

• FUR STORAGE 
SERVICES JINGLES 

• FLORIST YEAR-ROUND 
CAMPAIGN 

• FARM PRODUCTS 
SIGNATURES 

• APPAREL LINES YEAR- 
ROUND CAMPAIGN 

• BEAUTY SHOP 
PROMOTION JINGLES 

• FURNITURE STORES 
JINGLES 

More Money-Makers I 

• LOAN COMPANIES 
JINGLES 

• USED CAR DEALERS 
JINGLES 

• BAKERS JINGLES 

• CREDIT CLOTHIERS 
(MEN) JINGLES 

• JEWELERS JINGLES 

• SAFETY JINGLES 
CAMPAIGN 

• CREDIT CLOTHIERS 
(WOMEN) JINGLES 

And More! 

• WORLD MUSICAL 
WEATHER JINGLES 

• FURRIERS CAMPAIGN 

• FOOD PRODUCTS 
JINGLES CAMPAIGN 

• HOMEMAKING JINGLES 
CAMPAIGN 

• BASEBALL SIGNATURES 
CAMPAIGN 

• SPORTS SIGNATURES 
CAMPAIGN 

• HAPPY BIRTHDAY 
JINGLES CAMPAIGN 

• WORLD MUSICAL 
TIME SIGNALS 

• KIDDIE PRODUCTS 
SIGNATURES CAMPAIGN 

• FOOTBALL SIGNATURES 
CAMPAIGN 

• BASKETBALL SIGNATURES 
CAMPAIGN 



• « 0Rl mh> NJORt 



these pow< 



M* 









«{g, # 




M<^» a W0z:?£> 



7385 adve ::;:tVo«io ■»*• <° mpoi9ns 



i 

3 



fl** 



Rt«,UA T£S 



S 



a 



/ 




0H\ 3 GRtAT 




SPOMSOR-SU\WG 

JINGLES. 



How Ready 



\, to School Compaq 

torVea-RaondUse. s 



AND HERE ARE MORE 
SALES PRODUCERS 
AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY 
AT WORLD STATIONS/ 

• CHRISTMAS SHOPPING 
JINGLES 

• CHRISTMAS SALES 
JINGLES 

• FOOD PRODUCTS 
CHRISTMAS CAMPAIGN 

• TOYS AND CHRISTMAS 
GIFTS CAMPAIGN 

• CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS 
AND GIFTS JINGLES 

And More Money 
Makers/ 

• VALENTINE'S DAY 
JINGLES 

• EASTER GIFT JINGLES 

• EASTER APPAREL 
PROMOTION JINGLES 

• MOTHER'S DAY 
JINGLES 

• GRADUATION DAY 
JINGLES 

• JUNE WEDDING 
JINGLES 

• FATHER'S DAY 
JINGLES 



) 



Time-Buyers! Account Executi 



.lion It your best for top qual- 
ily'shows locally. Check your WORID station for the new 
Robert Montgomery .how, "FREEDOM IS OUR BUSINESS," 
"Steamboat Jamboree," the "Dick Haymes Show," "For- 
ward America" and the "lyn Murray Show." WORID Com- 
mercial Jingles, another WBS special feature, include time 
and weather attention-getters and all manner of arresting 
sponsor-identification for jewelers, furriers, automobile 
dealers, furniture stores, apparel shops and many more 



THF RATINGS, THE KNOW-HOW! 



i 



I 



1 



I 



PROGRAM SERVICE 

WORLD BROADCASTING SYSTEM, INC. 

488 Madison Avenue, New York 22, New York 






They helped build the TV Dictionary Handbook 




R. B. HANNA, Mgr., WRGB-TV, Schenectady C. MacCRACKEN, v.p. radio/TV, DC&S, N.Y. H. McMAHAN, Exec, Five-Star Prod., Hywd. 



EXPANDING SQUARE Film effect 
wherein an image becomes visible as 
it replaces previous picture from small 
expanding square out. 

EXPLANATORY TITLE A title inserted 
during a program, between actions or 
scenes, explaining something not made 




clear in action. Poor taste usually and 
such titles are seldom used in televi- 
sion. 

EXPOSITION Explanation of what is 
to follow, frequently by narration 
voice over, laying groundwork for the 
story. 



FAC or FAX Full studio facilities. 

FADE TO BLACK Popular method of 
ending TV dramatic presentations 
where picture is gradually faded down 
until the screen is black. In TV it's 
done electronically; in motion pictures, 
optically. 



FADE UP, FADE DOWN 

dio fades of mikes. 



Refers to au- 



FADER or POT Instrument used to 
lower to raise sound level. 

FADES — Television: 

In: The TV screen is dark and the 
picture gradually appears to full 
brightness. 



Out: From full brightness a picture 
disappears gradually until the screen 
is dark. 

Film: Fade in and outs, dissolves or 
mixes are normally made optically in 
film laboratory on an 'optical printer' 
and are usually called opticals. Trick 
shots are also mainly optically done. 
In films 'mix' and 'dissolve' are synon- 
ymous and denote a gradual transtion 
from one scene to another, both scenes 
being visible in a superimposed state 
for a period during the middle of the 
transition. 

FAIRY GODMOTHER An unimaginative 
musical director. 

FAKE or FAKING Arrangement of ar- 
ticles or material in an unnatural man- 
ner that when photographed passes as 
authentic. A legitimate artifice to 
make the unreal appear real. 

FALSE CEILING Term used to describe 
devices such as partial ceilings, etc., 
which are used to create the effect of 
a room completely enclosed from above 
without affecting an actual covering 
which would prevent effective over- 
head lighting. 

FAN — Uncritical enthusiast for TV tal- 
ent, show, or presentation. 

FANFARE A few bars of music usually 
employing plenty of trumpets to her- 
ald start of TV show, an entrance, or 
special announcement. 

FANTASY An imaginative TV presen- 
tation not restricted by realistic con- 
ventions. Usually one dealing with 
mythology or the supernatural. 

FARCE TV comedy designed strictly 
for laughs and not concerned with 
plausible characters or probabilities of 
plot. 

FAT Meaning to have sure-fire jokes, 
easy lines to deliver, or simple sound 
effects. 

FEARLESS DOLLY The most flexible 
and satisfactory of the less expensive 
motion picture boom-type dollys, of- 
fering limited elevation of camera on 
short boom. 



FEED To transmit a TV show to sta- 
tions or groups of stations. 

FEED BACK The squeal or howl re- 
sulting from accidentally closing the 
inbound and outbound ends of an 
electrical circuit, or from an improper 
mike set-up. 

FIDELITY The exactness with which 
a television or radio-transmission sys- 
tem reproduces sound or picture on the 
receiver. 

FIELD (1) Program-wise, the area of 
set or scene covered by the camera as 
seen on the receiver tube, depending 
on the type of lens and distance of the 
camera from the scene. < 2 ) Refers to 
one set of scanning lines making up a 
part of the final picture. In present 
standards, pictures are transmitted in 
two fields of alternating lines which 
are interlaced to form a 525-line pic- 
ture at the rate of 30 complete pic- 
tures or frames per second. 

FIELD PICKUP or REMOTE The trans- 
mission of out-of-studio events by a 
mobile unit, and cameras. 

FIGHT THE MUSIC To struggle in 
singing; (said of an actor) to be dis- 
turbed in speaking lines above a musi- 
cal background. 



FILL 

rial. 



Cut to insert additional mate- 



FILL-IN LIGHT Spots or lights used to 
soften shadows, usually 3/4 KW or 2 
KW. 

FILM CAMERA CHAIN Complete series 
of equipment used to present films on 
television, consisting of iconoscope 
camera, camera control, and shading 
desk, and one or more projectors. Fre- 
quently a slide projector is mounted 
beside the film projector so that sta- 
tion announcement slides may be 
shown over same circuit. 

FILM COMMERCIAL Advertising mes- 
sage placed on film for projection over 
the film facilities of television station. 

FILM CUE Perforation in film to indi- 
cate time remaining. 



34 



SPONSOR 




RAY RICH, Prog. Mgr., WDSU-TV, New Or. LEE RUWITCH, v.p., Gen. Mgr., WTVJ, Miami W. J. SCROGIN, Serv. Mgr., United Film, K.C. 



/ »iin information 



Timing and Word Allowance 
Chart for 16mm TV Filmed 
Commercials and Shows. 



Feet 


Seconds 


Words 


1 


01.7 


4 


2 


03.3 


8 


3 


05.0 


12 


4 


06.7 


16 


5 


08.3 


20 


6 


10.0 


24 


7 


11.7 


28 


8 


13.3 


32 


9 


15.0 


36 


10 


16.7 


40 


11 


18.3 


44 


12 


20.0 


48 


13 


21.7 


52 


14 


23.3 


56 


15 


25.0 


60 


16 


26.7 


64 


17 


28.3 


68 


18 


30.0 


72 


19 


31.7 


76 


20 


33.3 


80 


21 


35.0 


84 


22 


36.7 


88 


23 


38.3 


92 


24 


40.0 


96 


25 


41.7 


100 


26 


43.3 


104 


27 


45.0 


108 


28 


46.7 


112 


29 


48.3 


116 


30 


50.0 


120 


31 


51.7 


124 


32 


53.3 


128 


33 


55.0 


132 


34 


56.7 


136 


35 


58.3 


140 


36 


60.0 


144 


Feet 


Minutes 


Words 


45 


1:15 


180 


54 


1:30 


216 


63 


1:45 


252 


72 


2:00 


288 


81 


2:15 


324 


90 


2:30 


360 


99 


2:45 


396 


108 


3:00 


432 


144 


4:00 


576 


180 


5:00 


720 


360 


10:00 


1440 


390 


10:50 


1560 


522 


14:30 


2088 


1062 


29:30 


4248 



CONVERSION FACTORS To find 16mm 
ft., multiply 35mm ft. by 40%. To find 
35mm ft., multiply 16mm ft. by 2Y 2 . 
One 35mm ft. equals 2/3 of a second. 
(Number of 35mm ft. times 2/3 equals 
seconds of screening time.) One second 
equals IV2 35mm. ft. (Number of sec- 
onds time IV2 equals the amount of 35 
mm ft.) One 35mm ft. equals 16 frames. 
One 16mm ft. equals 40 frames. 24 
frames projected a second. Ninety 35mm 
ft. equals 60 seconds. Thirty-six 16mm 
ft. equals 60 seconds. One 16mm ft. 
equals 1-2/3 of a second. (Number of 
16mm ft. times 1-2/3 equals the screen- 
ing time in seconds.) One second equals 
6/10 of a 16mm ft. (Number of seconds 
times 6/10 equals the amount of 16mm 
ft.) 



VOICE INFORMATION Voice must al- 
ways be two seconds shorter than action. 
For example: 40 ft. 35mm playlet screens 
in 26-2/3 seconds but voice is read in 
37 ft. or in 24-2/3 seconds. 16 ft. 16mm 
playlet screens in 26-2/3 seconds but 
voice is read in 14-8/10 ft. or 24-2/3 sec- 
onds. Voice on a revoiced playlet is al- 
ways 2/3 of a second shorter than on 
original recording. < One 35mm ft. or 
2/5 16mm ft.) 

PROJECTION REMINDERS Takes 3 min- 
utes to warm up 16mm projector; 5 min- 
utes for 35mm projector. 8-second roll 
cues are necessary on 16mm sound film. 
Faster roll cue on 35mm sound or si- 
lent film. In TV 30 frames are projected 
a second and sound is 24 frames ahead 
of picture. Regular movie projection 
speed is 24 frames per second. 

WORD, SOUND ALLOWANCES Average 
word allowance (non-technical subjects) 
16mm film — 4 words per foot. 20-second 
film commercial has 17 seconds of 
sound. 8-second film commercial has 6 
seconds of sound. 



FILM LOOP A short piece of motion 
picture film spliced end to end to form 
a loop which is threaded on a projec- 
tor and run continuously during a 
show so it can be brought into the pic- 
ture sequence as desired. Usually used 
to establish locale or maintain montage 
effect. 

FILM PICKUP Electronic transmission 
of motion pictures from 16 or 35mm 
films by means of television. 

FILM SEQUENCE d) That portion of 
a telecast made up of various motion 
picture scenes. (2) In motion pictures 
the relation of various views of a scene 
which build into an incident climax. 

FILM STRIP A sequence of several 
35mm frames shown individually. Al- 
so called slides. 

FILTER MIKE Microphone rigged to 
give special effect of voice coming 
through telephone receiver or other 
varied effects. 

FILTERS TV lens filters used to elimi- 
nate or reduce glare or a portion of 
light spectrum. 

FIRE UP Direction to film man to 
warm up projector. Takes approxi- 
mately three minutes for 16mm; five 
minutes for a 35mm. An eight-second 
roll cue is necessary on 16mm sound 
film. Faster roll cues are possible on 
35mm sound, and all silent film. 

FISH BOWL The clients' observation 
booth with TV monitors. 

FISH HIM OUT Slang for send the 
boom down to pick up sound, but don't 
get boom or mike in picture. 

FIXED INSTALLATION Permanent set 
such as kitchen, newsroom, etc. 

FLACK The publicity writer for TV 
talent, show. etc. 

FLAG or GOBO Large sheet used to 
shade light from cameras. 

FLANGE A spool reel with both sides 
omitted so that film, usually commer- 
cials, wound on it may be removed in a 
roll for storage. 

I Please turn to page 61) 



2 JULY 1951 



35 



SEWING MACHINES 



SPONSOR: State Sewing Center AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Less than $20 had been 
spent via WOOF by sewing machine outlets in the sta- 
tion s three-year history. Then State ventured a three- 
announcements-per-day campaign. In three iveeks, the 
firm had so many leads they switched to a 15-minute seg- 
ment of Hillbilly Hit Parade. In less than 60 days, spend- 
ing $156, State reaped a $5,330 sales gross. And more 
than 100 leads remained to be called on at that point. 



WOOF, Dothan. Ala. 



PROGRAM: Announcements; 
Hillbilly Hit Parade 



RADIO 
RESULTS 



HELP WANTED 



SPONSOR: Columbian Vise & Mfg. Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPS1 II CASE HISTORY: Columbian's problem: to 
build up several of their departments requiring immedi- 
ate additional help. The Sunday Slovene program was 
the radio help-wanted column, with Columbian running 
two announcements. Cost: $25. The response was im- 
mediate 'lose to 300 inquiries the following day. The 
factor 1 ) superintendent reports he's very pleased at the 
way radio brought skilled help quickly and inexjwnsirely. 

WJMO, Cleveland PROGR \M: Slovene 



•1 



LIQUID PETROLEUM GAS 



SPONSOR: Rock Gas AGENCY: O'Brien 

I APSULE CASE HISTORY: Rod, Gas. an inexpensive 
heating and cooling fuel, is delivered in high pressure 
cylinders and is ideal where portability is desired. To 
reach ncu customers unaware <>f Rock Gas assets, the 
In in urn six announcements weekly for $72. Now Rock 
(,as reports sales increased b\ thousands of dollars, 100% 

over some oj the best previous years; sidesmen are being 

welcomed, til this when Roch Gas has been in business 

in I n in on i ci foi 25 years. 

I KNW, New Westminster, B. C. PROGRAM: Announcements 



REAL ESTATE 



SPONSOR: First Federal Savings & Loan AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: First Federal specializes in 
home loans. And, to build realtor goodwill, it offers time 
on its 7:45 a.m. newscast free to real estaters who want 
to mention specific offerings. One realtor, Sam King, 
booked a $15,000 listing one day, received a free plug on 
the newscast the next day, closed the sale that same day. 
Naturally, First Federal Savings & Loan handled the 
financing. Program cost, $20. 



WABB, Mobile 



PROGRAM: Newscast 



CONFECTIONERY 



SPONSOR: Hoffman Candy Co. AGENCY: Mayers Co. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Cup O' Gold is a 10* candy- 
bar on the market three years: sales till recently were 
3.000 24-6ar boxes iveekly. To up its totals. Hoffman 
bankrolled a Monday to Friday 15-minute segment of 
America Dances and a 15-minute Saturday portion of 
Strictly From Dixie. In three weeks, 62 new jobbing out- 
lets opened. In seven weeks, there were 4,000 new retail 
outlets. Sales now run to 7,500 boxes weekly and factory 
output is up 40%. Cost: about $330 iveekly. 



KFWB, Los Angeles 



PROGRAM: America Dances; 
Strictly From Dixie 



MUSICAL CARD 



SPONSOR: Wirt's Pharmacy AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This drug store sponsors a 
daily five-minute social calendar program. For the most 
part, commercials are of an institutional nature. But. 
recently, Wirt's received a shipment of musical greeting 
cards that play "Happy Birthday" when a crank is turned. 
The show's announcer played the jingle and casually men- 
tioned that the $1 cards were available. Three brief 
mentions sold 47 dozen cards for $564; cost: $6 daily. 



W \l(.\\. MchImII.. I'., 



PROGR \\l: Social Calendar 



POWER LAWN MOWERS 



s|>()\S()R : 1!. F. Goodrich Store AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The store manager featured 
n new shipment of power lawn mowers on his Morning 
Parade announcements. Two announcements advertised 
the equipment with M.C. John Woods suggesting pur- 
chasers liquidate the price of the mower by using it to do 
their neighbors' lawns. Apparently this sales gimmick 
worked; the Goodrich Store sold four mowers at $79.95 
and one at $125. From $24 worth of announcements: 
$444.80 in sales. 
WTAG. Worcester PROGRAM: John Woods' Morning Parade 




cbiossosofthicarounas 



ltCff »saN STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 
i^miOt,AT«ONAtnByRAD.D SALES 



37 



2 JULY 1951 




hi, BOB I OKI >l \\ 



As I've mentioned before, one of the 
most distressing effects continually be- 
ing achieved in television copy, both 
live and on film, is the insipid grin of 
pleasure which happy users of various 
products toss camera-ward. They may 
be freckle-faced moppets gorging cake, 
buxom girls tasting synthetic orange 
juice, or healthy young men downing 
beer. Unfortunately, even the Lunts 
couldn't get away with this brand of 
histrionics. Not that it isn't okay for 
an actor or actress to appear happy 
utilizing the sponsor's product, but the 
gestures are usually reminiscent of the 
school <>f acting of Lilyan Tashman. 

The main reason for this somewhat 
hammy approach to TV copy is, pri- 
marily, a thing known as "voice-over." 
Voice-over means having your audio 




PRODUCT: Rhcingold Beer (Liebmann 
Breweries) 

AGENCY: Foote, Cone & Belding, N. Y. 

PROGRAM: 10-second station identifica- 
tion announcements 

One of the most adroit spot buys and ap- 
propriate copy techniques for that buy being 
done in TV today is represented by Rhein- 
gold Beer's 10-second station identifica- 
tions. This product's ad-men. realizing that 
theirs i- iini' which need;- little elucidation, 
have spotted the Rheingold theme-line be- 
tween top-rating shows. For those lew who 
might nut know, this theme i-: "My beer is 
Rheingold, the dry beer!'", hence it fits just 
right in the four to eight seconds of audio 
permitted for station identifications. 

It would be nice if all channels which sell 
these quickies would require thi -.inn 
amount >>f copy, but the standards are as 
varied ;j- Joseph's coat. This makes the 
writing and production "f station identifica- 
tions far mure difficult than il should be. 
Hut to gel back to Rheingold, which has 
'-I 'i raft of these spots and inserted at- 
tention-getting personalities in them. The 
of the personalitii - are announced : 
"Peggj Lee sings:" and Peggy warbles the 
theme-line, acapella, to the music of the 



done by an announcer who is not seen. 
It's far cheaper on film and far easier 
to do both on film and live since folks 
who can actually speak on camera must 
be real actors and actresses able to talk 
as well as look pretty. Furthermore, 
they must be able to learn their lines 
and to deliver them as if they compre- 
hended their meaning, in addition to 
moving about naturally while they are 
talking. It is this burden on the act- 
ing profession which has forced so 
many advertisers into voice-over copy. 
When you stop to consider, it's only- 
natural that voice-over will weaken 
your copy. In the first place voice and 
action tend to get in each other's way. 
When they are in perfect synchroniza- 
tion, neither advances the story, the 
(Please turn to page 53) 



well-known Rheingold ditty. Here is ideal 
usage of a smart time-buy: not too many 
ideas worked into too little space (the way 
NBC pretzels do it) ; not too involved a 
thought (the way Beechnut gum does it). 
A gal, a label, and 10 words. That's just 
about right! 




SPONSOR: Ford Dealers of America 
AGENCY: J. Walter Thompson, N. Y. 
PROGRAM: "Ford Festival," NBC-TV 

Thi- Jame- Melton show (14 June, 1951), 
which seems to be smoothing out now, was 
far and away the most entertaining it's ever 

been . . . perhaps due to the lengthy film 
insert which look the audience inside the 
Walt Disne) Studios and divulged some of 
the behind-scenes business of doing anima- 
tion. Far from being of academic interest, 
and highlighted with full-animal' d excerpts 
from Alicc-In-\\ onderlaud. here was a TV 
treat of the first magnitude. 

Commercially Ford presented its usually 
sound and intelligent footage of the car get- 
ling ii> bumps and showing its style. 

The most interesting commercial vehicle 
this night was a brace of stunt-drivers doing 
the dramatic and dangerous wilh their fleet 



of Fords. No one could fail to be (a) in- 
terested (b) impressed — even when hearing 
the testimonial from the head stuntsman 
whose daring on the road was as apparent 
as his timorousness before the TV cameras. 
This live interview at the end of the com- 
mercial film served to point up the selling 
story most convincingly. The best part of the 
stunt driving was the fact that cameras also 
were strapped inside the stunt cars so there 
was plenty of footage "from the driver's 
point of view." 

The only thing I didn't like was the pale 
carbon of Be Happy — Go Lucky that a some- 
what inane quartet warbled at reprise of one 
commercial. If you're going to take the 
phrase "copy-writing' 'literally, why not copy 
thoroughly? 




PRODUCT: Super Suds (Colgate-Palm- 
olive-Peet) 

AGENCY: William Esty, New York 

PROGRAM: Announcements 

The soap fraternity, which knows at least 
as much about this business of advertising 
as any other group, is embroiled in a never- 
ending battle of whiteness, sudsiness, and 
ease of operation regarding the various prod- 
ucts they promote. Until Tide, and now 
Surf, there were few, I'd say, major differ- 
ences or innovations in the products them- 
selves, hence the burden on the advertising 
folks was even greater. And from this fact, 
plus the usually large expenditures (which 
help make a good theme better) came the 
finest themes and techniques, time-buys and 
programs, gimmicks and spots, in all ad- 
vertising. 

With this light doffing of my cap, 1 would 
like to question, however mildly, the Super 
Suds theme-line and their approach to this 
line: namely "Dynamite to dirt.'' Allitera- 
tive it is. short, memorable and adroitly col- 
loquial. But, as I understand it, the newer 
detergents which are bubbling over in the 
soap field are sometimes a bit harsh for all 
their advantages. It's this reason that causes 
Super Suds' non-detergent competitors to 
stress effectiveness plus kindness (white, 
wash without red, red hands). So I can"t 
exactly see why the Super Suds copy I've 
i aught not only smacks home the cxplosive- 
in'- of the product, but also gimmicks it up 
with a booming sound effect and violent vis- 
ualization. Of course this is done for punc- 
tuation and emphasis, and it's true that a 
tag line maintains (a bit weakly when asso- 
ciated with the above) that the product is 
kind to hands or finer things. Hut hen's 
what I'm wondering: isn't the over-all — no 
pun intended — impression of the copy one of 
violence? And doesn't this carry over in a 
woman's mind when she thinks of her lin- 
gerie and her hands? 



38 



SPONSOR 



WTIC Leads Attack 
on Dope Peddlers 




Paul W. Morency, WTIC Vice President and General Manager (left); 
Leonard J. Patricelli, Program Manager (right); and Allen Ludden, 
Moderator of "Mind Your Manners" program, witness the signing of 
Connecticut's new Narcotics Law by Governor John Lodge. 

■ """ .. *~ minors 



For se 
Ma 



mi nor s- 

ling narco"- ■- 



15 



to 30 years 



'for first offense. 



Copy of the new Connecticut 
law is available on request. 



Connecticut Radio Stations 

Speed Passage 
of Tough Narcotics Law 



The ability of radio to render notable public serv- 
ice was again demonstrated in Connecticut this 
month when STATION WTIC, supported by other 
broadcasters, brought about the swift enactment of 
a new State Narcotics Law designed to protect teen- 
agers from the insidious menace of dope peddlers. 
This is the first legislation of its kind specifically 
directed toward solving the growing problem of 
youth drug addiction. 

WTIC's effort, which involved a complete study 
of existing laws and specific recommendations to 
legislative bodies, was inspired by the nation-wide 
response to the anti-narcotics crusade conducted by 
the station's teen-age program "Mind Your Man- 
ners" (NBC, Saturdays, 10:00-10:30 A. M.)- 

WTIC is hopeful that what has been accomplished 
in Connecticut will be repeated in other states, and 
offers its help to all other radio stations in the coun- 
try interested in furthering this worth-while crusade. 



Connecticut radio stations that participated 
in the Anti-Narcotics Campaign 



Bridgeport WICC, WLIZ, WNAB 

Bristol WBIS 

Danbury WLAD 

Greenwich WGCH-FM 

Hartford WCCC, WDRC, W0NS, 

WTHT, WTIC 

Meriden WMMW 

Middletown WCNX 

New Britain WHAY, WKNB 

2 JULY 1951 



New Haven WAVZ, WBIB, 

WELI, WNHC 

New London WNLC 

Norwalk WNLK 

Norwich WICH 

Stamford WSTC 

Torrington WLCR, WT0R 

Waterbury...WATR, WBRY, WWC0 



WTIC 



WTIC's 50,000 Watts represented 
nationally by Weed & Co. 



39 





Hon- will this fall's nettvorh radio programing 
differ from previous years? 



Alan R. Cartoun 



Director of Advertising 
Longines-Wittnauer Watch Co., Inc. 
New York 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Cart wiin 




Mr. Barry 



Two words — cost 
and creativeness 
— are the keys to 
the difference 
that will he found 
in this fall's ra- 
dio network pro- 
graming at NBC. 
The cost will be 
low. Lower per 
program on the 
average than it 



has been for many years. This, in spite 
ol the fact that radio for many years 
has been delivering more customers 
per dollar invested than any other ad- 
vertising medium. With few excep- 
tions, the hulk of the programs planned 
for our fall lineup will cost a sponsor 
less than $5,000 per package. 

This, we at NBC feel, is a realistic. 
contemporar) approach to the prob- 
lem- currently facing the elder of the 
two broadcasting media. In view of 
the present widespread economic un- 
certainty. the heightened competition 
among broadcasters, and the advent of 
television, radio must adjust itself to 
the new situation. We feel that our 
new cost approach is doing just that. 

In the realm of creativeness. we have 
planned programs that are completely 
and uniquely radio in that the) could 
noj be presented as well or as effec- 
tively in anj other medium. 

Radio has one great advantage that 
must now be utilized to the fullest 
it appeals to and stimulates the imag- 
ination of the listener. The eye of the 
imagination i> Mill the greatest "magic 



eye ' of all time. You can, via radio, 
create the most beautiful sets, the love- 
liest women and the most dashing 
heroes — because you create them in the 
individual minds of the listeners, ac- 
cording to the standards of the indi- 
vidual listener. 

With this in mind, we are coming 
up with shows that could not be done 
even half as well visually. Our science- 
fiction program. Dimension X, is a 
prime example. The strange and un- 
usual beings of other worlds, the vast- 
ness of interstellar space, the complex- 
ity of the fabulous machines of the 
future, are far more graphic and be- 
lievable in the minds of, listeners than 
they would be in the actual sight of a 
viewer, because each listener has his 
own personally acceptable concept of 
how they would appear. 

We in radio know that we're going 
to have to share the living room from 
now on. Anyone who says we're not 
i- wrong. But anyone who thinks Mr. 
John Q. Public is going to turn the 
radio set off entirely is wholly wrong. 

Charles C. Barry 

Vice President in Charge 

oj Radio Programs 
NBC 
Vew York 



To answer this 
one, you have to 
go out on not one 
but three limbs, 
yet all, I believe, 
prett) firm and 
solid. From the 
listener s point of 
view. I think the 
answer is simple: 
it wont. There 
will be new pro- 
grams, ol course, hut on the whole, the 




Mr. Fineshriber, Jr. 



listener will derive the same satisfac- 
tion from the same multiple categories 
of news, information, entertainment 
and service that he has enjoyed since 
radio came of age. From the sponsor's 
viewpoint, I believe he will find avail- 
able the same type of outstanding ar- 
tists and proven vehicles that have con- 
sistently carried his message at the 
lowest cost-per-thousand of all adver- 
tising media — but with this difference: 
at even more attractive prices. From 
the networks' point of view, the same 
responsibility to all segments of the 
listening audience, the same over-all 
output — but again with an important 
difference, a new method of selling. I 
doubt that program content will differ 
fundamentally this fall from previous 
years, but schedules will be rearranged, 
more ingenious sales combinations will 
be devised, and programs will be tai- 
lored more closely to sales effective- 
no-. 

In some TV-happy quarters of the 
industry, it is predicted that radio pro- 
graming this fall or perhaps next year 
will be reduced to three staples: news, 
recorded music, and so-called public 
service. This view not only does vio- 
lence to the proven quality of radio's 
many-sided program offerings and 
their competitive excellence; it simi- 
larly overlooks the physical facts of 
radio's coverage compared to that of 
TV. Speaking only for Mutual, we can 
hardly see our network being sold 
short when our audience was up V , 
in 1950 over 1949. And even later con- 
firmation comes from the fact that the 
average commercial rating on MBS 
this past winter (October 1950-March 
1951 I topped the same period a year 
ago. These figures are nationwide, TV 
and non-TV areas combined, and dur- 
ing a period of TV's greatest inroads. 



40 



SPONSOR 



Here at Mutual, we recently took a 
Crossley survey of more than 500.000 
phone calls in Home-Town America, 
the smaller cities and towns represent- 
ing 25% of the U. S. population where 
television cannot hope to reach com- 
petitively for years to come. Less than 
l/10th of 1% of all listening was to 
TV. For this l/4th of the population, 
radio's service and radios opportunity 
have not lessened one iota because of 
video. Taking the country as a whole, 
radio's 96,000,000 sets still dwarf TV's 
approximately 12.000.000 no matter 
how you measure them. With this 
reach and this responsibility, network 
radio programing this fall must main- 
tain the quality and variety which its 
audience and sponsors alike demand. 

William H. Fineshriber, Jr. 

Vice President in charge of 
Programs 

M'BS 

New York 



The neat, coura- 
geous question, 
"How will this 
fall's network ra- 
dio programing 
differ from pre- 
vious years?" 
might well de- 
serve a question 
from me, which 
is "Does Macy's 
Tell Gimbel's?" 
But the price war now raging between 
the two miracles of 34th Street has 
changed all that. Macy's is telling 
Gimbel's. The naive idea that anyone 
can keep a secret in this business has 
become archaic. Furthermore, the 
changes in network radio programing 
this fall will not be limited to CBS and 
the changes are on such a broad, in- 
dustry-wide basis, that there are no 
top-level confidences. I leave my fall 
blueprint exposed on my desk for all 
the world to see. If I hid it. then may- 
be someone would think it had earth- 
shaking importance. 

Of course, the sturdy champions will 
be back. 1 refer to Messrs. Benny, 
Amos 'n' Andy, Crosby and other CBS 
rating leaders. But they're going to 
find a lot of new, fresh-faced, fresh- 
voiced companions. 

Radio is still the great advertising 
buy. Too many folks have forgotten 
that radio is still a growing boy. TV 
has given the kid a couple of bloody 
noses but he hasn't hit the canvas . . . 
(Please turn to page 57 i 




Mr. Gottlieb 



I 



The cost per listener measurement is the only 
fair and honest measurement to apply to the 
cost of radio broadcasting. This is true whether 
it be single station or network cost. When a 
cost per listener yardstick is applied to KVOO 
rates, the station's TOP VALUE is apparent. 
Check BMB figures, particularly the 6 and 7 day 
per week listening columns! You'll find convinc- 
ing proof that KVOO is "Oklahoma's Greatest 
Station . . . measured by service rendered . . . 
listeners served . . . and low cost per listener to 
the advertiser! Call, wire or write KVOO or your 
nearest Edward Petry & Company office for 
availabilities. 

Latest Tulsa Hooper shows KVOO 

again leads by substantial 

margins morning, afternoon and night. 



NBC AFFILIATE 



50,000 WATTS 1170 KC NBC AFFILIATE 

TULSA, OKLAHOMA 

National Representatives — Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



2 JULY 1951 



41 



OUT OF HOME 

LISTENING 

REPORTED BY PULSE 

The out of home radio 
audience will be re- 
ported in surveys con- 
ducted in July for the 
following Pulse mar- 
kets: 

Buffalo 

St. Louis 

Chicago 

Washington, D. C. 

Cincinnati 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

Los Angeles 

Detroit 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 

San Francisco 

Atlanta 

The reports are avail- 
able to subscribers 
and other interested 
parties. 

For information about these 
and other Pulse reports . . . 

ASK THE PULSE 

THE PULSE Incorporated 

15 West 46th Street 
New York 19, N. Y. 




This SPONSOR department -features capsuled reports of 
broadcast advertising significance culled from all seg- 
ments of the industry. Contributions are welcomed. 



K\W helps Wellington Fund reueh new? investors 



Investment companies, comprising 
a $2,000,000,000 industry which pre- 
viously confined its advertising to 
printed media, are now venturing into 
radio. Like banks and investment bro- 
kers before them ( Bache & Company; 
Merrill, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & 
Beane; Kidder Peabody & Company), 
they're selling via the airwaves. Lat- 
est advertiser is the Wellington Fund 
which totals $172,000,000 and is one 
of 106 such funds in the United States. 
Late in May. this company went into 
radio for the first time. 

A federal law explains why radio 
had been ignored previously. The Fed- 
eral Securities Act of 1933 limits the 
language used in advertising the offer- 
ing of registered securities. Companies 
who have their shares offered day to 
day through security dealers can men- 
tion only the name of the mutual fund, 
the fact that it is a mutual fund, the 
date of its organization, and the words 
"prospectus on request." 

Wellington Fund, in its current 
KYW. Philadelphia, campaign stays 
within the legal limitations but never- 
theless presents their minute-and-a-half 
commercial in provocative fashion. 

The announcement, on an early 
morning d.j. show, is never out of 
character: 

D.J. : Could I borrow a minute or so 



of 



vour valua 



ble t 



mie: 



ANNOUNCER: Well, it's not so val- 
uable. But of course. What's the mat- 
ter? 

D.J. : Well, it's not exactly a prob- 
lem, but wherever there is anything of 
intelligence or involvement concerned, 
1 like to have you standing by so that 
I don't stray too far. Well, now, let me 
tell you what the thing is. I've got a 
prospectus here that I can send out to 
young folk or to people with a few 
years on them too that sit in with us 
here in the family circle. A prospectus 
about the Wellington Fund. Do you 
know anything about that? 

ANNOUNCER: Not too much. But 
I know enough to know that a prospec- 
tus should be a very interesting thing. 

The remainder of the commercial is 
in the same vein and concludes by in- 
dicating that a prospectus can be ob- 
tained by writing the station. 

A. J. Wilkins. vice president in 
charge of national distribution of Wel- 
lington Fund shares, comments on his 
firm's air venture. "We feel that the 
inauguration of our investment plan 
for the purchase of Wellington shares 
has created thousands of potential pur- 
chasers whom we have not been reach- 
ing with our advertising and sales pro- 
motion. We wanted an advertising ve- 
hicle that would reach these people. 
We think we may have found it with 
this radio program." 



• • • 



''Career girl" gives listeners program data 



Advertisers are getting that some- 
thing "extra" on KBON. Omaha, 
through "Kay" (Miss Kay B.O.N.) 
who heralds the station's daily pro- 
grams. "Kay" makes her appearance 
every morning at 9:30 on Don Peraz- 
zo's disk show. A Date With Don. 

To point out the merits of KBON 
shows. "Kay" becomes a jack-of-all 
trades. One clay she portrays a gar- 
dener . . . "come to plant some ideas 
about easy listening." Or an archi- 



tect ..." a girl with plans . . . the 
blueprint for your information and en- 
tertainment." 

Three to four minute discussions 
with m.c. Perazzo in the lingo of her 
chosen profession, and appropriate 
sound effects, acquaint early-morning 
listeners with KBON's sponsored line- 
up. Listener comments, the station re- 
ports, show the promotion announce- 
ments to be entertaining as well as ef- 
fective program reminders. * * * 



42 



SPONSOR 



Topical radio-TV on agenda at first SCAAA meet 



Some 100 California advertising 
agency and media people met recently 
at Rancho Santa Fe, Cal., to discuss 
and exchange views on broadcast ad- 
vertising problems. The occasion : first 
annual Southern California Advertis- 
ing Agencies Association Conference. 

Among those present at the two-day 




SCAAA men relax in sun but shop talk goes on 

meet were these radio panel speakers 
(seated 1. to r. in picture above) John 
Bainbridge, program director, KFMB, 
San Diego; Wilbur Edwards, director, 
KNX, Los Angeles, and Columbia Pa- 
cific network; Robert J. McAndrews, 
panel chairman, and managing direc- 
tor, Southern California Broadcasters 
Association; Ray Gage, president, C. 
B. Juneau Inc., Beverly Hills, and pres- 
ident, Southern California Advertising 



mum 



inMiii ■ 




TV speakers share rostrum with AM experts 

Agencies Association. Standing: Sid 
Gaynor, assistant station manager and 
sales manager, KFWB, Los Angeles: 
Thomas Frandsen, sales manager, 
KMPC, Los Angeles; Leon Wrav. 
Southern California sales manager. 
Don Lee Broadcasting System; and 

2 JULY 1951 



Kevin Sweeney, sales manager, KFI 
and KFI-TV, Los Angeles. 

Television panel speakers I in lower 
photo) are Bob Laws, sales manager, 
ABC-TV, Pacific Coast division; Ray 
Gage (also on radio panel) ; Seymour 
Elate, art director, ETTV, Los Ange- 
les; Haan Tyler, panel chairman, man- 
ager, EFI-TV, Los Angeles; Richard 
Linkrum, director, CBS-TV; Charles 
Brown, director of TV Sales and Pro- 
gram Procurement, Bing Crosby En- 
terprises; McGregor Eadie, sales de- 
partment. ENBH. Hollywood; Wes 
Turner, president, Westurner Corp. 

Agenda topics went heavily into ra- 
dio's current problems with statistical 
evidence showing the large listening 
audience radio commands. Speakers 
included: Wilbur Edwards I "What's 
Different About Radio Out Here") ; 
Kevin Sweeney ("New Findings in Ra- 
dio Research" I ; Tom Frand?en I "More 
Retail Business for Agencies"). Bob 
Laws, on the TV panel spoke on "New 
Developments in TV Circulation, Im- 
pact, Advertising and Usefulness"; H. 
S. Barnes, Bureau of Advertising di- 
rector, ANPA, on "There's No Univer- 
sal Panacea for Advertising, Either." 

• • • 

Farmers' response on WOW- 
promoted tour: $72,500 

For four years now WOW, Omaha, 
has promoted a program of farm study 
tours designed to take farmers in the 
WOW area and their wives to every 
part of the nation and to Europe. But 
the latest tour promotion results excel 
anything done before. 

WOW Farm Director Mai Hansen 
announced the fourth annual tour on 
his Farm Service Reporter program, 
weekdays 6:30 to 7:00 a.m., repeating 
the announcement for six consecutive 
days. The tour: Detroit, Toronto, Mon- 
treal, Quebec (by boat), southeast 
through New England to Boston and 
New York and home via Washington, 
D. C. and Chicago. The cost, via spe- 
cial all-room train, slightly over $500. 

In six days — and in about a half- 
hour's radio time — Hansen received 
125 reservation requests accompanied 
by $50 deposit checks, with an addi- 
tional 206 inquiries. Farmers respond- 
ed to the radio-selling effort with $72.- 
500 worth of cash business and there 
was a potential additional $103,000 
from the other 206 prospects. * * * 
{Please turn to page 54) 




TV STATION 



Is keyed to a Large Daytime Audi- 
ence — Exclusively yours in 73,000 
TV homes! 

If you have a message for the 
Homemaker you'll find KOTV tele- 
vision is a mighty ECONOMICAL 
way to show her while you tell her 
through Daytime Spot Participation 
Shows. 

• Lookin at Cookin 

• Class Showcase 

• Musical jigsaw 

Three star packed, locally produced 
shows, that reach the INFLUEN- 
TIAL WOMAN'S MARKET . . . 

Programming ... of course ... in- 
cludes the pick of top entertain- 
ment from NBC, CBS, ABC, and 
DuMont. 



1 



channel 6 
first 
in 




represented by 
EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



43 



BELL TELEPHONE 

rising 
:■ I - 

- two 
zed. ana _ 

- _ its 

- - - na- 

- ■ 

. - _ - rding to the de- 

al Bell com: a 
. - 

- an es- 
nually. do little 

aip in ~_ 

- 
- 
-■-_-- 

2 

- 

like the 

- 

_ 

; share I 

-. ; -. t r. 

2- It = - - " Jt< isi- 

- 



over 18 Michigan radio stations three 
times weekly. The commercials on the 
show, according to Michigan's adver- 
anaser F. G. WallLs. cover a 
wide variety of subjects, including 
"partv line co-operation: calls to In- 
form^ _ n.inute when call- 
give the called party a 
chance to answer: the need for hang- 

_ _ properly when completir _ 
call: describing the relatively low cost 

- . the 

need for the telephone companv 

have adequate earnings: and other 

_ : od service, good manage- 

• ship which point 

Alio Make Telephone 

Serri- 

3. It uses radio announcements 
. .nection with 

■ _ - - rm damage 

and stril - and 

■ - • " rators 

4. It uses 20-= one-min- 

De- 

-. WJBK-TY. WWJ-TY. 

YZ-TV : WKZO-TV, • 

lY-TV. Grand Rapids: WJIMTV. 

- . rials sell 

- - the val- 

- . ■ -- • • torv. 



1000 WATTS 



CtaflestoB's rot fr rMchinf 



station 




Bor N::r.:.-. i:_:; lat lina's first 

: • :or over 

60 difFerent accounts Co " 

; - J- -;_:::•■ craz-; 

area. Thev all listen to "Blues 

.-.' 5::z:e" 2-5 PM Mon.- 

e Parade 4 hours on 

3 ".— : = r.~~x>ds" 

2 PM Sundays) . 

YOU reaching : 

BIG. BLUING AUDIENCE? 



Although no exact figures are avail- 
able, sponsor estimates that all 18 Bell 
companies spend a combined total of 
|2 ' 10.000 on broadcast advertising a 
year. I The companies have been grad- 
ually adopting an increased use of 
broadcast advertising. Bv and large, 
though, they have been using more of 
the printed than the air media. Some 
broadcasters contend much more radio 
and T\ broadcasting could be em- 
ployed regionally on a regular basis, 
considering the air mediums mass cov- 
erage. " The reason its difficult to 
compile a picture of the over-all broad- 
cast effort is that each company has an 
advertising manager who handles the 
regional broadcast effort independent- 
the other companies. 
The chief exception to this principle 
■ quite apart from the pooling of funds 
for The Telephone Hour* is the joint 
production of special T\ announce- 
ments. To eliminate paying excess 
for the same kind of video announce- 
ments. Will Whitmore. radio advertis- 
ing manager for the parent American 
Telephone & Telegraph Company, was 
asked by the companies to take charge 
of producing the films. At a cost of 
$15,000, Whitmore ar- 
ranged for the creation of 11 one-min- 
ute and _ - i T\ announcements 
dealing with such problems as recruit- 
ing telephone operators. The copy w as 
• the N. W. 

\ ork. and the films put 
. her by a Hollywood ex-\ T alt Dis- 
ney henchman. Paul Fennel. Preview 
prints were sent out to the 18 Bell com- 
panies: those who requested the fin- 
- I film versions split the tota 
pense of production. When using the 
announcements on their regional T\ 
station-, ea'h company paid wha - 
the local tir- ight be from its 

individual advertising budget 
duction was done by Leslie Roush. 
Inc.. New Yorl 

This has • - i '-at- 

ly that anotl r series E TV anno 
m intell;. - - 

-:ance telephone calls has also 
prodiK ed. Some 
g them. 

mmercial advei ^ht 

take a tip from the - ript- 

S and animation of these I \ 
unercials. 

bristJ - rash, •-;' • 
little Santa Glaus elf and a group of 
Me.— .land carollers [he 

a - -' -dined 
: the action is humorous and 



- 



SPONSOR 



when you 



• appoint a new rep 



• increase your power 



* change networks 



tell the 




about it in 

SPONSOR 



exe . 

■ 
PONSOR 




The use magazine of radio TV 



sprightly. While the elf leaps from 
telephone wire to wire, then plunges 
pathetically into a snow drift, the car- 
oilers harmonize to the tune of Jingle 
Bells: 

We always do our best 

For you on Christmas Day, 

But some calls don't get through — 

Or have a long delay. 

So if you want to talk 

With loved ones far away 

It's wise to place your Christmas 
calls 

Ahead of Christmas Day. 

Then the camera pans back to the 



snow drift, and out pops the elf chirp- 
ing: 

"Remember, rates are lower after 
6:00 p.m. every day and all day Sun- 
day, too." 

The strictly regional TV announce- 
ments are cleverly animated, too. For 
example, the Michigan Bell Telephone 
Company's video commercial (via N. 
W. Ayer & Son, Detroit I features a 
Mr. Classified cartoon character wear- 
ing a collegiate mortar board and 
gown. "Last Fall," says Michigan's ad- 
vertising manager F. G. Wallis, "in a 
local neighborhood Halloween parade. 




Only ONE Station DOMINATES 

This Rich, Crowing 15-COUNTY MARKET 

WITH 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE SALES OF 

$89,084,000* 

''Sales Management, 1951 Survey of Buying Power 




A%e you^fUU'^eftZ^ec £&<Zi0>t 



AM-FM 

WINSTON-SALEM 



NBC Affiliate 



HEADLET HEED CO 



one of the Detroit youngsters dressed 
up like this character, complete to the 
printed inscription on the front of his 
costume." 

Radio announcements used by the 
associate companies generally fall into 
two distinct groupings — recorded and 
live messages. Perhaps typical is the 
radio operation of the Bell Telephone 
Company of Pennsylvania. This year, 
the Pennsylvania company will spend 
$140,000 to $150,000 for a continuous 
announcement schedule - - three-per- 
week on 59 of the larger Pennsylvania 
stations, two a week on 33 smaller ones, 
and varying numbers over five sta- 
tions in Delaware. 

The company prefers recorded com- 
mercials whenever possible (written 
by William S. Harvey, copy chief at 
the Gray & Rogers Agency, and placed 
by timebuyer Walter M. Erickson). 
Each station on the schedule receives a 
new transcription every three months, 
on which are cut 20 separate one-min- 
ute spots. The messages are played re- 
peatedly — one through 20 — until new 
transcriptions arrive from the ad 
agency. 

"The spots are scattered pretty much 
around the clock," says timebuyer 
Erickson. "But there's a heavy concen- 
tration during the early evening hours, 
in order to reach all members of the 
family at one time. In Philadelphia, 
which has 11 stations, there's scarcely 
an hour throughout the day and early 
evening when a Bell message is not 
heard. Over nine years of the Bell spot 
radio program, we've captured many 
valuable key times between important 
adjacencies." 

The company's predilection for re- 
corded announcements is explained this 
way by agency radio/TV chief Ed- 
mund H. Rogers: "When a broadcast 
is live, each announcer interprets the 
message in his own way. We don't 
want that. Our material is not contro- 
versial, and shouldn't be in tone. 
There's no reason for excitement. We 
don't want it pounded across. It's just 
to be spoken conversationally, in a 
good-natured, man-to-man manner. We 
record it that way, and that's the way 
it's heard." 

The performer who presents the ami- 
able, man-to-man spiel is Peter Rob- 
erts, an NBC announcer, who speaks 
on such regionally germane topics as 
the advisability of using the telephone 
directory instead of calling Informa- 
tion, and the courteous use of the par- 
ty-line facilities. His dulcet, "This is 



46 



SPONSOR 



Peter Roberts speaking for the Bell 
Telephone Company" - which opens 
every recorded announcement - - has 
made such an impression on Penn- 
sylvanians that many have even writ- 
ten to him asking him for technical ad- 
vice on phone service. 

"1 have the feeling,'" says Rogers, 
"that some people must think Roberts 
is Alexander Graham Bell, or even Don 
Ameche." 

The company also uses live radio an- 
nouncements; but these, according to 
Franklin P. Jones, the agency's briskly 
competent publicity director, deal only 
"with a strictly local situation.*' These 
one-minute announcements or 20-sec- 
ond station breaks announce that direc- 
tories are being distributed in a certain 
city, or that service in another town is 
being switched over from the manual 
to dial system. 

A typical message in the latter cate- 
gory, broadcast from WNAR, Norris- 
town, Pa., began: "Your Bell Tele- 
phone Company wants us to remind 
you that wide-range dial telephone ser- 
vice in Norristown begins at seven 
o'clock tomorrow. From Norristown 
telephones, you'll dial direct to all oth- 
er Norristown and Valley Forge tele- 
phones. . . ." 

A unique variation on the delivery 
of radio announcements has been 
adopted by the New York Telephone 
Company, which spends between $350.- 
000 and' $400,000 on its broadcast ad- 
vertising effort annually. Its ad agen- 
cy (Batten, Barton. Durstine & Osborn, 
New York) fuses both live and record- 
ed messages in the announcements the 
company directs to 98 radio stations 
throughout the state. 

For example, a one-minute announce- 
ment will begin with a 15-second tran- 
scription, prepared by BBDO vice pres- 
ident Bob Foreman, aided by radio 
copy writer Anne Thomas. It goes this 
way: 

SOUND: Telephone rings once. 

WOMAN: Hello, this is Meribeth 
Watzon speaking for the New York 
Telephone Company. As vou know, 
the number of telephones here has 
grown by leaps and bounds during the 
past few years. Have you ever thought 
of what this means to you? Well, here's 
someone to tell you about it. 

( This is follotved by live tag by lo- 
cal announcer with copy to be supplied 
by the telephone manager.) 

What this final, bracketed injunction 
means is that the last 45 seconds of 
the announcement will be spoken live 




i 1 I / i / / / K 
~ r-r / / ft// , 

> > ' I 




/tff5> 



-> 









» ' ,K ^%\Tf}Mhiii, 

1 WK 



nntlllt'"" 1 '" 




* 'iff' 1 ' ' 

i*r"""Mii/%^/„ 



**&**»&. 



/7sk me 
mm wm knows 

Are you on full pressure in the Atlanta Market? 
In Atlanta when you buy WCST you reach the 
whole market, just ask the man who knows 
— Mr. Atlanta — he says buy WCST. Top ABC 
shows, high local acceptance and alert merchandising 
mean an effective selling job for you. That's why 
more local advertisers buy more time on WCST than 
any other Atlanta station. 




2 JULY 1951 



47 




WILLIAM CHALMERS 

V. P. & Radio-TV Dir. 

Grey Advertising Agency, Inc. 



LIKE MOST 
"Newsworthy" 
TV & RADIO 
EXECUTIVES 
Mr. Chalmers' 
LATEST 
PUBLICITY 
PORTRAIT 
IS BY- 

Photographer to the Business Executive 
565 Fifth Ave., New York 17— PL 3-1882 



by the announcer of the radio station 
that has been selected by BBDO's time- 
buyer Mary Ellis. The live copy is sup- 
plied by BBDO's account executives 
Don Velsey and Ed Ney to the man- 
ager of the local telephone company, 
who is familiar with the local situation. 
The agency men leave open certain 
blanks in their live copy ("Squeedunk, 
N. Y. has added . . . new telephones 
this past year" I ; and the manager fills 
in with his intimate knowledge. Then 
the company manager forwards the fin- 
ished copy to the station announcer. 

"The virtue of this technique," says 
Edward L. Monser, advertising man- 
ager for the New York company, "is 
that each local Bell manager through- 
out the state becomes, in effect, a lo- 
cal advertising manager. He's at the 
grass roots of the local situation, and 
can offer his specialized knowledge. 
Besides, it encourages him to take a 
more zealous interest in the New York 
company's radio program." 

Account executive Velsey adds: "It 
took some time to get the system work- 
ing. But now, after two and one-half 
years of radio broadcasting, the tech- 
nique is coming along fine. We've got- 
ten amazingly good results with the 
announcements. Last summer, the com- 
pany surveyed people at upstate coun- 
ty fairs, and 143 out of 345 replied 
'yes' to the question, "Have you ever 
heard Meribeth Watzon on the ra- 
dio?'" 

When it comes to regional radio pro- 
graming, one of the outstanding jobs 
is done by the Ohio Bell Telephone 
Company. The company (via McCann- 
Erickson, Inc., Cleveland) spends 
s:')()(U)00 ;i vcai mi broadcasting, in- 
cluding its share in The Telephone 
Hour; five-times-a-week participation 
programing on WEWS, Cleveland; ra- 
dio announcements throughout the 
Buckeye State; and TV announcements 
in Columbus, Cleveland, Dayton, and 
Toledo. Its most notable effort, though, 
is the venerable, three-times-a-week ra- 
dio show, The Ohio Story, which has 
been on the air since January. 1947. 
(See "They like Mr. Bell— in Ohio," 
sponsor, 1 November 1947.) As of 
now, the show blankets the state over 
these 13 stations: 

Canton, WHBC; Cleveland, WTAM; 
Columbus, WBNS; Coshocton, WTNS; 
Dayton, WHIO; Marietta. WMOA: 
Sandusky, WI.I.C: Springfield, WIZE: 
Steubenville, WSTV; Toledo, WSPD; 
Worthington. WRFD; Youngstown. 
WKBN; and Zanesville, WHIZ. 



The program's basic idea is simple 
— to tell the story of the state, its past 
and present, to all who live in Ohio. 
As a consequence, the show does for 
the Ohio utility on a regional scale 
what The Telephone Hour does for the 
Bell System on a national scale. It 
makes subscribers feel that the Ohio 
utility is part and parcel of daily Ohio 
living. Because the program deals so 
warmly and vividly with such histori- 
cal Ohioans as Annie Oakley, local 
schools often ask to play the shows 
back over their loud speaker systems. 
WBOE, the Board of Education sta- 
tion of Cleveland, uses selected Ohio 
Story programs for in-school training; 
and churches and fraternal orders fre- 
quently ask for special disks of Ohio 
sagas that are close to their heart. 

The show gets heavy promotion 
from those corporations whose Ohio 
roots it dramatizes. When it saluted 
the greeting card industry, hundreds 
of post cards went out to stationery 
stores telling of the broadcast. 

When a program was conceived 
around Jack Werst, the Dayton pur- 
chaser of the Vanderbilt diamond, 
every jeweler around Dayton received 
a circular from WHIO. In addition, 
ad manager Anson F. Hardman ar- 
ranges for big newspaper advertise- 
ments to tell local areas of shows that 
are of special interest to them. 

L. L. Evert, assistant vice president 
of the Ohio Bell, credits ad manager 
Hardman, account executive Robert 
Dailey, commercial writer Don Lind- 
say and script writer Frank Siedel for 
the "high quality" of the show. He 
points out that the program has won 
scads of awards, ranging from the Na- 
tional Advertising gold medal of 1948 
to the Cleveland Advertising Club 
plaque of 1949 for advertising achieve- 
ment. 

"The Ohio Story has been voted 
each year in the various newspaper 
polls as the best program originating 
in Ohio," Evert told SPONSOR, adding 
proudly, "These also have voted the 
commercials the most effective and 
least objectionable." 

His comment points up keenly the 
important lesson that commercial ad- 
vertisers could learn from the broad- 
casting efforts of the 18 Bell Telephone 
Companies: when you want to sell a 
product, yet gain good will from the 
public, a soft word is often a better 
way of capturing the listener than sand- 



bagging him. 



• • • 



48 



SPONSOR 



MEN, MONEY, MOTIVES 

[Continued from page 6) 

Now new sponsor moves in, he's new 
sponsor of old show. Old show flopped 
for old sponsor. Old sponsor has de- 
parted, his tail on fire. New sponsor 
doesn't know about old sponsor. New 
sponsor doesn't read trade papers, cor- 
rection, doesn't read. Package pro- 
ducer and agency producer are like 
this: XX. To XX, add 25' < for mis- 
cellaneous. 

Both men belong to the same troop, 
Boy Scouts. Both drank milk, same 
cow, Borscht Circuit, Catskills, 1935. 
New sponsor thinks package producer 
is a theatrical genius. The agency pro- 
ducer told him so. He isn't a theatrical 
genius, he's a financial genius. New 
sponsor doesn't know the difference. 
Old sponsor, in ointment and band- 
ages, can't be interviewed. That's the 
script being re-written on network sta- 
tionery, add 25% for overhead. 

The script editor has ants in her 
brassiere, at the last minute they throw 
away this week's show and use next 
week's show instead, adding 25% of 
next week's overhead to this week's 
overhead. 

The package producer is in the cli- 
ent's booth telling the sponsor about 
the champagne party he's arranged for 
after the telecast. 

He's sparing no expense, since he 
makes a profit on his expenses. * * * 



MORNING MEN 

{Continued from page 23) 

program just about has everything the 
early morning listener seeks to give 
him a good start for the day." 

Some sections of the country require 
a local touch in their morning man. 
A Memphis station suggests "a sincere 
hillbilly," while a North Carolina sta- 
tion mentions a "typical Southern ac- 
cent." Several stations feel their man 
should be active in local affairs and 
causes; one prefers a person who will 
make good impressions during public 
appearances. 

A distinctive personality in the "get 
'em up with a smile" school usually 
develops his own twists, props, and 
gimmicks to give his program a unique 
flavor. Sam Beard, for example. 
WPTF. Raleigh, N. C, morning man 
who follows Joe Reaves at 8:30 a.m. 
daily, adds variety to his stint by occa- 
sional remote broadcasts. WPTF's 
promotion manager. R. W. Young- 



tried 

tested 

proved 



23 years of service and smart programming have made and 
kept WMMN in number 1 position in the rich north-cen- 
tral West Virginia area. 

WMMN is the only station programmed and powered to 
serve both day and night the 18 counties that comprise a healthy 
portion of the state of West Virginia. 



a power 
packed 

producer 
of sales 




WiSW! 



5000 watts Represented by KATZ 



CBS 



A FORT INDUSTRY STATION 

Mailing Address, Fairmont, W. Va. 



2 JULY 1951 



49 



steadt, says: "Sam may pick a street 
corner, a safety island, or a restaurant 
from which to stage his talks with lo- 
cal folks in the news. Just a different 
way of presenting local events — push- 
ing safety or any special local cam- 
paign. Sam is a past master at tying 
commercials into his program so they 
seem a real part of it." 

One of the most unusual props used 
by a morning man is the flock of sing- 
ing canaries who join in on the Art 
Brown Shoiv every morning. Brown, 
morning man on WWDC, Washington, 
D. C, accompanies the birds on either 
a Hammond organ, a piano, or a ce- 
leste. Risking censure, his canary 
"Baby" flutters around in her bath be- 
fore the microphone. 

A veteran of 16 years on morning 
programs, Art Brown found the 
WWDC studio swamped by listeners 
wishing him a "Happy Birthday" last 
December 24th. More recently he em- 
ceed a School Safety Patrol Show in 
Washington's National Guard Armory. 
The American Automobile Association 
chose Brown for the job as a result of 
his daily 8:00 a.m. broadcasts to some 
3,500 School Safety Patrolmen in the 
capital city. He's also been master of 



ceremonies at Kiwanis, Lions, Board 
of Trade, and other meetings. 

Another morning man, Don Bell of 
KRNT, Des Moines, has an anniversary 
celebration each year to which he in- 
vites listeners. Almost 6,000 turned 
out before 6:00 a.m. for his fourth- 
year anniversary party held a few 
months back. They jammed the huge 
KRNT Theater, watched and partici- 



"Good advertising is the kind which is 
so enticing and clear that it will make 
a woman unhappy with the clothes she 
has just bought." 

H. WOODRUFF BISSELL 

Vice president. 

Geyer, Newell & Ganger, TV.Y. 



pated in a fun-packed three-hour party 
broadcast — downed 6,000 doughnuts 
and 180 gallons of hot coffee in the 
process. 

In a special promotion stunt for Col- 
gate-Palmolive-Peet's washing powder, 
FAB, m.c. Lyndon Grove of station 
CHAB, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 
hiked down to a laundry for a remote 
broadcast. While sudsing his wash in 
the laundry's window, he interviewed 
ladies engaged in the same chore, per- 



CLEVEUND'S (/ty STATION • WJW •CLEVElANO'S^^fow^' SIGNAL- wjw -CLEVELAND'S^ ST^. 

Chief 



Says: 





W00S0ME TWOSOME 

"Double threat to housewive's heart . . . 
Jockies Hines and Clifton,- 
With her money she will part, 
For products they have pitched on." 

The gals laugh with Hines . . . sigh with Clifton . . . 
and BUY! Let Cleveland's top personalities sell for YOU. 



■1 
g 

m 



CLEVELAND'S 



STATION 



5000 W. 

WJW BUILDING 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 




m 



BY 



BASIC ABC 

CLEVELAND IS, OHIO 
H-R REPRESENTATIVES, 



Inc. 



suaded one to help him finish wash- 
ing his dirty clothes. During the 15- 
minute remote broadcast, Grove had 
no trouble getting in some authentic 
plugs for FAB. 

Ed Meath, m.c. of Musical Clock on 
station WHEC, Rochester, has devised 
regular features which build loyally 
and interest. LeMoine C. Wheeler, 
commercial manager of WHEC, de- 
scribes them: "Our man devotes five 
minutes daily during the school year 
to a special tune for the kids, and some 
homely admonitions to them to see that 
their hair is combed, teeth brushed, 
fingernails clean, etc., and then sends 
them off to school. Also, he has a daily 
stunt of saluting a shut-in whose name 
is sent in by the audience. The shut- 
ins get a floral gift from a local florist, 
and are invariably swamped for the 
next week or two by greeting cards 
from listeners. We've found stunts like 
these very, very effective." 

The Musical Clock, emceed by Ed 
Brown over WJJJ. Montgomery, Ala., 
makes a weekly remote broadcast from 
Leon's Restaurant each Wednesday. 
Explains station manager John C. 
Hughes: "Everyone is served coffee 
and doughnuts and there are favors 
and prizes for each participant. Each 
show is built around a special theme 
— this week it was Dairy Month. Prizes 
were listed on cards attached to minia- 
ture cows (five and ten cent store va- 
riety) ." 

Station WFBL, Syracuse, N. Y., 
makes a big production of their Musi- 
cal Clock Highlights. Besides the m.c, 
there are one or two soloists and a five- 
to-eight-piece live orchestra. Robert 
G. Soule, WFBL vice president, re- 
ports: "We make a great play for a 
studio audience, especially Saturday 
mornings when we always have a full 
house. The show becomes a real par- 
ty, with advertisers' products being 
served as refreshments and otherwise 
demonstrated." 

One morning man has been doing 
remote broadcasts everyday for over a 
month, but not by choice. He's Ed 
Slusarczyk of WIBX, Utica, who is al- 
so its Farm Director. An auto acci- 
dent on the way to the studio one 
morning put him in the hospital. His 
broadcasts continue, however, from 
home where he's convalescing. 

The foregoing are just some of the 
variations introduced by morning men 
to add bits of their own personality to 
the routine service nature of musical 
clock shows. A fairly recent innova- 



50 



SPONSOR 



tion, but one which appears to be ex- 
panding rapidly, is the teaming up of 
husbands and wives and of pairs of 
morning men. 

One outstanding early-morning duo 
is the husband and wife team of busy 
Tex and Jinx McCrary. Jinx is the for- 
mer movie actress and model, Jinx 
Falkenberg; Tex was a former editori- 
al writer on the New York Daily Mir- 
ror. Their daily morning show on 
WNBC, New York, features interviews 
with well known celebrities — baseball 
players, authors, politicians, actresses, 
etc. It differs from competing pro- 
grams in its news feature approach, an 
angle probably accounted for by Tex 
McCrary 's newspaper background. 

On at about the same time are Dor- 
othy (Kilgallen) and Dick (Kollmar), 
a husband and wife team heard over 
WOR, New York. WJZ counters with 
Ed and Pegeen Fitzgerald, another 
married pair. 

Representative of the growing trend 
toward pairs of morning men is the 
comic combination of Rayburn & 
Finch, heard over WNEW, New York, 
for the past four years and due for a 
CBS network show this Fall. Zany and 
completely unpredictable, they've built 
a loyal audience largely through stud- 
ied irreverence for commercial tran- 
scriptions. When they're not taking an 
imaginary, and highly improbable, 
trip through a sponsor's factory, 
chances are they're cueing a humorous 
interpolation into the middle of a very 
serious transcribed sales pitch. 

Explaining their reasons for over- 
riding a fairly general rule against a 
comic treament on musical clock pro- 
grams, the two explained: "When you 
pack commercials so close together in 
a short period of time, they get dead- 
ly. We dress them up by kidding them 
a little, adding something extra that 
listeners get to look for. One woman 
we know turns the radio down during 
the musical parts, turns it up only 
when the commercials come on. Of 
course this kind of treatment requires 
good taste — which we have." 

Kidding the commercial is only one 
way of adding the important personal 
touch to selling which all stations agree 
is vital for musical clock shows. The 
Rayburn & Finch approach to tran- 
scribed commercials is unusual, how- 
ever, and most of the broadcasters 
quizzed suggested the personal, ad lib 
type of pitch done by the morning 
man himself. 

The words "sincere" and "informal" 




WTAR Sells ALL 

The Norfolk Metropolitan 
Sales Area for You! 

WTAR is the profitable way to sell the big, eager 
and able-to-buy Norfolk Metropolitan Sales Area — 
Norfolk, Portsmouth, Newport News, Virginia. 
According to BMB, 95% of the families in this four- 
county sales area listen to WTAR regularly. Hooper says 
that most Norfolks listen most of the time to WTAR. Add 
the fact that WTAR delivers more listeners-per-dollar 
than any other local station or combination of stations. 
Easy to see why WTAR reduces sales costs, increases 
sales and profits. 

MARKET DATA -Norfolk Metropolitan Sales Area 





population 
IR^Jestimates 

V -" i ^ 1/1/51 


RETAIL SALES- 1950 
W/^ ESTIMATES 


EFFECTIVE BUYING INCOME 

flZH ,950 

*-*"^ ESTIMATES 




Total 

(in 
Thou- 
sands) 


Families 
(in 
Thou- 
sands) 


Dollars 

(in 
Thou- 
sands) 


% 

of 

U.S.A. 


Net 

Dollars 

(in 

Thousands) 


Per 
Capita 


Per 

Family 


Norfolk -Portsmouth 
Metropolitan Area . 

Newport News 

Metropolitan Area . 


419.4 

144. 5 


107.2 
38.9 


$375,623 
113,954 


.2677 
.0812 


$509,403 
182,051 


$1,215 
1,260 


$4,752 
4,680 


TOTAL 

Norfolk Metropolitan 


563.9 


146.1 


489,577 


.3489 


691,454 


1,226 


4,7 3 3 




NBC Affiliate 

5,000 Watts Day and Night 



Inter-connected NBC, CBS, ABC, 
& DuMont Television Networks 



Nationally Represented by EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



2 JULY 1951 



51 




,7.'i' teJ 



^ 






Same old story 
in Rochester . . 



V$ A? 



WHEC WAY 
OUT AHEAD! 

Consistent Hooper Leader since 
1 943. Leads morning, afternoon 
and night! .... 



WHEC 



ROCHESTER, N.YJ 
5,000 WATTS \ 

Representative* ... 
EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc., New York, Chicago 
LEE F. O'CONNELL CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



SEPARATE BUT EQUAL 

WERD 

Proves A Moot Southern Point in Atlanta 

. . . "Separate but equal", — that famous phrase 
heard but seldom seen, came true, Hooper-wise 
for WERD in May, 8:00 AM to 12 noon- 
Monday through Friday. 

WERD's Hooper Audience share equals tiie best 
station in Atlanta today. Here are the Hoopered 



WERD 

Station A 

Station B 

Station C 

Other AM anil FM 
WERD is the most economical radio buy in l 
860 on every Atlanta dial covers the area sin 
i ... i , ... ...-.,, - 



— 23.2 

— 23.2 

— 19.7 

— 10.6 

— 23.2 




came up most frequently in connection 
with commercial delivery. As Morris 
A. Kenig of WRNL, Richmond, puts 
it: '"The method varies with the prod- 
uct, but as a rule the informal, or off- 
the-cuff approach works very well. Try 
to avoid high-pressure overselling." 
Where the morning man has built a 
loyal following, his personal endorse- 
ment is a powerful assist. 

The bait that draws the majority of 
listeners to their radio between "get 
up" and "go to work" time is the suc- 
cession of informative tidbits provided. 
Time — will we have Wheaties this 
morning, or can we spare time to cook 
up some Wheatena? Weather — rub- 
bers and umbrella today, or a liglit 
summer suit? And news — what's hap- 
pened during the night and early this 
morning that I ought to know about? 
Here's how the average station handles 
these three "magnets." 

Time is broadcast from "as fre- 
quently as possible" (KSFO, San Fran- 
cisco's policy) to once every 15 min- 
utes. The 15-minute interval between 
time announcements is uncommon, 
however; most morning shows call out 
the time about once every three to five 
minutes. 

Weather reports vary considerably 
in frequency. Some stations make it a 
point to give at least a brief report 
every 15 minutes, others include it with 
an hourly news summary. Smart 
scheduling of weather forecasts is 
shown by station WCHS, Charleston, 
whose promotion director, Harry M. 
Brawley, says: "Weather reports should 
be given frequently, especially at the 
usual arising times, such as a few min- 
utes after 6:30, 7:00, etc. People have 
a habit of setting alarm clocks for even 
periods such as 6:30, so time should 
be allowed for them to turn their ra- 
dios on — which they will do if they 
know they will get a weather report 
and news right away." 

News summaries are frequently a 
regular feature, put out by stations 
hourly or half-hourly throughout the 
broadcast day, regardless of program. 
The morning man mav also give brief 
"headlines" as well, but the newsroom 
usually carries the burden of five or 
15-minute newscasts. WPAT, Pater- 
son, which points out that it has the 
heaviest news service in the metropoli- 
tan New York area, carries local news 
every hour on the hour, world-wide 
news every hour on the half-hour — a 
total of 38 newscasts each day. 

Music, the mortar that holds these 



service features together, depends on 
the sensibilities of freshly-awakened 
listeners and local preference. Marion 
Annenberg, promotion manager of 
WDSU, New Orleans, echoes the opin- 
ion of most stations: "We've found that 
listeners prefer popular and light tunes. 
Music that does not jar them but also 
is full of enough life to keep 'em mov- 
ing and get them off to work in a good 
mood." Ralph O'Connor, general man- 
ager of WISC, Madison, calls it "whis- 
tle music" — tunes the listener can whis- 
tle or hum to himself. 

Some of the regional variations re- 
ported : 

• WSBT. South Bend—". . . pri- 
marily straight pops, plus occasional 
novelty, occasional western, and cur- 
rent favorites from Dixieland jazz." 

• WDIA, Memphis — ". . . standard 
race and popular records, sprinkled 
with a few cheery novelty numbers."' 

• CFQC, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan 
-"Bright, but not jazzy. Marches, 

polkas, westerns and hillbillys. Also, 
cheerful pop tunes." 

• ••••••• 

"Politics is just like selling soap, no 
difference at all. You have to have a 
good ad. Get your name hefore the peo- 
ple, so they'll remember it when they 
go to the polls." 

EDWARD J. KELLY 
Ex-Mayor. Chicago 

• ••••*** 

• WSJS, Winston Salem— "Most 
satisfactory music is the string band, 
gospel groups, and certain types of 
popular. ' 

• WBT, Charlotte - "Instrumental 
selections which have a little bounce 
can be used with effect between vocal 
selections. It's not a good idea to make 
dreamy ballads standard fare." 

Several stations point out the value 
of music library selections for musical 
clock programs. Donald W. Richard- 
son, production supervisor for WJEF, 
Grand Rapids, says: "Bright music: 
novelties, up-tempo ballads, but no 
jive, jam. etc. Transcription libraries 
offer much that is good in the way of 
morning 'wake-up' music." 

National sales manager of KMPC, 
Los Angeles, Charles H. Cowling am- 
plifies this by explaining: "The music 
best for this show, here at least, is the 
middle-of-the-road, popular type mu- 
sic. Our Ross Mulholland uses Lang- 
worth and Standard Libraries to great 
success. One reason is that they have 
shorter tunes in the libraries, which al- 
lows us to get in more commercials 
than we could with standard records." 



52 



SPONSOR 



2. 
3. 

4. 



A cursory glance at the average mu- 
sical clock program might lead the un- 
wary to assume there's nothing to 
them. Just some time signals, weather 
reports, news summaries, records, and 
some chatter linking them all together. 
sponsor's survey indicates it's not as 
simple as that. Here are some of the 
most common pitfalls a musical clock 
program is apt to stumble into. 

Bob Covington, promotion manager 
of WBT, Charlotte, gives a comprehen- 
sive list of them: 
1. Poor taste. 

Forced humor. 

Over-lengthy chatter at the cost 
of musical content. 
"Rutty" presentation — same ap- 
proaches, same phraseology, 
same gimmicks, day after day. 
5. Not continually conscious of lo- 
cal social and charity events that 
should be publicized and pro- 
moted. 
Other pitfalls mentioned were: 
". . . over-commercialization," cited 
by WMT, Cedar Rapids; "repetition 
of music" by WGAR. Cleveland: "slop- 
py production" by WDIA, Memphis. 

A morning man quickly learns to 
sidestep these pitfalls or he doesn't last. 
And the record of survival has been 
excellent to date — some morning men 
have become veterans of 15, even 25 
years on the same stations. Their sales 
records, made during early-morning 
"fringe" time periods, at low cost to 
advertisers, emphasize the fact that ra- 
dio is still the number-one low-cost 
medium. More than one product has 
pushed its way up from a small begin- 
ning to a hearty maturity on the coat- 
tails of a genial morning man. * * * 



TV COMMERCIALS 

{Continued from page 38) 

voice merely describing what you are 
seeing, which is a bit unnecessary. If 
they get too far out of synchroniza- 
tion, the sound and sight are at odds 
which only serves to confuse the view- 
er. 

And most disconcerting: all the 
while you are viewing a voice-over 
commercial, you secretly wonder who 
the devil is doing the talking, where 
he is, and why you can't see him. Con- 
trast an unseen announcer describing 
a refrigerator while some dame 
wreathed in a vapid smile points out 
the various features — with attractive 
Betty Furness, all by her lonesome, 

2 JULY 1951 




at 50/000 watts 
gives advertisers the 



GREATEST 
COVERAGE 



at the 



LOWEST 
RATE 

of any Major Station in the 



DETROIT 
AREA 



This powerful radio voice is hitting a 1*7,000,000 population area in 
5 important states and is open to advertisers at the lowest rate of 
any major station in this region. A tremendous buy for action and 
sales that is establishing new records daily. Get the facts now. 




50,000 WATTS at 800 KC. 

Guardian Bldg. • Detroit, Mich. 

Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. jl. /. E. Campeau 

National Rep. President 

MUTUAL 



53 




You Can Cover 
Central New York 
with ONE 



"Radio Station = 

. . . and Summer Sales are 
always good in this popular 
resort area 

• 

Woiictorful 

Availabilities! 

Write, Wire, Phone or 
Ask Headley-Reed 

w<:vpacuse 

WWO^fif/ 570 kc 

NBC AFFILIATE • WSYR-AM-FM-TV 

The Only Complete Broadcast 
Institution in Central New York 



talking and demonstrating a Westing- 
house. There you have the big differ- 
ence. 

There are times, though, when voice- 
over can be used to advantage. For 
example, when you want a "March of 
Time" narrative effect in your copy. 
Or an explanation of what the scene 
is or how the dish is being made. But 
it never is a satisfactory substitute for 
direct selling. If you must cut the cost 
of sound-shooting an entire film to 
meet your budget and also reduce the 
burden imposed upon your announcer, 
merely use him on camera for a lead- 
in and lead-out, permitting him to car- 
ry the middle portion of the copy 
voice-over. This, at least, will enable 
your viewers to meet your spokesman 
and to continue visualizing him while 
his voice alone is carrying the body 
of your message. 

P.S. Anyone — film producer, agen- 
cy, or otherwise — who would like cur- 
rent TV copy reviewed by the under- 
ground, see that I get a 16mm print 
and we'll try to get around to it with 
dispatch. 



* • • 



ROUNDUP 

{Continued from page 43) 

Briefly . . . 

WTAG, Worcester, Mass., is winning 
friends with their new "hospitality" 
venture. WTAG has mailed out hand- 
some courtesy cards to people in the 
radio advertising field entitling recipi- 
ents to three meals and overnight lodg- 
ing for themselves and a guest at any 
of the four top-flight hostelries in the 
WTAG coverage area. In Miami. 
WTVJ provides for a special half rate 
for their friends at Miami Beach's Con- 
tinental Hotel. 

*- * * 

New officers elected at a recent meet- 
ing of the Pennsylvania Association of 
Broadcasters are Sam Booth (WCHA, 
Chambersburg, general manager), who 
became president; Roger Clipp (WFIL, 
WFIL-TV, Philadelphia, general man- 
ager I. vice president; and David Ben- 
nett (WKBO, Ilarrisburg, general man- 

ager), secretary. 

* * * 

The listening and viewing publics 
increased interest in government ac- 
tivities, spurred by the Kefauver pro- 
ceedings, has resulted in a new pro- 
graming trend, the increased airing of 
Legislative proceedings. Latest is the 
tape recorded sessions of the Colorado 




Legislative sessions win audiences-advertisers 

Springs City Council on KVOR, Colo- 
rado Springs. Local sponsor is a roof- 
ing, plumbing and construction con- 
tractor who limits his commercials to 
a short opening and closing consisting 
of institutional copy. 

* * * 

WNAX, Yankton, S. D., keeps their 
addressees conscious of the WNAX 
sales market. Appearing on the WNAX 
letterhead are sales points like this one: 
Today— 1, May. 1951 Retail Sales in 
the WNAX Market were $11,276,088. 

* * * 

Lou R. Maxon, president of Maxon, 
Inc., was awarded a silver plaque by 
Edward Cardinal Mooney, leading 
Catholic prelate. The occasion: Max- 




Prelate honors agency head for charity efforts 

on's leadership in a drive to equip the 
new Bon Secours Hospital in Grosse 
Pointe. Mich. Maxon's committee 
raised .$170,000, exceeding the drive's 
goal by $50,000. 

■::• •::• * 

The Souths newest television and 
radio sales and service organization, 
STARS. Inc.. has been formed with 
offices in Atlanta, Jacksonville, and 
Nashville. The announcement, made 
by E. D. Rivers. Jr.. president of 
WEAS, Atlanta, says the station repre- 
sentative firm began formal operation 
on 1 July and represents an initial 
group of over 15 stations. Heading up 
STARS, Inc. i~ Winston S. Dustin, 
formerly sales v.p.. WNOE, New Or- 
leans, and KNOE, Monroe, La. 



54 



SPONSOR 



HOWSCHWERIN DOES IT 

I Continued from page 29 i 

NBC, Campbell Soup. Colgate-Palm- 
olive-Peet, General Mills. Miles Labor- 
atories, Quaker Oats, and the Toni 
Company. In its five years of opera- 
tion, the Schwerin company has serv- 
iced over 40 clients, used more than 
500,000 people in its test panels. 

Just how does Schwerin do it? 

Take the test panel pictured on these 
pages as an example of the Schwerin 
technique in action. By 7:15 p.m. on 
the evening pictured an orderly line of 
picked respondents snaked back a half- 
block from the Avon Theatre in New 
York, admission tickets clutched in 
their hands. To get the tickets, they 
had answered a preliminary question- 
naire enclosed with their invitation to 
attend. The tickets for this particular 
evening's test were sent only to those 
whose questionnaires indicated they 
would help make up part of the kind 
of audience Schwerin wanted to test. 
That is, they were hand picked for the 
purpose — to test the TV show Live 
Like a Millionaire. 

A few minutes after 7:15 p.m., ush- 
ers fastened back the lobby doors and 
several hundred people filed through; 
each of them was handed a pad of test 
forms and pencil. By 7:30 — starting 
time — practically all of the 435 seats 
were filled. 

As the audience settled back in their 
seats expectantly, the m.c, a former 
actor, stepped up on the platform. He 
told them why they were there, what 
they would do, and how to do it. His 
orientation talk, livened by a few quips 
and some cartoon-style colored slides, 
relieved the tension, got things under- 
way. 

The m.c. first asked them to fill in a 
general questionnaire covering age, 
sex, education, children in the home, 
job. an indication of income bracket, 
amount of time spent with radio and 
TV, whether a TV set was owned. This 
information would later be matched 
up with the program's response "pro- 
file" (graph) to discover the reasons 
for radical dips and rises in the "lik- 
ing" curve. 

A second questionnaire covered pro- 
gram and product information. How 
often did the respondent listen to these 
programs? What brands of soap, sham- 
poo, tooth paste, etc., does he buy? 
What does he (or she) think about 
X Company, Y Company — as many as 
five companies altogether. (This ques- 









6 



NOW IN 

TH YEAR 

IN MINNEAPOLIS, consist- 
ently outraging important 
network shows on all 
stations 



5 



TH YEAR 

IN NEW ORLEANS, con- 
sistently delivering a large 
and loyal audience, prov- 
ing radio's greatest point- 
per-dollar buy 



He'll get results for you, too! 

Results that will pay off in 
renewal after renewal for 
you . . . high ratings and 
increased sales for your 
sponsors. 

For details, write, wire 



or phone af once to 



4 



TH YEAR 

IN RALEIGH, consistently 
selling for Carolina Power 
and Light Company. 





"torn*/ 

Jacksonville, Fla.'s 

BIG Hillbilly 

audience 

^aw'ie aUwiny at 

WOBS 

The Station They All Listen To 



ask 

John limit & Co. 

about the 

II ura & Martin 

STATIONS 

IN 

RICHMOND 

HOD™ 
WTV R-tv 

First Stations in Virginia 



tion sheet is filled out before the audi- 
ence knows what program or sponsor 
they will rate.) Enough programs, 
products, and companies are listed to 
"mask" the ones analysts are reallv 
interested in. These answers, too. will 
be clues to why panel members react 
as they do to both program and com- 
mercial. 

Now the test proper I in this case a 
TV show). 

"As you watch this film recording 
of Live Like a Millionaire," explained 
the m.c, "numbers will flash on this 
small screen to the right at intervals 
throiighoul the show . \\ hen \ ou se - 
that number, look at your 'reaction 
sheet' for the corresponding number 
and put a check in one of the three 
boxes to the right of it. Check 'good' 
if you liked the part of the show im- 
mediately before the number flashed, 
'fair' if you thought it was only fair, 
and 'poor' if you didn't care for that 
part." 

Down went the lights, leaving just 
enough illumination for people to see 
their reaction sheets. On the screen 
flashed a kinescope recording of a re- 
cent edition of Live Like a Millionaire, 
General Mills' half-hour child-adult 
talent show. For the next 30 minutes 
the program was recreated, with some 
30 to 40 numbers thrown on the small- 
er screen at short intervals to get a 
continuous profile of reactions. Radio 
tests are similarly run, with off-the-air 
transcriptions used in place of kine- 
scope recordings. Numbers are flashed 
on the small screen, as in the TV ses- 
sions. 

With the biggest single piece of raw 
data recorded, showing of the kine- 
scope was followed by an open dis- 
cussion session. "What did you like or 
not like about this program?" was the 
challenging question. And the answers 
came tumbling in, taxing the m.c.'s 
ability to handle them all. 

"They shouldn't have put that vio- 
linist in with the ventriloquists and 
those others, that's not fair," declared 
a serious-looking young woman. "I 
didn't like that commercial where the 
little ai ids conscience spoke to her 
it wasn't very convincing." was the 
comment of a middle-aged man. 

At least 20 people were heard from. 
with occasional spontaneous applause 
from the group when someone got off 
a complaint or a compliment which 
most agreed with. 

The audience comments, copied 

down b\ an assistant m.c, are then 



read back to the panel in the form of 
questions. Everyone then gets a 
chance to "vote" on them — "Yes," 
"No Opinion,*' or "No." Often some 
extra questions are slipped in, ostensi- 
bly from previous panels, but actually 
things that the program's producer or 
agency, etc., would like to know. 

What comes out of the discussion 
period, like the answers on the ques- 
tionnaires, is not important in itself; 
but it serves as a valuable tool in ex- 
plaining the reactions which crop up 
during the test proper. 

A "free response" technique is fre- 
quently applied for measuring com- 
mercial effectiveness. Developed in co- 
operation with Dr. Harry Wolfe of 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet; Cliff Parsells, 
director of research at Ted Bates; and 
market research director Gordon 
Hughes of General Mills; it works like 
this. Immediatelv following a show 
everyone is asked to write down all 
the\ can remember about product 
names and sales points from the per- 
formance just seen. 

In addition the believability of com- 
mercials is measured. A free response 
test is run before the discussion peri- 
od, a belief test afterward. It's not un- 
common for a large proportion of the 
panel to remember product names, 
even some sales arguments — yet refuse 
to believe the claims. One of Schwer- 
in's warnings to advertisers: Remem- 
brance is fine, but make sure it's the 



right kind. 



Panel members are thanked and 
as thev leave drop off their test sheets, 
pick up some small gift. Afternoon 
housewives may get a small house- 
hold article, evening audiences an in- 
expensive fountain pen and a sample 
of some sponsors product. 

Next dav the real work begins. Stat- 
isticians, content and factor analysts 
begin organizing the information col- 
lected. A profile chart is one of the 
first steps; it shows the fluctuation in 
audience interest throughout the pro- 
gram. In order to make one up each 
persons reaction sheet answers are 
transferred by machine to an IBM 
punch card. A sorting machine then 
totals up the various reactions during 



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each part of the program, quickly gives 
a combined answer for the panel. 
"Free response," belief and other data 
collected from the audience is proc- 
essed in a similar way. 

Analysts listen to the tape recording 
of the session's discussion period, delve 
into questionnaires to find the "whys" 
of each heavy down-trend or upward 
curve. Copies of the finished report 
are then delivered or mailed to the cli- 
ent. It represents the combined effort 
of over 35 people in the Schwerin or- 
ganization, Which includes a public 
opinion expert and an anthropologist 
in addition to the statisticians and an- 
alysts. 

No client is ever "told" what to do 
with his program or commercial. He 
gets the unvarnished facts. The rest is 
up to him. * * * 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 41) 

yet. If he hollers loud enough, the 
seconds in his corner will provide the 
necessary reliefs to keep him in there 
swinging. 

As one of the handlers in radio's 
corner I've got to keep him in good 
physical condition, armed to the teeth 
with adventuresome programing am- 
munition. He's still young enough to 
enjoy new programing toys and play- 
mates, but not outmoded luxuries. 
We're not confining our search to 
Broadway or Sunset Boulevard. Ar- 
thur Godfrey was found in Washing- 
ton. So was Kate Smith. Patti Page, 
a current singing find, came up from 
Oklahoma. Radio stations all along 
the network are the spawning grounds 
for the kind of people who can help 
give us new ear entertainment at mini- 
mum costs. 

For instance, we've signed a couple 



RESULTS PROVE 

500,000 

MEXICANS IN GREATER 

LOS ANGELES 

LISTEN TO 6 HOURS OF 

SPANISH 

PROGRAMMING DAILY ON 

KWKW AND KWKW-FM 

ASK FOR JOE 



of delightful zanies named Gene Rav- 
burn and Dee Finch who do a refresh- 
ing disk jockey series on alert WNEW, 
New York. We'll give them a network 
chance. We plan to let the whole coun- 
trj in on a current West Coast vogue, 
Spade Cooley's Western Swing. We 
plan to take advantage of the miracles 
of tape recordings so adroitly used last 
season on our prize-winner, Hear It 
Now. We have several new ideas for 
its use, primed for the fall skein. A 
droll, new humorist, Roger Price, has 
an off-beat panel show and CBS is go- 
ing to give him both his heads. We 
are refurbishing several potential hits 
with new m.c.'s like Steve Allen step- 
ping into the Songs For Sale star slot. 

What we don't intend to do is give 
our fall network radio schedule pallid 
impersonations of TV shows or useless 
adrenalin for the kind of over-priced, 
over-stuffed shows that are of 1940 
radio vintage. 

Of course, with some of our new 
people and new ideas we; are going to 
fall fiat on our faces. We are willing 
to gamble as long as these new ideas 
help stimulate the greatest of advertis- 
ing media. Creative thinking realis- 
tically blended with 1951 price tags. 
That's how we intend to plan and exe- 
cute 1951 "s fall radio program sched- 
ule. Want to help? The door is open. 

Lester Gottlieb 

Director of Radio Programs 

CBS 

New York 

Radio program- 
ing this fall will 
differ from pre- 
vious years, in 
my opinion, prin- 
cipally in two 
ways. First, there 
will be available 
to the sponsor at 
lower cost than 
has ever pre- 
vailed in the in- 
dustry better programs in terms of tal- 
ent — of performers, writers, producers, 
directors. The sponsor will be able to 
make the most reasonable talent bins 
ever known. 

Second, this talent will be creating 
and producing better programs than 
ever, particularly in the dramatic field 
where programs will be designed espe- 
cially to utilize the quality of the medi- 
um for permitting the human imagina- 
tion to exercise full sway. In terms of 
drama and of better character estab- 



m 




Mr. Reeg 



value . . . PLUS 
BRUSH CREEK 
FOLLIES" 



w 




Wl 



ith 



HIRAM 
HIGSBY 

on 

KMBC 
KFRM 

PLUS ON£-"Brush Creek Follies" is 
in its fourteenth successful season! 
PLUS TWO— Playing again to a live 
audience from the stage of the huge 
new KMBC studio playhouse! 
PLUS THREE— A great new arrange- 
ment on commercials for advertisers! 
PLUS FOUR — An outstanding new 
promotion and merchandising plan! 
PLUS A DOZEN-Write, wire or 
phone KMBC-KFRM or your nearest 
Free and Peters colonel! 



KMBC 

of Kansas City 

K FRM 

for Rural Kansas 



• • • 6th oldest CBS Affiliate • • • 



Mr. H. James T hacker 
George D. Close, Inc. 
Los Angeles, Cat. 
Dear H. ].: 

Th' hometown uv WCHS, Charles- 
ton, West Virginny, is shore a radio 
lissenin town! 
F'rinstam e, on 
Won/lav nights 
35.2% uv th' 
homes has their 
radios turned 
on! An' y'know 
what. H. J.? 
55.6% uv them 
is turned ter 
WCHS an 

the\'s fire radio 
stations in town '. 
Yessir, WCHS 
o n 1/ o n d ay 
nights has 
m o r e ' n four 
limes th' lissen- 
ers as th' next 
rankin station. 
\<>w th'-t's th' 
sorta thin' folks 
like you orta 
tkeep in mind. 
V II. J. In Charles- 
ton, West Vir- 
ginny. when folks thinks uv radio, 
they thinks uv WCHS! 
Yrs. 
Algy 

WCHS 
Charleston, W. Va. 




2 JULY 1951 



57 



lishment and portrayal, radio program- 
ing this fall should reach a new high. 

Leonard Reeg 

Vice President jor Radio Programs 

ABC 

New York 



510 MADISON 

{Continued from page 11) 

'Front Page." All our sponsors have 
to do is "tell it to KIBL Latin Ameri- 
can announcers and let KIBL tell it to 
them."' The listening audience will re- 
spond to an incredible extent ... if I 
say "Go to C. R. Anthony and ask 
for Blackie Gutierrez, their Spanish 
clerk ... let him wait on ^ on" . . . 
sure enough they'll do just that . . . 
and they will buy from him whatever 
might be the articles advertised . . . 

Sincerely, your amigo, 

Al. Velazquez 

Spanish Program -Director -Producer 

KIBL 

Beeville, Tex. 



S MM"*' 



SELL. 



GAS * OIL'. 




LANG-WORTH 

FEATURE PROGRAMS. Int. 

113 W. 57th ST., NEW YORK 19. N. Y. 



Kttuvrk ('atitrc Prwams al Ctxal Statum Cost 



Congratulations on your article 
"How to win with Juan.'" Our interest 
goes much further than the fact that 
the article brought to light many im- 
portant facts concerning an almost for- 
gotten segment of our bustling popula- 
tion — a very large segment. 

Until recently, we have had a hard 
time convincing advertisers that these 
people existed, that they spend lots of 
money, and that they buy, in many 
cases, the same merchandise that every- 
one else buys. 

We have been serving the Fort 
Worth-Dallas area with a very fine 
Spanish language program since 1947. 
The air time we devote to this pro- 
gram has increased from 30 minutes a 
day in the beginning to three and one- 
half hours per day at present, and on 
many days even more time is needed 
to serve the many advertisers who have 
found the program profitable. 

This is the only Spanish language 
program in this area (there are no 
Spanish language newspapers) serving 
an area of 150 miles in all directions 
from Fort Worth with 1.000 watts non- 
directional. This includes Dallas. Fort 
Worth. Waco, Wichita Falls. Abilene 
and Tyler, to name some of the larger 
centers . . . some 34 North Texas coun- 
ties with a population of over two 
million. As a conservative figure we 
estimate that 125.000 of this popula- 
tion is Spanish-speaking, and it's grow- 
ing bv leaps and bounds. 

Lewis Love 
General Manager 
KWBC 
Fort Worth 



SPONSOR: IDEA SPARKER 

This is written as a tribute to spon- 
sor and its real effectiveness as a "use" 
magazine. 

Recently, and on very short notice, 
I was asked to give a talk to the Ad- 
vertising & Merchandising class of the 
Evening School of the University of 
Tennessee in Memphis. I agreed, and 
then came the awful business of "what 
will I talk about and when will T get 
time to get something together?" 

You probably know what I did. 
You're right! I started routing 
through current and old copies of 
SPONSOR for a topic. Of course, I found 
it — in the 12 March issue there was 
the swell article "How not to buy 
time." 

It provided a wonderful, meaty sub- 



ject, one that I could talk on easily 
I having been on the receiving end of 
too many bad buys I and one that pro- 
voked a lot of good questions. 

Here are my sincere thanks to you 
and sponsor for providing my dull 
brain with the right idea. 

Harold F. Walker 

Commercial Manager 

WDIA 

Memphis 



SPONSOR INDEX SHEETS 

A short while ago, you furnished 
subscribers with an index sheet show- 
ing a classification of SPONSOR articles 
by subject matter. 

Somewhere or other I have mislaid 
mine and would appreciate your send- 
ing me another one. 

C. Ross Littig, Jr. 

Radio Department 

J. Walter Thompson 

Chicago 

• Indev sheets to most SPONSOR articles are 
available to subscribers on request. 



FORUM HYPOS CALLS 

I thought you may be interested in 
knowing that your invitation to join 
the "Mr. Sponsor Asks" forum in the 
26 March issue was responsible for 
keeping our switchboard rather busy 
for a couple of days. 

Manv friends of mine, whom I 
haven't had a chance to see in the past 
few months, called and we had some 
pleasant hours of conversation. 

Bob Brenner 

Radio-TV Director 

Lenin. Williams & Saylor, Inc. 

Nerv York 



IN DANVILLE, VA. 

BUY THE 

OLD ESTABLISHED 



ESTABLISHED 1930 



HIGHLY RATED 

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AVERAGE WINTER 1951 

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58 



SPONSOR 



MBS-NEWSPAPER STATIONS 

Far be it from me to register a com- 
plaint, but just to set the records 
straight — in your Report to Sponsors, 
9 April, your story on ABC's million 
buck promotion in an effort to attract 
NBC's soapers includes the line that 
ABC has more newspaper-owned sta- 
tions than any other. For the informa- 
tion of your many readers, let it be 
known that Mutual has more than 150 
newspaper-owned stations. I am sure 
ABC has less than 100. 

Incidentally, may I say that SPONSOR 
gets better-looking with each issue. 

Frank Zuzulo 

Assistant Director of Press 

MBS 

New York 



SPONSORS DOWN ON RADIO? 

(Continued from page 27 I 

got were from salesmen calling on the 
agency who wanted some existing 
Miles advertising. As a matter of fact, 
no top executive went to Elkhart to 
call on the client. The client called on 
them. 

Q. Just how do you define creative 
selling? 

Kobak: Ideas are the heart of it. A 
creative salesman understands the cli- 
ent's problems. Then he examines his 
medium and develops an idea which 
can fill a specific need of the advertis- 
er. It's the exact opposite of 'me-too' 
selling. Or of trying to cut the com- 
petitor's throat through a deal. 

Q. Why is radio weak in selling? 

Kobak: On the whole, they got soft 
and fat. They had a gold brick tossed 
in their laps. For years all some sta- 
tions had to do was ride the networks 
and count their money. Now. when 



KLIX 



In one of the west's 

RICHEST MARKETS 

Idaho's Fabulous Magic Valley 



Ask Hollingbery 

ABC at 

Twin Falls, Idaho 



Frank C. Mclntyre 
V. P. and Gen. Mgr. 



they have to scratch gravel to beat hell, 
they haven't got the muscle. That goes 
for both stations and networks. Ac- 
tually, most of the executive level of 
stations is out of contact with adver- 
tisers. Management can't guide sales- 
men properly because it doesn't have a 
feel for the advertiser's problems. 

Q. What do advertisers themselves 
think of radio and its problems? 

Kobak: In my opinion advertisers still 
have faith in the medium. They still 
feel it is the best low-cost mass sales 
medium there is. They want to see it 
continue, but I think they're disturbed 
when they see that it does not operate 
on a business-like basis. 

Q. What business mistakes do you 
think radio is making — aside from its 
sales weaknesses? 

Kobak: For one thing, radio has not 
marshalled the facts to prove that it 
cannot operate if its rates are not kept 
up on a proper level. The magazines, 
for example, are going to management 
with charts and statistics on their ris- 
ing costs. They have shown that they 
need more revenue. 

Radio has higher costs, too. Actors 
get more, the musicians get more, all 
salaries are up; in fact, there is hardly 
a facet of radio operation which does 
not cost more than it did only a few 
years ago, though line costs are about 
the same. But the radio industry has 
failed to bring its case forcibly before 
advertisers. After all, as business men, 
they can appreciate the economics of 
this thing. 

Q. Do you mean that advertisers aire 
ready to listen sympathetically to ra- 
dio's problems? Arent they out to buy 
as cheaply as possible? 

Kobak: Of course, everyone wants to 
buy as efficiently as possible. But much 
of this pressure to pare radio prices is 
on the purchasing-agent level. Nat- 
urally, the man who's charged with 
the immediate business of buying 
wants to get the best price. But up on 
management levels I believe there is 
more concern with the bigger aspects 
of the problem. After all, top manage- 
ment men want the medium to continue 
in its value to them. They don't want 
to see so much pressure put on it that 
it's forced out of business. 

Q. What signs are there that radio is 
waking up to its problems? 

Kobak: This situation is somewhat 



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top-flight programs as Jack Benny, 
Arthur Godfrey, Lux Radio Theater, 
Amos cV Andy, Bing Crosby, Edgar 
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2 JULY 1951 



59 




GREENVILLE and SPARTANBURG 
SOUTH CAROLINA 

Twin textile cities of the South 
Carolina Piedmont, the contiguous 
counties have 313 industrial plants 
with total payrolls of 5110,000,000 
annually. Farms add another 
s ^29,000,000. The 315,048 people 
of Greenville and Spartanburg 
counties receive regular television 
service ONLY from WBTV, 
Charlotte. 



CABLE 

TELEVISION 

FOR 

3 



CAROLINIANS 



JEFFERSON STANDARD 
BROADCASTING COMPANY 





REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 
BY RADIO SALES 



like the depression in the Thirties. It 
takes a while before the people with 
real ability wake up to the facts. Then 
they act with twice the strength they 
usually have because it's an emergen- 
cy. Now I'd say within six months to 
a year you'll see radio working with 
real morale. Those radio ads CBS 
has been running, for example, will 
have a lot of effect on salesmen in 
building their confidence. All the net- 
works and many stations are going 
through a readjustment process. It's a 
good sign. And BAB will be a big 
help. 

Q. Is the series of meetings between 
the ANA and the Affiliates Committee 
part of the hopeful trend for radio? 

Kobak: Paul Morency. of WTIC. 
Hartford, chairman of the Affiliates 
Committee. Clair McCullough (com- 
mittee member and WGAL, Lancaster. 
Pa., president I . and myself attended 
an initial session with the ANA (spon- 
sor, 18 June ) . Both sides were grati- 
fied at the spirit shown by all who at- 
tended. It isn't appropriate for me to 
comment further on the meetings since 
Fritz Morency is spokesman. But I 
believe that out of the meetings we 
may get cooperative efforts by both 
broadcasters and advertisers. We'll 
find ways of working together to do 
the job both sides are supposed to do 
— sell goods. 

Q. That ties in with something you 
said earlier. What specifically can ra- 
dio men, do to learn how their medium 
sells for the advertiser? 

Kobak: Well. I've mentioned the use 
ol Nielsen food and drug index figures 
by advertisers to give them finger-tip 
control of their advertising effort. I 
believe broadcasters can take advan- 
tage of the same type of information. 
Nielsen, for example, has offered the 
networks general datr: on various cate- 
gories ol goods. These figures would 
gi\e them trends and help them under- 
stand what the advertiser need-. 

Q. (idling hack to what the industry 
can do to improve its position, do you 
have un\ specific suggestions/ 

Kobak: As I've tried to indicate, sell- 
ing is the ke\ . Salesmen must be 
trained not onl\ to understand the ad- 
vertiser's business and be able to show 
him what radio can do for him: the) 
must also be trained to understand the 
power of advertising. Manx radio sales- 
men just don't believe in advertising as 



much as their customers do. They 
haven't seen the evidence as first-hand 
the way advertising managers have. 

I remember back in Georgia when I 
was a voung electrical engineer that I 
used to spend some time in the office 
of the Atlanta Georgian. I'd see Ne- 
groes waiting in line to put a classified 
ad in that paper. They didn't have 
enough education to be able to write 
the ad themselves, but they'd spend 
their last dollar on an ad to get a job. 
They had faith in advertising. But 
would a radio salesman buy an ad if 
he were out of a job? And salesmen 
must believe in what they're selling to 
hold a job. 

Q. Do you believe, radio needs more 
basic research to help sell advertisers? 

Kobak: I believe more basic research 
would be helpful, but I don't think it's 
the heart of the problem. Radio needs 
to understand how advertisers sell 
more than it needs new figures about 
radio. That's the basic research they 
ought to do. Once they do that, they'll 
be able to go to advertisers with ideas 
instead of continually trying to outdo 
one another in deals and concessions. 

Q. Can you cite an example of how 
attention to a client's selling problems 
helps a medium? 

Kobak: 1 remember back some years 
ago at McGraw-Hill that we felt we 
didn't understand how industrial oil 
was bought. So we spent over $100,- 
000 on a comprehensive survey. The 
net result has been millions of dollars 
worth of industrial oil advertising in 
McGraw-Hill papers. We learned more 
about the distribution of industrial oils 
than ad managers in the field knew up 
till then. It turned us into creative 
salesmen in that field. 

Q. Hon would you sum up all that 
we've discussed about radios present 
problems anil its future? 

Kobak: First, advertisers aren't fight- 
ing radio. The) want it to continue 
strong. Second, I think radio's awak- 
ening is coining during the course of 
this year. The big problem is creative 
selling and eliminating deals. * * * 



E Write, Produce, Ship 
TV film spots, complete. 

TELEFILM, Inc. 

HOLLYWOOD (28) CALIFORNIA 



60 



SPONSOR 



TV DICTIONARY 

{Continued from page 35) 

FLARE Bright reflection flashing as a 
light from a mirror, usually from shiny 
appliances. Picked up by camera, flare 
usually creates an unwanted blacked- 
out splotch in the picture. Can be 
eliminated either by powdering or wax- 
ing appliance, and sometimes by 
changing the angle of shooting. 

FLASH An extremely short TC scene. 

FLASH BACK Or cutback or extract 
from earlier action. To return to a 
previously shown action. 

FLAT 1 1 ) Lack of contrast in a TV 
picture or telecast film. <2) A board 
or other surface used in set construc- 
tion; also referred to as a two-fold or 
three-fold flat depending on the num- 
ber of folding wings on it. 

FLAT LIGHTING Lighting a scene or 
set with over-all brightness which does 
not provide any highlights or contrast 
or modeling of the stage or actors. 
Usually poor technique. 

FLAT-PAINTED Lettering or artwork 
that is not cutout or in relief. 

FLICK Page -turning method of 
change-over from one Balop to an- 
other. 

FLICKER Fluctuations in the over-all 
brightness of pictures. Not encountered 
in normal television operations. 

FLIES Space above the studio or stage 
extending from the top of the setting 
to the roof, housing the grid, flying ap- 
paratus, stationary drop mikes, lights. 

FLIP Command to turn to next card 
on easel shots. 

FLOOD or SCOOP Any light used to il- 
luminate wide areas, usually a Kleig 
light of 5 KW. 

FLOOD LIGHTING Focusing full bril- 
liance of ceiling and spotlights on 
scene. A lighting similar to flat light- 
ing where flatness of the light is not 
supposed to spoil detail. 

FLOOR MANAGER or STAGE MANAGER 

Director's link with talent during 
show. Official on the floor of the tele- 
vision studio who, under the eye of the 
director, supervises production while 
a program is on the air and relays di- 
rections to various personnel. 

FLOOR PLAN Scaled print or plan of 
studio or stage upon which are marked 
the location of walls, settings, door- 
ways, sound effects, working areas, etc. 
This floor plan is a prerequisite to all 
developments and is used by the pro- 
ducer-director to plot action, camera 
shots, and business prior to rehearsals 
in the actual setting. 

FLUFF or BEARD Any mistake, action, 
word, or phrase accidentally included 
or in any way distorted, resulting in 
an imperfect sound or picture. 

2 JULY 1951 



FLUORESCENT BANKS A type of 'cold" 
light used in the television studio for 
flat or fill light. 

FLUORESCENT LIGHT Mercury-vapor 
tubes coated inside with one of a num- 
ber of materials which fluoresce, or 
glow, when exposed to the discharge 
inside a mercury-vapor tube. Used in 
TV as flat fill or balancing light. 

FLUTTERING Unsteady images on 
filmed show usually caused by buckled 
film in projector of poorly developed 
print. 

FLY To pull above the set the lights, 
scenery, or' properties in order to fa- 
cilitate camera shos, shifting, storage. 

FLY IT Any suspended microphone, 
drop, etc. 



GAFFER Electrician on TV show who 
really understands the limitation of 
the TV camera. 

GAFFOON Engineer, shader, or sound 
man who efficiently does two or three 
effects at the same time. 

GAG A joke or comedy situation or 
device. '"Gag show" is made up of a 
succession of jokes or alleged jokes. 

GAIN The increase in volume of sound 
obtained in the amplifier from which 
the audio engineer adjusts the sound 
portions of a TV show. 

GEN. LOCK System of interlocking 
sync-generators between remote and 
studio. 

GET HOT (li Ad lib musical improvi- 
sation. The equivalent of "Jazz it up." 
(2) Direction to talent to start project- 
ing, get into their parts. 

GETAWAY An offstage means of de- 
scent from raised flooring areas with- 
in a set. Also a passageway behind 
settings. 

GHOST Unwanted image appearing in 
television picture usually as a result 




of signal 
sion. 



reflection during transmis- 



vice or "angle" used as an attraction 
for attention. 

GIVE Order to actors to become more 
a part of their character and to get 
into their parts and act more convinc- 
ingly. 

GIZMO Generic term. In TV, some- 
thing for which a more technical defi- 
nition is lacking or else has been for- 
gotten altogether by the speaker. 

GLASS SHOT Shot of action in a set- 
ting only part of which is constructed 
full-size, the remainder usually paint- 
ed or applied photographically in mini- 




GIMMICK <1) Particular quality, 
planned characteristics, or quirk which 
sets off a commercial or program from 
others that resemble it. <2> Any de- 



ature on a sheet of glass suspended a 
short distance in front of the camera 
in such a position that the miniature 
will appear to be in the same scale as, 
and to merge with, the more distant 
full-size set seen through the clear 
part of the glass. Gives correct effect 
of depth and perspective. 

GOBO or FLAG A mat. Used to shield 
camera from lights. 

GO-HUNTING Turning a television 
cameraman loose to find interesting 
shots on a spontaneous program or any 
other program. 

GOOSENECK Mike which hangs from 
a gallows-support for use over tables 
when the talent is seated. Sometimes 
called a gallows mike. 

GRAY SCALE Achromatic color scale 
of a 10-step transition from white 
through grays to black where the in- 
termediate grays differ from each oth- 
er only through a proportional admix- 
ture of white and black. 

GRAY SCREEN Iconoscope chain with- 
out picture. 

GREEN SCALE Relatively new color 
theory that advocates use of five basic 
green colors for greater eye appeal 
and definition on screen. Vastly super- 
ior to old mixture of grays, miller gray 
scale, which used mixture of blacks 
and white pigments to get grays. 

GRID or GRIDIRON Metal framework 
close to the studio roof to which are 
anchored drop mikes, backdrops, props, 
scenery, lights, etc. 

GRIEF Any kind of agency, program, 
talent, etc., trouble. 

GRIP (DA handy man about the set. 
equivalent of a stagehand. (2) Studio 
or scenic carpenter. 



61 



They helped build the TV Dictionary /Handbook . . . 




B. TILLSTROM, Creator, "Kukla, Fran, Ollie" GERALD VERNON, TV Mgr., ABC-TV, Chi. BEULAH ZACHARY, Prod., "Kukla, Fran, Ollie" 



GROUND GLASS The glass in the TV 
camera viewing system on which the 
picture is projected for viewing by 
cameraman. 

GROUND ROW Any natural materials 
or small scenery pieces placed in front 
of main backgrounds to make a scene 
more real, or often used to make strip 
lights. 

GUIDE SHEET Schedule to outline the 
various routine rehearsals, details, etc., 
of a TV program. 



H 



HALATION Blurred or halo spread of 
the light from parts of the image due 
to reflection or dispersal of light. 

HALF-LAP Control technique by which 
two pictures in a dissolve or overlap 
are both held at maximum simultane- 
ous definition (50% each) so that both 
are visible to viewers. 

HAMBONE An unconvincing black- 
face dialectician. 

HAM-FEST The post mortem where 
talent and personnel are discussing a 
just concluded TV presentation. 

HAM IT To over-act or over-play in 
any way, or to over-emphasize one's 
part in a production. 

HAND PROPS Movable materials of 
all kinds which are used by actors in 
their respective roles, or other small 
items used to dress a set. 

HARDNESS (1) Excessive contrast in 
telecast image. (2) Undesirable de- 
gree of realism in portraying heavy 
roles. 

HASH SESSION A meeting of the di- 
rector, writer, talent, etc., following 
the final rehearsal, and before the tele- 
cast to discuss final changes. 

HASSEL Meaning complete state of 
flux; everything going wrong. 

HAYWIRE Temporary equipment or 
that in poor condition. 



HEAD ROOM Area between the ac- 
tor's head and the actual top of set. 
This area is important in relation to 
the amount of upward camera move- 
ment possible without overshooting 
sets. 

HEADS AND TAILS Applied to the be- 
ginning and end of any TV film se- 
quence. "Heads" means beginning of 
sequence; "tails" the end. Used to sig- 
nify the position of film on a reel. 

HEARTBREAKER A commercial TV au- 
dition made on speculation. Usually 
with little chance of being accepted. 

HEAVY Professional casting term 
usually meaning the villain. 

HEROIC Outsize prop, object, set . . . 
larger than life. Alan Young uses such 
sets frequently in his TV shows. 

HIATUS The summer period, usually 
eight weeks, during which a sponsor 
and/or talent may discontinue his pro- 
gram, but thereafter resume his time 
period or show until the next hiatus. 

HIGH HAT An elevated camera mount 
for use on table top or other pickups 
of waist-high objects. 

HIGH KEY Pictures whose tones all lie 
toward the lighter end of the scale. 
Low key — picture whose tones are at 
darker end of scale. Also applies to 
degree and contrast of lighting on im- 
age, set, etc. 

HIGHLIGHT Emphasizing a subject or 
scene by special painting or lighting 
effects to make subject stand out from 
the rest of the picture. Lighting may 
be rim lighting, halo effects, silhou- 
ettes, etc. 

HIT or HIT IT A sudden and emphatic 
attack by music. 

HITCH-HIKE An isolated commercial 
for one of the sponsor's products (not 
advertised in the main body of the 
show) which is given a free ride after 
the end of the program proper. 

HOG-CALLING CONTEST A strenuous 
commercial audition for talent or an- 
nouncers possessing special qualities, 
plus a good voice. 



HOLD IT DOWN Sound command to 
the engineer at controls or to talent 
to reduce volume. Lighting command 
to engineer to reduce intensity of spot. 

HOOK (1) In writer's parlance, it 
means to give a surprise ending. (2) 
A program device used to attract tangi- 
ble response from the audience; e.g., 
an offer, a contest, etc. (3) A suspense 
ending that concludes an episode or 
serial. 

HOOPERATING An almost generic 
term for a program's audience-rating 
as determined by the C. E. Hooper, 
Inc., quantitative audience-measure- 
ment service. 

HORSE OPERA TV presentation pri- 
marily composed of gunshots, fights, 
chases, and occasionally a plot. Also 
called oat opus or oater. 

HOT Too much light on talent, set, 
etc. 

HOT BACKGROUND Background light 
which is too strong and results in lack 
of contrast and undesirable flat pic- 
ture. However, may be used to pro- 
duce special dramatic effects for sil- 
houettes, etc., especially on such shows 
as Garroway at Large (NBC -TV). 

HOT CANARY A high soprano; an 
excellent and very telegenic female 
singer. 

HOT LIGHT Concentrated beam of 
light used to emphasize features, pro- 
files or contours. Usually a pinpoint 
spot. 3/4 KW. 

HOT SWITCH The rapid transfer of 
scene, show, or program from one 
originating point to another. 

HOUSE SHOW A package TV show 
usually owned, written, and directed 
by a station or network; in contrast 
to an agency show which is owned by 
an advertising agency. 

HYPO To add vitality and interest to 
a program by changing its format, 
cast, agency, producer, writer or, some- 
times, its sponsor. 



62 



SPONSOR 



I 



IATSE International Alliance of Thea- 
trical Stage Employes. TV stage hands 
belong to this union. 

IBEW International Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers. Light technicians, 
engineers and some soundmen belong 
to this union. 

ICONOSCOPE The earlier camera pick- 
up tube used in the RCA TV system. 
(See image-orthicon.) 

ID TV station identification, or call 
letters. Film ID — announcing that the 
program televised is or was reproduced 
from film. 

IDEAL TIME A timing on a script that 
is obtained by back-timing and indi- 
cates the desired pace of the telecast. 

IDIOT SHEET Cue sheets attached to 
the front of the camera (below the 
lens) as well as blackboard and print- 
ed reminder sheets out of camera range. 

IMAGE The photographic likeness as 
recorded on a TV tube, kine, or film. 

IMAGE-ORTHICON The current su- 
per-sensitive camera tube developed 
by RCA which is capable of picking up 
scenes in semi-darkness or without ex- 
cessive lighting. 

IMPRESSIONISM Building up of gen- 
eral impression in a film by joining 
together a series of shots of subjects 
which in actuality are disconnected in 
space or time or both. 

IN THE CAN Completed TV film pro- 
gram or commercials that have been 
checked, found O.K. and are in metal 
containers ready for shipping. 

IN THE MUD (1) A lifeless delivery 
visually and/or sound-wise with very 
uninteresting quality, resulting from 
a speaker's or actor's improper pitch, 
stage presence, or lack of material. 
(2) The sound heard when the voice is 
spoken into a closed "mike" and picked 
up faintly on a live "mike" at a dis- 
tance. 

INCANDESCENT LIGHT Light produced 
by the heating of a strip of a con- 
ductor or the burning of an arc be- 
tween two electrodes. Usually very rich 
in red values. 

INDEPENDENT STATION Station which 
is not owned by a network. 

INGENUE Female TV performer with 
a youthful, pleasant voice and appear- 
ance of approximately 16 to 24 years. 

INHERITED AUDIENCE The portion of 
a program's audience which listened 
to the preceding show on the same sta- 
tion. 

INKY Usually pertains to any incan- 
descent lamp as opposed to fluorescent. 

INSERT Any explanatory item, usu- 
ally a CU, and written, such as a let- 
ter, sign, trademark, or label. 



INSTITUTIONAL Type of TV presen- 
tation designed to build good will and 
confidence or promote the firm or in- 
stitution sponsoring the show rather 
than its specific products. 

INTERCUTTING Similar to a visual 
montage or reverse angle shots. Con- 
sists of a succession of very short 
scenes or flashes of the same scene 
from different angles. 

INTEREST FILM Film which deals 
with a non-fictional subject in a pop- 
ular manner. 

INTERFERENCE Disturbance of TV 
reception caused by undesirable sig- 
nals such as airplanes, automobiles, 
FM radio station, and hams. 

INTERIOR DIALOGUE The TV appli- 
cation of soliloquy and the aside. It's 
a "stream-of-consciousness" technique 
given great impetus by Dragnet, Jack 
Benny, etc. 

INTERLACING The U.S. TV picture 
scanning system whereby the odd num- 
bered lines are then filled in or super- 
imposed to create one frame or com- 
plete picture entirely void of flicker. 

IRE Institute of Radio Engineers. 

IRIS Adjustable diaphragm in front 
of the lens in TV camera which is used 
to reduce the picture area for special 
effects. (See lenses.) 

IRIS IN Also circle in. The gradual 
appearance of a picture from a small 
spot until it fills the picture through 
constantly enlarging circle. 

IRIS OUT Reverse action of the above 
in which the circle closes down until 
it disappears. 



JAM High-pressure selling talk on a 
TV commercial. 

JEEP A moving image on the face of 
a television set which is itself to be 
televised, as in commercials for TV 
sets. 

JIC Just in case. 

JUICER A TV electrician. 

JUMP To omit previously planned 
shot, shots, action, or musical number. 

JUMP CUE When an actor, soundman, 
switcher, or musical director antici- 
pates his action and performs before 
the proper time. 

JUVENILE TV talent whose appear- 
ance and/or voice carries an age qual- 
ity of 17 to 24. 



K 



KEY The "tone" of a show or scene, 
high or low. A high-keyed scene is usu- 
ally played with a fast pace and in an 



excited manner as the Milton Berle 
show. Low key is usually done In a 
slower pace and is more subdued as 
Garroway at Large. 

KEY LIGHTS Sufficient illumination. 

KEY NUMBERS Footage numbers 
marked along edge of film at intervals. 

KICK BACK or TABU Any form of se- 
cret rebate on rates or talent, etc. 

KILL To strike out or remove part or 
all of a scene, set, action, or show. 

KINE or KINESCOPE (1) Technique 
developed by RCA to record rather in- 
expensively on film complete TV pro- 
grams. (2) Tube used in receivers or 
monitors on which the television pic- 
ture is reproduced. Trade name as de- 
veloped by RCA. 

KLEIG LIGHTS or SCOOPS A patented 
type of wide angle lights, usually 1500 
KW, famous because of their long use 
on the stage, now used in TV. 

KLINKER An incorrectly played musi- 
cal note that stands out in a TV show. 



LADY MACBETH High emotional, 
over-acted tragedienne performance. 

LAP DISSOLVE Cross fading of one 
scene or image over another. Momen- 
tarily both pictures are visible. One 
picture disappears as another picture 
appears. 

LASHING FLATS To fasten flats to- 
gether by their cords or lash lines. 

LAUGH IT UP Order to talent to laugh 
at their own lines. 

LAY AN EGG Show, or part of a show, 
or gag that is a total failure, does not 
go over. 

LEAD <1) The most important role in 
a dramatic show. (2) The actor or 
actress who plays the lead role. 

LEAD-IN Words spoken by announcer 
or narartor at the beginning of some 
shows to perform a scene-setting or re- 
capitulation function. 

LEAD-IN SPIRAL Blank, spiral groove 
at the beginning of a transcription 
record to guide reproducing needle in- 
to sound grooves. 

LEAD SHEET (l)The cues or leads to 
guide the musical director. (2) Notes 
to guide cameramen in shots coming 
up. 

LEADER or LEAD (1) Blank film at- 
tached to the beginning of reel to 
thread in projector so that it can run 
up to speed before first scene is pro- 
jected. (2) Blank film at end of reel. 

LEFT or STAGE LEFT Direction mean- 
ing to the talent's left as he faces 
camera. 

i To be continued next issue I 



2 JULY 1951 



63 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



Fall Facts Issue No. 5 

In its first year sponsor dedicated 
one of its mid-summer issues to the 
ambitious task of briefing advertisers 
and advertising agencies on the best 
fall buys in time, talent, and programs; 
how to use broadcast advertising to 
best advantage. 

Probably because the idea was 
unique, and because it rendered a val- 
uable service. Fall Facts No. 1 was 
happily received. The large surplus 
print order was exhausted in no time; 
we caught wind of "dollars and cents" 
utility in many quarters. 

With Fall Facts Nos. 2. 3, and 4. 
the annual mid-summer edition became 
a recognized tool for buyers of radio 
and television. 

Now comes Fall Facts No. 5, to be 
out 16 July. The annual chore should 
be growing easier — but actually No. 5 
is the roughest yet. It seems as though 
radio and TV have been caught in 
whirlpool of problems, rotating with 
e\ :m -increasing speed. 

But the ver) complexity of the sit- 



uation makes the job which Fall Facts 
No. 5 has set out to do more important 
than any of its predecessors. Within 
the framework of six sections (spot 
ladio, network radio, spot TV. network 
TV. over-all. radio basics I sponsor 
intends to create order out of chaos. 
How well we can interpret and guide 
and report is the test of our ability. 

Radio's upward push 

Some thoughtful national advertisers 
have noted that radio broadcasters are 
pushing out of their second valley of 
despair. And they believe that this 
time the progress will continue with 
benefit both to buyer and seller. 

Radio broadcasters sunk into their 
first valley two summers ago, when the 
TV bug hit advertisers hard and de- 
spair hit the broadcasters harder. They 
hit bottom again some months ago un- 
der the impact of the ANA reports, net- 
work rate slashes, network cancella- 
tions, and sponsor downgrading. 

Reversing the psychological road- 
block that has kept national advertisers 
from seeing radio in its full glory, 
here's what's happening: 

1. The ANA and the Affiliates Com- 
mittee are working together. They 
want to understand each other's prob- 
lems. 

2. Throughout the U. S.. networks 
and stations are selling radio via ra- 
dio to their sizable audiences. Among 
the listeners are many advertisers and 
agency executives who are learning 
some of the basic facts of radio. 

3. Stations like WLS. WNBC. and 
K\W are developing merchandising 
plans that make sense to national, re- 
gional, and local advertisers. Many 
others l including WLW, WWL, KSTP. 
WOV, WIBW. WCHS. WING. KFI. 



KLZ. WFDF, WKY, KGNC, WAVE, 
KCMO to mention only a handful I are 
stepping up their already effective mer- 
chandising. 

4. More stations are generating 
ideas. Clinics like those arranged by 
BMI and APS are stimulating effective 
program and sales ideas. 

5. The BAB is getting up a good 
head of steam. Sales aids that will help 
the advertiser understand radio are in 
the making. 

6. Many a national advertiser is 
alarmed at the downgrading of a val- 
uable advertising medium. He wants 
broadcasters to regain confidence in 
themselves so that they can do an in- 
creasingly effective job for him. The 
influence of such men as Charles 
Beardsley of Miles, Lowry Crites of 
General Mills, A. N. Halverstadt of 
P&G will be felt. 

Radio vs. newspaper gains 

Geyer, Newell & Ganger has come up 
with an interesting circulation analysis 
of 168 newspapers in 62 television cit- 
ies. Although these papers, in combi- 
nation, lost 40,000 daily circulation 
during 1948 and 1949. they picked up 
about 650,000 during 1950. 

Not bad, is it? 

But radio did better. Some 14,000,- 
000 radio sets were produced and sold 
during 1950. Let's be conservative and 
say that only 5,000,000 went into the 
62 TV markets, which represent 60% 
of the total population of the U. S. 
That would give radio set sales an 
eight to one advantage over newspaper 
sales pickup. 

And, according to BBDO. even in a 
TV home the radio is tuned on two 
hours and ten minutes daily. 

Wheee — what a storv for radio! 



Applause 



More power to . . . 

Ralston-Purina, who expressed their 
appreciation to the many farm direc- 
tors the) sponsor b) feting them roy- 
ally, arranging excursions during the 
summer meeting of tin- RFDers held 
in St. Louis last month. \ml to \\l'. 
who junketed them to Arkansas on a 
-i" ial outing. 

Ed Madden, \BC-T\ vice president, 
\s Ik >><■ Hofstra stu<l\ \<>. 2 goes a long 
wa\ toward taking the mvsterv out of 
TV results. 



Avoo Manufacturing Corp., whose 
big L950 sales and advertising push 
increased sales over 1949 nearly 
100%; (aminos 300%. Aided by 
strong air campaigns, Vvco posted net 
sales of $256,966,97] in L950. 
Allen Woodall, president of WDAK, 
Columbus, Ga., who celebrated the sta- 
tion's biggest month by surprising his 
entire stall (including wives and dates I 
with a two-daj chartered plane trip to 
Daytona Beach, I' la. The vacation was 
titled "Operation \ ictorj . 
Jack Van Volkenburg, CBS and 



CBS-TV vice president, who picked the 
right man to help advertisers clear TV 
time in Fritz Snyder, ex-Bulova and ex- 
Biow. 

Leo Burnett Co., which is helping 
big midwest advertisers realize that 
Chicago has every facility to make an 
ad campaign click. 

National Assn. of Radio and TV 
Station Representatives, who unani- 
mously elected respected, know-how 
Murrav Grabhorn as managing direc- 
tor, thereby assuring themselves a do- 
something organization. 



64 



SPONSOR 



'* 



Imtticd. 



'*h 



^ 



r *^^F 



r a I. 



It's the 



Team ...am 



// 



Consumers in the Heart of Amer- 
ica buy wisely — but certainly 
WHOLEHEARTEDLY ! 

Evidence of this statement is the 
fact that, while the greater 
Kansas City Metropolitan Area is 
now 17th in the nation in popula- 
tion, it ranks 15th in retail sales! 
And -KANSAS CITY MAKES 
A BETTER SHOWING IN 
RETAIL SALES BASED ON 
POPULATION THAN ANY 
OTHER CITY IN THE NA- 
TION'S "TOP TWENTY!"* 

The analysis is simple enough. 
The powerful and popular voice 
of The KMBC-KFRM Team is do- 
ing a wholehearted job in the 
great Kansas City Area for its 
advertisers. The Team "has the 
audience" by a margin of almost 
3 to 2 over all other broadcasters, 
according to the latest audience 
surveys. 

In the city — on farms, now more 
than ever before, consumers are 
responding to the sales mes- 
sages heard on KMBC-KFRM. 
Get the benefit of the most power- 
ful selling force in the rich Heart 
of America. Write, wire or phone 
KMBC-KFRM or your nearest 
Free & Peters Colonel. 

* 1951 Sales Management Survey 
of Buying Power. 



•■•vH. 1 'I 



£* 



5c 



11111 



■ill 



To sell the whole Heart 
of America, Wholeheart- 
edly, use .... 



f 



The 



Team 



6TH OLDEST CBS AFFILIATE 



PROGRAMMED BY KMBC 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY MIDLAND BROADCASTING COMPANY 



in West 
Virginia . . 

your 

dollar "" 
goes 
farther 
with 
"personality" 



More than a million 
West Virginians, (with 
a half-billion dollars to 
spend annually) can hear your 
sales story when you put this 
potent pair of "Personality" 
Stations to work for 
you. And WKNA and 
WJLS are yours at a 
combination rate that 
about the same as you 
would pay for any single 
comparable station i 
either locality. Make 
prove it! 




51 



-?<■ I ,- ^CHARLESTON - 



S5- 
2 

o 
S3 

<S>. 

£■+. 

CO 
c-t. 

P 

el- 
's*. 
O 
S3 

CO 




WKNA 



WKNA-FM 

CHARLESTON 

950 KC— ABC 

5000 W DAY* 1000 W NIGHT 



WJLS 

WJLS-FM 

BECKLEY 

560 KC — CBS 

1000 W DAY* 500 W NIGHT 



I 



Joe L. Smith, Jr., Incorporated 
Represented nationally by WEED & CO. 



$8.00 a Year 




FALL FACTS ISSUE: 1951 



TV Map 



generm l 



* WKEFEUEH PLAZ , , r ., v - 



Four foldout pages including stations 
by cities, sets, reps, nets, etc. 

pages 131-134 



Spot radio 

Best buys, costs, trends, programing of 
booming market-by-market medium 

pages 65-105 



Network radio 


l buys, trends, audience, pro- 


ning, costs on the national nets 


pages 43-63 




M-V V 




I. any ^| 




K ^^k 


k > r ^Hfer'^n 



Ruth Lyons, WLW-TV star, is NBC- 
TV model of morning participation 
trend that looms important this fall 



Radio basics 


14 pages of vital charts and data on 


the world's biggest mass medium 


pages 107-128 



Spot TV 



Costs, trends, commercials, availa- 
bilities on stations in 62 markets 

pages 137-146 




McCann-Erickson New York timebuyers 
go into a huddle on fall plans: I. to r. 
Percival, Gemtzel, Reuschle, Kelly, Fesler 



Network TV 

Trends, programing, audience, costs. 
availabilities day and night 

pages 149-160 



Over-all 



cost-cutting, research, contests, 
>miums, union 



Pages 163-188 



TV Dictionary 

Part four of Herb True's remarkable 
compilation of L000 TV terms 

pages 190-197 



What 24 sponsors 
will do this fall 

Campaigns previously reported cate 
gorized and brought up-to-date 

pages 32-37 




"I would rather be right than president" 




Statue of Henry Clay 



Virginia-born Henry Clay, thrice nominated to be 
president, was willing to forego the highest honor 
in America for his convictions. Independence of 
thought and loyalty to principle has long been 

characteristic of the Virginian. The First Stations 
of Virginia (WMBG, WCOD-FM and WTVR-TV) profit by 

these qualities. The friendship and loyalty of 
listeners and viewers in the Old Dominion go all out for 
Havens and Martin sponsors. 



WMBG am WCOD m 



Havens & Martin Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
Represented nationally by John Blair & Company 




WTYR 



TV 



FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 




SPOT RADIO BOOM ACCEL ERATING THIS FALL — You can expect new sponsors, expanded 
budgets for already booming spot radio this fall. Wildroot, which recently dropped 
"Charlie Wild" detective drama on CBS-TV, will return to spot radio in heavy na- 
tional campaign in addition to "FBI In Peace and War" on CBS radio. Bromo-Seltzer 
is also planning an extensive spot radio campaign. Cold remedies will be big fall- 
winter users, with reps noting earlier-than-ever placement of business by buyers 
anxious to insure prime availabilities. 

WHAT'S HOTTEST TIME PERIOD? — Early morning, once regarded as "marginal time," is 
now rated most in demand by many reps. In particular, 7:00 to 8:00 a.m. period 
enjoys high popularity among advertisers anxious to harness appeal of "morning 
men" (SPONSOR, 2 July). There's much interest, too, in late-evening hours, 
SPONSOR survey indicates. (For details, see page 70 of spot radio section.) 

SITUATION CO MEDY ON UPSWING IN TV PROGRAMIN G— -Fall will see more situation- 
comedy programing on TV, including several TV versions of long-time radio favorites 
(details, page 152). Explaining its own addition of several situation stanzas in 
recent months, KMTV, Omaha, told SPONSOR: "It appears easier to maintain a high 
level of comedy on this type of program than on other types of comedy shows. Tele- 
vision just burns up too much material on the rapid-fire gag type of comedy shows." 

LOOK FOR NEW NAMES AMONG NET RADIO SPONSORS — With business giants, long 
mainstay of net radio, dropping prime shows to concentrate dollars in TV, net sales 
departments will be gunning for firms which could never previously get into web 
radio because of costs and/or lack of availabilities. Problem nets face is to lick 
feeling that radio is old hat and show advertisers opportunities which still exist 
in medium. "My Friend Irma" (CBS), "Judy Canova" (NBC) are typical of top pack- 
ages now available which most medium-sized firms couldn't even dream of sponsoring 
in previous years. (For outlook on new network sponsors, see page 63 of Network 
Radio section. ) 

AM STATIONS "TV-PRO OFI NG" THEIR P ROGRAMING— Advertisers studying fall lineups 
of shows on stations in TV markets will note changes designed to make stations less 
vulnerable to loss of audience to TV. Example: Kevin Sweeney, KFI, Los Angeles, 
general sales manager, told SPONSOR station has been "building series of TV-proof 
programs." Theory is to give listeners something they can't get from TV. All-talk 
programs have been emphasized, following discovery that station's late-afternoon 
Burritt Wheeler commentary showed continuing rise in ratings from '49 through '51. 
Another innovation is "This Is Our Town," taped show by station's farm reporter 
which covers communities 100 miles away on fringe of TV area. (Other spot radio 
programing trends, page 72.) 



SPONSOR. Volume 5, No. 15. 16 July 1951. Published biweekly bj SPONSOK Publ I I lm Ave.. Baltimore. \i Editorial, Circulation Office 

510 Madison Ave.. New York 22, (8 a real In I S 9 ol ewhere I ri 1 as second els r 29 .Tanuar; Baltimore Ml postofflce under \ I March 1879. 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 16 Jiil.y 1951 

HOW FLEXIBLE CAN NET RADIO GET? — Net radio salesmen will be stressing medium's 
flexibility as webs continue their adjustment to TV inroads. Shorter time periods, 
tandem-style buys, will be continuing trend. Actually, nets have long had device 
for giving sponsors flexibility in way their markets are covered via local cut-ins 
beaming separate sales messages to different territories. Recent example of tech- 
nique on grand scale is P & G use of "Welcome Travellers" (NBC) to push as many as 
6 different products in separate areas of U. S. (see page 55). 

MARGARINE WAGES EIGHT FOR ACCEPTANCE VIA RADIO — With liftng of Illinois re- 
strictions on yellow margarine, Good Luck margarine (Lever Bros.) has bought pro- 
gram over WBBM, Chicago, designed to introduce product. Show originates in super 
markets, is quiz with grocery prizes for shopper participants. Program, called 
"Good Luck to You," will also invite listeners to compete in $16,000 Good Luck 
jingle contest for Illinois residents only. As more states abolish restrictions 
against yellow margarine, you'll be hearing about similar local program buys by 
Good Luck and other margarines. 

DAYTIME TV EXPANDING THIS FALL — American Home Products will buy program in 
12:15 to 12:30 p.m. slot on CBS-TV for show yet to be chosen. In following quarter 
hour will be P & G, also yet to set show at press time. Move by two firms is part 
of trend to stake out franchises in daytime TV which began in late 1950, will ac- 
celerate this fall. 

ROSS SURVEY FINDS THERE'S MORE TV PROGRAMING, LOWER RATINGS FOR ALL SHOW 
TYPES — Ross Reports survey of TV programing in New York found number of quarter 
hours programed jumped from 1,694 in May 1950 to 2,067 in 1951. Ratings, mean- 
while dropped. In January-June 1950, average Pulse rating of all shows in New York 
was 7.69. By same period this year, ratings had dropped 2.32 to 5.37. Says Ross: 
"No program category has as high a rating today as enjoyed last year. Current high 
is 15.4% for Drama and Mystery (19.3% in '50) as opposed to peak of 21.4% averaged 
by Comedy-Variety in Jan. -June '50 (this year — 12.8%)." 

RTMA SPENDING $100,000 TO DISCOVER SET-BUY INC PATTERN— Est imat ing TV sets in 

markets is made difficult, among other rea sons, because no one really knows what 
happens to set once it leaves retailer's floor. Same applies to AM and FM sets. 
To simplify tallying problem and gain valuable marketing guidance, Radio and TV 
Manufacturers' Association will spend $100,000 on survey covering AM, FM, TV set 
distribution. When completed, it should indicate from how far away consumers come 
to buy sets. 

RCA IOINS COLOR BATTLE IN EARNEST — With start of public demonstrations of RCA 
compatible color, battle between rival electronic-broadcast empires is on in ear- 
nest. Consumers will get barrages from both sides in increasing number. For 
signs of who's winning keep your eye on reports of CBS color set orders. That's 
real test. 



SPONSOR 




No. 25 OF A SERIES 



Wilbert Robinson 
In Hits Per Game; 

WHEC 
In Rochester Radio 



10H0 TlMi 



WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 
Note WHEC's leadership morning, afternoon, evening: 



STATION 



STATION 



STATION 



STATION 



WHEC B 
MORNING 41.8 25.5 

8:00-12:00 Noon 
Monday through Fri. 

AFTERNOON 43.9 31.9 

12:00-6:00 P.M. 
Monday through Fri. 

EVENING 

6:00-10:30 P.M. 
Sunday through Sat. 



6.8 7.9 



6.8 11.8 



34.6 29.6 10.2 10.2 
MARCH — APRIL 1951 

LATEST BEFORE CLOSING TIME 



STATION 

E 

13.3 



2.8 
12.8 



STATION 

F 

4.0 



1.7 



Station 

Broadcasts 

till Sunset 

Only 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 





N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT- McKINNEY, Inc. New York, Chicago, LEE F. O'CONNELL CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco. 



16 JULY 1951 




The MIGHTY 

MONTGOMERY MARKET 



95TH MARKET 
IN THE U.S. 

Mighty Montgomery 
is the hub of one of 
the nation's top agri- 
cultural and indus- 
trial markets. 




GIANT AIRFORCE 
MILITARY BASE 

• Mighty Montgomery 
home of Maxwell 
Field, one of the 
largest Air Force cen- 
ters in the entire na- 
tion. 




OVER 600,000 
IN TRADING AREA 

• Mighty Montgomery 
dominates the rich 
surrounding trade 
area of 1 1 progres- 
sive and expanding 
counties. 




$134,000,000 
CITY RETAIL SALES 

• Mighty Montgomery 
had 1950 city retail 
sales alone that were 
$5,000,000 above 
those of the previous 
year. 




CAPITOL 
OF ALABAMA 

• Mighty Montgomery 
is a focal point of in- 
dustrial development 
both in Alabama 
and in the new 
South. 



Write, Wire or Phone for Availabilities! 



MUTUAL 

WJJJ 

Represented by 
Weed & Co. 



NBC 

WSFA 

Represented by 
Headley-Reed Co. 



MONTGOMERY 
NETWORK 
STATIONS 

ASSOCIATION 



ABC 

WAPX 

Represented by 
The Walker Co. 



CBS 

wcov 

Represented by 
The Taylor Co. 



VOL 5 NO. 15 
16 JULY 1951 

Contents 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

MEN, MONEY AND MOTIVES 

FALL TRENDS IN COMMERCIALS 

NEW AND RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR: HAROLD L. SCHAFER 

FALL 1951: MUCH MONEY, MANY 
PROBLEMS 

WHAT NATIONAL ADVERTISERS 



1 
10 
12 
17 
22 

29 



WILL DO THIS FALL 


32 


NETWORK RADIO 


43 


SPOT RADIO 


65 


RADIO BASICS 


107 


TV MAP FOR SPONSORS 


131 


SPOT TV 


137 


TV RESULTS 


146 


NETWORK TV 


149 


OVERALL 


163 


MR SPONSOR ASKS 


176 


TV DICTIONARY 


190 


EDITORIAL 


198 




Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.. 
combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Ofiicis: *>10 Madison Ave., New York 22, 
N. V Telephone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
101 K. Grand \'.< . Suite 205 Telephone: Superior 7-9863. 
West Coast Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Los Angeles. 
Telephone: Hillside 8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United States 
$8 a year, Canada and foreign S9. Single copies 50c. 
Printed in V. S. A. Address all correspondence to 519 
Xfadlson Avenue, New York 22. N. Y. Copyright 1951. 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn. Secretary 
Treasure) Elaine Couper Glenn, Managing Editor: 
Mih David Senior Editors: Erik n Arctander, Frank 
Eta i Charles Sinclair. Assistant Editors: Fred Birn- 
baum, Lila Lederman, Richard A Jackson. Art. Direc- 
tor: Howard Wechslei Vice-President -Advertising: 
Vorman Knight. Advertising Department: Edwin I). 

pei (W< tern Manager), George Weiss (Traveling 

Representative, Chicago Office), John A, Kovcnok (Pro- 
duction Managr), Edna Yergln, John McCormack. Vice- 
Presidenl Busines Manage) Bernard Piatt. Circula- 
tion Department: Evelyn Satz (Subscription Manager), 
Emily Cutillo, Josephine Vlllanti. Secretary to Pub- 
lishei Uigusta Sherman Office Manager: Olive Sherban. 



Madison 



AD-MANN NOW GOTTESMANN 

\\ hen our cop) of si'OissoK arrives, 
I hungril) read page after page, para- 
graph after paragraph, sentence after 
sentence . . . even ad after ad. I 
thought that there was nothing in any 
cop) that I could have missed. But lo 
and behold when our 4 June issue ar- 
rived I noted that there was something 
I have been missing issue after issue. 
That is our address. It must have been 
bv some oversight that you were not 
notified of our change of name. It is 
now the "Adolf F. Gottesmann Adver- 
tising Agency instead of "Ad-Mann 
Advertising Agency" . . . we are still 
incorporated. 

Oh yes. I would appreciate your 
sending, as quickly as available, "TV 
Dictionary/Handbook for Sponsors." 
Keep up the good work on your ex- 
ceptionally fine publication. 

Leonard Blake 

Director of Radio & Television 

Adolf F. Gottesmann Advertising 

Newark 



EXCUSE, PLEASE, MR. FOREMAN! 

I hope the misprint in the last para- 
graph of my pot pourri in which the 
word "underground"' got in instead of 
"undersigned" doesn't make me sound 
subversive. 

Robert L. Foreman 

Vice President 

BBDO 

New York 

• Honest, we didn't intend lo net Mr. Foreman 
in trouble with a Congressional investigation com- 
mittee. What he really wrote was : * P. 5. Anyone 
—film producer, agency or otherwise— who would 
like current TV copy reviewed by the undersigned, 
see that I pet a 1 6mm. print and we'll try to get 
around to it with dispatch." 



MORE "SPANISH" COMMENTS 

It is most unfortunate that credit 
for Procter & Gamble's success with 
Tide in the Lower Rio Grande Valley 
was credited to a Spanish hour on a 
Brownsville. Tex., station. Procter & 
Gamble s Tide has been using XEO, 
Matamoros-Brownsville, with a spot 
schedule since June. 1950, and recently 
took a similar schedule for Cheer. 

sponsor land Lever Brothers) 



should look into the Rio Grande Valle> 
situation more closel) to determine 
where successful results are obtained 
in Spanish. Procter & Gamble alread) 
knows. 

Robert N. Pinkerton 

Manager 

XEO-XEOR 

Brownsville, Tex. 



I would appreciate receiving a copy 
of the list indicating the location of 
Spanish radio stations in this country. 
It was mentioned in the 4 June issue 
of SPONSOR. 

Robert H. Rains 

Radio-TI Promotion Manager 

Universal-International Pictures 

Universal City, Cal. 



• A list of 165 Southwest 
Spanish language programs is 
scribers on request. 



tations 
vailablc 



nip 
llb- 



I want you to know that I thought 
it was a swell article on the Spanish 
markets in the 4 June issue of your 
fine publication. 

Unquestionably, this article will 
benefit our station as well as all sta- 
tions carrying Spanish programs, and 
will be most helpful to time buyers 
and media departments in properly 
evaluating this most worthwhile seg- 
ment audience. 

Your publication has done more 
than any other in the field in high- 
lighting the importance of specialized 
and segment groups and stations spe- 
cializing in same. 

Arthur H. Croghan 

President 

KOWL 

Santa Monica. Cal. 



WHAT PULLS EM IN? 

We are making an analysis of dif- 
ferent media in several markets in 
which our clients are interested. 

Have you published any articles in 
recent months on cost per listener to 
television and radio and cost per read- 
er on newspapers? If you have, I will 
appreciate your sending me the dales 
of issues in which these articles ap- 
peared. 

\im in i; G. Beck Jr. 
Account Executii e 
Lindsey and Co., Inc. 
Richmond 

• Reader Beck i- referred to the ARB1 studies 

(26 March SPONSOR) which show how r.,,li„ 
compares *ith newspapers in -- ;i 1 «- -- pull .it point- 
of-sale. Future tests will include I V - also. 



ONLY ONE 

Station-KMA 
Delivers the 

BIG 

Rural Midwest 
Market 



2,377,600 

prosperous midwestern- 
ers in 140 of America's 
most productive agricul- 
tural counties. 



A BIG Market 

Greater than the city 

Populations of 

• PHILADELPHIA or 

• DETROIT or 

• LOS ANCELES 




KMA 



SHENANDOAH, IOWA 

Represented by 
Avery-Knodel, Inc. 




Under Management of 

MAY BROADCASTING CO. 

Shenandoah, Iowa 



16 JULY 1951 



KPAC 

Sells v 

Texas 

Market 




. . . The Rich Beaumont-Port 
Arthur-Orange Metropolitan 
Tri-City Area 

234,200 Population 
$242,903,000 SSti 1 

(Source: 1950-51 Consumer Markets) 

Here is Texas' 5th Market, one of the wealthi- 
est in the world . . . the concentrated Beaumont- 
Port Arthur-Orange metropolitan areas. 

• the No. 1 oil refining area in the world 

• producing 1 out of every 10 barrels of oil 

• 2nd only to New York City in shipping 

tonnage. 

KPAC listeners earn big, better-than-average 
incomes. KPAC can sell this concentrated buying 
power for you with intensive, productive KPAC 
coverage . . . Plus KPAC's huge 1,353,200 popu- 
lated Regional Market . . . more thousands of 
KPAC listeners and more big sales volumes 
for you. 

HIGH HOOPERS ... 17 years of Listener 
Loyalty prove KPAC's salesability in a highly 
competitive radio market: 

Week-day morning, Monday thru Friday 21.8 

Week-day afternoon, Monday thru Friday 19.9 

Evening, Sunday thru Saturday 12.3 

Sunday afternoon 35. 4 

(Share of audience, latest Hooper.) 



Follow the Local Advertisers 

Local sponsors with first-hand knowledge 
of area choose KPAC. August Miller Hard- 
ware Co., sponsor of 7:45 a.m. News, with 
Joel Swanson reporting, gave just one men- 
tion of Chris-Craft Boat Kits to arrive soon, 
and was flooded with inquiries. Within 2 
days, had sales of $451.50. Estimates future 
sales of approximately $2,000 when stock 
arrives. Cost just $1050 for 3 announce- 
ments on 7:45 News, only one of which 
mentioned boat kits. 

CHECK TODAY, and select KPAC 
availabilities that can get your product 
really moving in Texas' 5th Market. 




5000 WATTS • MUTUAL 

John E. Pearson Co., National Representative* 



TOOT A TOOT 

May I toot your horn and extend 
our sincere gratitude for the wonderful 
magazine you circulate. And may I 
also state that of all the broadcasting 
magazines, sponsor ranks on top of 
our list! 

May I also toot our horn in the 
way of offering a promotion sugges- 
tion for any stations interested. An- 
nually, KAYL. in conjunction with a 
photographer, launches a child per- 
sonality contest. And to judge the con- 
test, we ask Capitol Records in Holly- 
wood to line up a judge, who this year 
was Tex Ritter. . . 

The contest proved (again) that ra- 
dio is a wonderful medium. We used 
ONLY radio promotion. No more 
than two announcements per day; no 
more than two programs per day. 

During a three-week period, we re- 
ceived 262 entries — quite a record. 
The first year, we received 154 entries; 
the second year, 203. 

Paul R. Benson 

Promotion Manager 

KAYL 

Storm Lake. la. 



"CRABS" AND COMPLIMENTS 

Do you know what's "wrong" with 
sponsor? You make writers out of 
readers! Your stuff hits so close to 
home, digs so deep, that with every is- 
sue I want to sit right down and write 
you either compliments or crabs. 
Mostly the former. This note is both. 

The "crab" is a minor one. In your 
excellent Mueller Macaroni story in 
a recent issue, you apparently didn't 
have the latest Worcester rating. Ac- 
tually, the 1950 Oct.-Nov. Pulse break- 
down gives WTAG at 12.9 at 8:00 a.m. 
— making us second in the list of Muel- 
ler stations rather than eighth. 

The real thing you are to be com- 
plimented on. though, is the terrific 
job you did on "How not: to buy 
radio time"' in that same issue. You 
brought out an important point when 
you warned against improper evalua- 
tion of BMB. But one very important 
point which was not brought out was 
ignoring the physical size of a county 
in relation to the distribution <>l its 
population. 

The conclusion that all 3,070 U.S. 
counties are the same size is as ridicu- 
lous as saying that all 48" states are 
alike. For instance, WTAG is located 



in Worcester County — a single county 
which is one-and-one-half times the 
size of the entire state of Rhode Is- 
land, with its five counties. 

Nearly two-thirds of Worcester 
County's population lives in 60 cities 
and towns outside of Worcester City. 
BMB divides our county into North 
and South County. Yet here is what 
happens when approximately 50% 
BMB coverage is used without consid- 
eration of physical size in relation to 
the population distribution. 

In the South County (which in- 
cludes Worcester City ) all Worcester 
stations are given about 50% or more. 
So the conclusion is that any of those 
stations serves the South County, and 
its 111.640 radio families. 

Here's what happens when you 
break down the actual situation: 

BMB, City of Worcester only 
Daytime: 56,450 radio families 

Station A 93% 

Station B 71% 

Station C 78% 

Station D 83% 

But look at South County, outside 
of Worcester City, where the other half 
of the audience is: 

BMB, South County, City of Worcester excluded 
Daytime: 55.190 radio families 

Station A 82% 

Station B 25% 

Station C 27'i 

Station D 13% 

From these figures, it is obvious that 
only one of those stations covers the 
audience in that BMB unit (South 
County including Worcester City)- — 
even though all stations show about 
50%> or more, BMB. 

Anyhow, "How not to buy radio 
time" was a good story. Keep them 
coming. 

Robert J. Brown 

Commercial Manager 

WTAG 

Worcester 



ON AGENCY RADIO PERSONNEL 

The existing pattern for hiring per- 
sonnel in advertising agencies was es- 
tablished long before the advent of ra- 
dio and television. Since newspapers, 
magazines, and billboards comprised 
the chief media, advertising agency em- 
plovers developed a hiring orientation 
dependent on them. In the main, the 
new employee's worth to the agency 
was regarded in terms wholly relative 
to the aforementioned advertising ve- 
hicles. Though, with the development 
of radio and television, agencies con- 
tinue to evaluate (misevaluate. really) 
prospective employees on the basis of 
pre-radio criteria. 



SPONSOR 



The advertising employee who is re- 
sponsible for the sales appeal of a 
newspaper or magazine ad is in no 
way accountable for the content of the 
rest of the page on which the ad ap- 
pears. The agency considered a jour- 
nalist or the writer of fiction a breed 
apart from a commercial copy writer, 
with separate and distinguishable tal- 
ents. Logically, the agency does not 
ordinarily expect to recruit its "crea- 
tive" advertising specialists from the 
writing staffs of newspapers and maga- 
zines. Advertising experience, not jour- 
nalistic or fiction-writing experience, is 
demanded. 

However, such a guiding parallel is 
not to be found in radio and television 
advertising. Wherein a newspaper ad 
adorns a sheet of newsprint quite in- 
dependently of whatever else happens 
to be on the same page, the familiar 
opening, middle, and closing radio 
commercials serve in a vastly different 
relationship to its proximate program 
material. In placing commercial copy, 
the agency cannot be responsible for 
the quality of the entire page. But in 
broadcasting, the entire program, in- 
cluding commercials, is the agency's 
responsibility. 

Now, who knows radio better than a 
radio man? There may be no room 
for a good newspaperman on the staff 
of an advertising agency, but a good 
radio man obviously represents a de- 
sirable asset. A member of the pro- 
gram department, in particular, always 
considers himself an advertiser; is de- 
veloped and nurtured in an advertising 
climate. He is constantly aware of the 
advertising appeal; sensitive to the 
tastes, desires, and habits of the listen- 
ing audience. 

Agencies would do well to staff their 
radio/TV departments with men and 
women who have matured in the broad- 
casting station. The larger national ad- 
vertising agencies already have made 
this discovery. Smaller establishments 
need not look to other advertising agen- 
cies for radio/TV staffers, but to the 
trained ranks in broadcasting stations. 
For some 20 years now, timebuying 
has become institutionalized into the 
ad agency, so it seems time that agen- 
cies stop hiring staffers under princi- 
ples adopted from the all-space buying 
age. 

Herman Gordon 
Philadelphia 

• The writer is continuity supervisor of a 
Philadelphia broadcast firm. 



THE FEELING IS 

MUTUAL 

IN PHILLY! 



that 




^ ^rolicli' 



Here's why-WIP's advertis- 
ers through the years have 

found that dollar for dollar, Philadelphia's Pioneer 

Voice is their best radio buy ... . 



frecau^e 



A 



^Prodi 



I 



roauceAi 

and listen to this ... in 
spite of a hot television 
market, WIP has increased its new business more 
than 18% for the first half of 1951 . . . 



because 



0$ 



^JW 



reduces: 



t 



whatever your P ^ ^ . . ^flV 
kn ov, v/e can d ^ 

and pr° ve Y 



PHILADELPHIA 

BASIC MUTUAL 

Represented Nationally 
by 

Edward Petry & Co. ^ 



5000 WATTS 
610 KC 



16 JULY 1951 



SELL THE HEART OF ARIZON 

OVER KOY PHOENIX, ARIZONA 



dvertisers with no time or money to waste have found KOY the direct 
»ute to the rich Arizona market whose hub is fast-growing Phoenix and 
le Salt River Valley. 

s exclusive representatives of KOY for the past twelve years, John 
lair & Company knows how KOY can sell and why. Here is a station 
tut makes wide-spread coverage count with a proven record of unusual 
ceptance. Arizona's pioneer radio outlet, KOY has been building its 
(Hitation for public service over 29 years. It is home-owned, home- 
terated, and an integral part of the community and all its affairs. It is 
ie only Arizona radio station that owns all of its facilities, including 
udio, office and transmitter properties. KOY gives non-directional cover- 
;e of 85% of the state's population with 5000 watts on 550 KC. 

des-minded management has converted KOY's listener loyalty into hi 
•ol radio business that has paid off for one advertiser after another. 
»ur John Blair man has all the facts on merchandising and selling 
surprisingly low cos/ over KOY. It will pay you to call him today. 



..;.„■,:■:-.■«*(<: 




KOY transmitter propert) and single 
tower, giving non-directional coverage 
ovei .",.', ,,[ Arizona's population with 

5000 watts on :,:,() KC. ,\ f> K\\ main 

transmitter and 1 K\\ standby, with 
auxiliar) power plant, are both Western 
Electric equipment of the latest design. 



r 




KOY studio building with recem $100,000 addi 

Studios and control equipmenl are the most moderd 

the State of Arizona and include three I igh-fidelitj r; 

1 nted Stancil-Hoffman tape recorders. Ml equir,. 

exceeds F.C.C. standards for high-fidelit) reproduc'i] 






HE JOHN BLAIR WAY 

OP SELLING RADIO STATION 




THE RAPIDLY- EXPANDING city 
bf Phoenix, Capital of Arizona, is sur- 
rounded by prosperous residential corn- 
unities and rich agricultural land. 



JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 
specializes in radio rep- 
resentation exclusively. 
Since we are entirely re- 
moved from any other op- 
eration or function, we 
are able to give the sta- 
tions we represent our 
full time and our full ef- 
forts ... as specialists in 
selling via spot radio. 




KOY'S management team, experts in three fields: left to right, John L. Hogg, President, 
Commercial Manager and a salesman of twenty-five year's experience, \lhcrt Johnson, 
Vice President, General Manager and the man behind KOY's splendid record ol public 
service. Jack Williams, Director and Secretarj with twenty-three war- it KOV behind 
his reputation as one of the outstanding program men in the radio industry. 




GEORGE GRAHAM, popular master 
of ceremonies for KOY audience shows 
and his morning "Disc Show", a hard- 
selling program and housewives' favorite. 




BILL LESTER'S afternoon "Recora 
Matinee" has i consistentlj loyal follow- 
ing of listeners and commercial sponsors. 




S COMPANY 





REPRESENTING LEADING RADIO STATIONS 



PAUL GRIBBEN, Km News Editor 
and radio veteran, keeps hi)\ ahead "I 
the field in news. His coverage ol the 
Legislature has won him widespread rec- 
ognition in high i n cles in i he S 





Ben Alexander 



"Watch and Win'— KPIX's 
telephone quiz game — is still 
urawing top mail response, which 
numbers about 12,000 monthly; and 
sponsor, Acme Breweries, reports that 
sales for their new Gold Label Beer are 
moving at a fast rate. 

Starring Ben Alex- 
ander, voted out- 
standing TV person- 
ality by Academy of 
Television Arts and 
Sciences, and his 
lovely wife, Lesley, 
"Watch and Win" is 
a unique telequiz, in 
which viewers' write- 
in cards are selected 
by Ben and Lesley 
for telephone calls 
. . . questions . . . 
and prizes! 
BASEBALL 

Biggest news to baseball fans is the 
fact that KPIX is now lensing the San 
Francisco Seals' Saturday afternoon 
home games. The diamond battles, which 
include a series of eight games, are un- 
der the direction of Sandy Spillman and 
Dave Kees, with Don Klein at mike side. 
KPIX's Saturday games are simulcast 
over KSFO! 

NARCOTIC SERIES 

The three week series on narcotics, recently 
featured on KPIX's "KMA 438", has been 
loudly acclaimed as an outstanding service to 
the community. 

Handled by Inspector John Kane and 
Lt. Alvin Nicolini, the programs, which 
were presented in cooperation with the 
San Francisco Police Department, cov- 
ered the entire subject of narcotics as a 
police problem and an ever-increasing 
menace to society. 

ADD AIRINGS: 

KSFO now features Robert Montgomery in 
"Freedom Is Our Business" for the S. F. 
School of Nursing three mornings a week. . . 
The Ethyl Corporation is sponsoring "Sport- 
scholar" on KPIX Wednesdays at 11:00 
P.M. . . 




Represented by Wm. G. Rambeou Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



i 
10 



Man is, or is supposed to be, a foresighted animal. Hence your 
foresighted adman at this mid-July turns from contemplation of 
sunburn, sand fleas, golf, mosquito bites, lastex hips, mint juleps, 
picnics, ponies, Gussie Moran's scalloped panties, and other fascina- 
tions of deepest summer to a calculated looking ahead to the "fall 
facts" relative to making a buck. The weighing in of the facts of 
any given fall grows in importance from July to July for a simple 
reason: there are more, always more, facts to consider. 

* * * 

Count back 10 years. That's approximately one-third the life-span 
of radio advertising. But it's counting back from the complexity of 
1951 to the simplicity of 1941. Then the industry was much more 
than will ever again be the case an industry of neighbors. One spon- 
sor knew another sponsor, one station operator knew his contem- 
poraries, the typical timebuyer called off most of the station sales 
directors by their first names. 

* * * 

Against advice but on the principle that there couldn't be too 
much competition in the country which invented anti-trust legisla- 
tion, the FCC began granting licenses like crazy. The radio station 
population of the U.S.A. grew from around 930 in 1941 to 2.400 in 
1951. In that fact alone, revolution was implicit. 

* * * 

The influx of new station operators, detached from and unfamiliar 
with radio history, would have changed things anyhow. But the war 
years were soft years, weakening the sales guts of sellers and buyers 
alike. Who may estimate the net enfeebling of drive and sales strat- 
egy induced by those easy war years when business came over the 
transom, when excess profit tax dollars were mistaken for genius and 
almost any time (or space) peddler cleaned his teeth in champagne? 

H= * * 

One more obvious observation. In 1941, television was more 
promise than threat. Allen B. DuMont had hardly moved out of his 
basement lab. Milton Berle was just a fresh comic who used his 
mother as an audience plant at Loew's State. 

* * * 

By June of last year, before Korea, something like "normal" com- 
petition had been restored in all advertising. Tough-mindedness was 
back in the saddle with consequences frequently unpleasant to the 
long-slocp wartime sales executives who still expected to solve all 
their problems each morning by opening mail and banking checks. 

* * * 

There were those who hoped the new militarv appropriation bil- 
lions would bring back three-hour luncheons in advertising. This 
has not worked out. A Garrison Economy, half at war, half at peace, 
has uncertainties absent in all-out war. Nor is the present excess 
profits lax situation so favorable as the former one. The militar) 
appropriations did give the national economy a big hypo. 

(Please turn to page C3) 

SPONSOR 



VOUR STATE ^ 

X H G r^*t 8MI PROGRAM Cl* 




PLAN NOW TO ATTEND 

Watch for the date and announcements 
from your State Broadcasters Association 

A TIMELY AND VALUABLE 

EXCHANGE OF THOUGHTS AND IDEAS 
ON EVERY IMPORTANT PHASE 

OF PROGRAMMING BY SPECIALISTS 

BASED UPON SUCCESSFUL OPERATIONS 
AND PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE 



Each Clinic comes loaded with shirt-sleeve 
talks by recognized experts in their held; 
down-to-earth discussions of pro- 
gramming problems; and such phases 
of broadcasting as modern uses 
of news and music; Station 
public relations; how to make 
the most of the tools of 
your trade; what management 
expects from its program 
department; handling of rural 
and farm programs; importance 
of the disc jockey; small 
station operations; your music 
library: copyright matters 
and many Other pertinent topics. 

"Better Programming Requires More Thought Not More Dollars" 

BROADCAST MUSIC, Inc. 

580 FIFTH AVENUE • NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD • TORONTO . MONTREAL 



16 JULY 1951 



11 




:-^af% 




M 




ill 




There's no problem for 
Bill Joyce of the Katz Chicago 
office when it comes to 
boosting WGBS. He points to 
the record — that shows the 
WGBS morning audience 40% 
ahead, afternoon audience 
48% ahead of the nearest 
competition. That means more 
for your money on WGBS 
than any other Miami area 
station. 



15 



15 



From the desk 
of BILL JOYCE: 

You're seeing double when you 
look at the Miami market to- 
day. For in the last five years, 
total radio homes have doubled. 
So has the WGBS share of 
audience. For your share of this 
big market, put your money 
and your message) where 
most people listen. 



\ 




Fall Trends in 
Radio / TV Coiiimercials 



(»./ BOB loitniw 



MIAMI FLORIDA 



For this special issue. I have been 
asked to write about commercial trends 
in radio and television for the fall sea- 
son. I think I'll play it cagey by ad- 
mitting that judging a trend in televi- 
sion when vou're immersed in the me- 
dium is akin to looking for a birth- 
mark on the engineers nose when the 
locomotive is bearing down on you. 
Radio is somewhat easier in that its 
trends are gentler — except, of course, 
those caused by the violence of TV. 

In the latter category. I'd say there 
is a definite trend in radio toward com- 
mercial simplicity. This is the result 
of several definite television influences. 
The first is the bare fact that there is 
a thing called television. Psychologi- 
cally, no one who works in TV is going 
to kill himself to come up with a great 
new radio technique. If his television 
innovation (i.e. Be Happy — Go Lucky) 
works in radio, swell! But I can't be- 
lieve that a radio copy theme or gim- 
mick which couldn't be televised would 
arouse much of a ripple in the pool. 

Second, as I mentioned last month, 
television has taught us the power of 
the human personality; it has re-em- 
phasized the persuasiveness of the 
skilled salesman. So we shall see (hear, 
that is) more straightforward selling 
in radio, and rightly so. 

Third, there is the fact that televi- 
sion is stealing audiences from radio. 
Although radio prices for both time 
and talent have come down, further 
economy is ahead. Hence fewer peo- 
ple are going to use the Boston Sym- 
phony for their jingle — or even an 
octet . . .another reason for the trend 
to simplicity. 

Now lest the aforementioned leads 
you to the conclusion I'm convinced 
that the radio copy of tomorrow is go- 
in"; to suffer a lot and thus become less 



effective, let me state that I believe the 
contrary is true. 

I think radio selling is going to get 
smarter! More effective! More adver- 
tisers will turn to the disk jockeys and 
participating charmers and those per- 
sonalities ("stars") who aren't above 
delivering their sponsors commercials. 
This can only lead to stronger copy— 
whether it's placed in a fringe time- 




Kefauver probe showed power of personality 

spot on an independent station or in a 
fat network slot. In other words, 
there'll be more grassroots radio on the 
immediate horizon which is sure to 
mean more sales. Radio still is a fab- 
ulously effective mass medium. 

As to copy trends in television, well 
—I've got a lot of beliefs. In the first 
place I think there might well be a 
great deal less animation — for two rea- 
sons. Cost is the obvious one — but, 
more important, the great rush to be 
funny is about over. In other words, 
I think there may be less mis-use of 
animation. Where a product wants 
memory value, intrigue, impact of a 
sort — where lack of reality and believ- 
ability won't impair the sales story— 
there you'll get your clever animation. 
But not everybody will whip into 
whimsy before analysing what impres- 
sion he should be trying to make. 

I think there yvill be more live copy 
on live television shoyvs. Film has im- 
proved tremendously. But its cost, its 



12 



SPONSOR 



time-factor and its inflexibility coupled 
with the development of more good tel- 
evision announcers will lead us to do 
more live show commercials. 

A year ago I wrote an article stat- 
ing that Dick Stark was just about the 
only real top-notch TV announcer I'd 
run into. Today I know a dozen fine 
ones — and I'm sure most of the folks 
in television feel the same way I thank 
goodness! ) . 

I think camera work will be more di- 
rect in the presentation of this copy. 
That is there will be less button-push- 
ing, fewer unnecessary dollies, pans, 
dissolves. We've seen a Senator Ke- 
fauver fascinate us without a change 
of shot for five full minutes and a Mr. 
Costello's hands hold us spellbound for 
just as long. Yes, we're learning to 
leave things alone. 

As for film, its quality is already 
a thousand per cent better, and it will 
continue to improve. Everybody — the 
film makers, agencies, and advertisers 
alike have learned volumes about film- 
making for television. Lighting is bet- 
ter, acting has improved, sets are 
sounder and writing is way up. Then, 
too, television receivers have bigger 
screens so the monotony of the close- 
ups we were forced into at first can 
now be relieved. Details can be seen 
to be appreciated. And, of course, 
depth will add interest. 

Every day will see fewer shaking an- 
nouncers and vacant-eyed actresses 
whether on film or live. We 11 see more 
poise and assurance. And, as in live 
copy, fewer camera effects. The barn 
door and flip-wipes will be reserved 
for the places where the\ actually ad- 
vance and enhance the thought. The 
cut and the dissolve will be our most- 
used transitions. 

And finally I believe I here, I'm 
highly prejudiced, to be sure I we will 
see the best advertising that has yet 
been devised in any medium. We've 
gotten wise to this new thing that gives 
us both sight and sound; at least a lot 
wiser than we were. So I think we're 
going to set the ad-business on its ear. 
Despite what are said to be prohibitive 
costs, I believe selling via television is 
well on its way to proving itself a bo- 
nanza. Even poor commercial copy 
works. Good copy will do the impos- 
sible. Which is why I think we'll be 
seeing a great deal of really good com- 
mercializing on television in the sea- 
son ahead. * • • 



THIS IS NO JEREMIAD, BUT . 



What's the Matter 
With Radio? 



First, we don't agree that it's television. T\ isn't ^"ing to stop newspapers, 
magazines, books — and certainly not radio. 

Next, nothing much that radio itself cannot remedy. 

Third, the nation needs the vast communications, entertainment and informa- 
tion system which has been woven into the fabric of our lives. 

BUT the things that are hurting radio are numerous and varied, and every 
segment of the industry that has been built up on it needs to do some soul- 
searching. 

We have over-commercialized radio, with hitch-hiker-, cow-catchers, spots 
and double spots and maybe snow-plows, and cabooses. Instead of giving it a 
chance to do the selling job it can do, arent we treating the audience like a 
crowd at a side show, and yelling louder — and longer.'' 

If that's good advertising, which we doubt, it isn't g I radio. Of course 

such methods build sales resistance. 

So, to get their money's worth, one segment of the industry forces rate reduc- 
tions, which are uneconomical and unsound for a medium which still is as good a 
buy, if not better than any. at the price. Compare the stability of radio rates 
and returns with the increased costs of every other medium of advertising. 

Understand that we are not talking exclusively about network operations; 
we refer, also, to the slipping that has been going on in individual station- i 
case of the industry slipping on something more than a banana peel. 

And what are receiver manufacturers doing to help radio? Recognizing that 
there are exceptions to generalizations, it nevertheless is a fact that the indus- 
try as a whole is making it harder for the average listener to tune in bis favor- 
ite station or stations than ever before. 

With the over-crowded condition of the AM broadcast band, stations are 
jammed closer together than ever before. At the same time radio dials are 
pushed together so that you can tune only by guess and by gosh. 

We used to have electronic and other aids to tuning. Whither have they 
gone? Haven't we, in a suicidal price-war, cut the quality of the receivers 
in these respects to the point where they no longer deliver the convenience to 
which the listeners are entitled? 

If these same conditions prevail, as efforts are made to establish FM, that 
medium never will get out of swaddling clothes. If the automobile manufac- 
turers followed the same kind of policy we today would have poorer cars in- 
stead of better; rather, by raising the quality and standards, the auto industry 
has earned and commanded higher prices. 

This is not a one-man nor a one-station program to reform the industry; we 
scarcely have time enough to run our own business in a manner to minimize 
some of the conditions we call to your attention. We don't pretend to be blame- 
less, but we are taking a sharp look t<. see that this -elf-criticism is put to work 
in our own back yard. 

And we hope that --< >m>- or many of those having a great interest — and the 
advertisers surely do by reason of their vast investment in the medium over the 
years — will do some real skull practice. We hope all will decide to do some- 
thing about it individually and so far as conditions permit collectively. 

There is no benefit to anyone, least of all the advertiser, in down-grading a 
medium of advertising which he needs and which in our judgment will be 
used by many for long year- to come. 



\. 11. 



KIRCHHOFER, Vice President 

WBKV Inc. 



P.S. lint isn't tins the time to stop .similar practices in Tl 

wmm 

NBC BASIC • BUFFALO 



16 JULY 1951 



13 



Penetrate ALL of America's! 





n n 



_j~\ 



. shopping cente 



WFIL BLANKETS 

PHILADELPHIA... 

For blanket coverage in Philadelphia— city of two million — 
schedule WFIL. WFIL regularly reaches four-fifths of all the city's 
radio families . . . 451,260 homes where WFIL is a family buying 
guide. And WFIL is still growing. It's the only Philadelphia 
network station to show both day and night audience gains in 
BMB's latest survey . . . 18.5% more families (day) and 16.1% 
more families (night). You can't pass up Philadelphia, capital 
of America's 3rd Market . . . you can't pass up WFIL, first on the 
dial in Philadelphia. 



...BLANKETS THE WHOLE 
14-COUNTY MARKET 

Don't ignore any of the 14-County Philadelphia Retail Trading 
Area. Here is a zone of more than 4,400,000 people. Here, in more 
than two-thirds of the radio homes, 769,550 families consistently 
tune WFIL. In this rich market area WFIL's signal penetration is 
strongest . . . you reach all of the 147 "home markets" outside 
city limits where a majority of the area's prosperous population 
lives and buys. And WFIL takes you to a huge bonus area beyond 
the 14 counties. Total coverage: 6,800,000 people. To reach these 
customers schedule WFIL. 



rd Market 




or millions ! 





ELMER H. WENE, Vineland poul- 
tryman — The head of Wene Chicks 
and his family typify WFIL- 
adelphia's 32,567 farm households 
with buying power 98 per cent 
above average. He is a WFIL fan. 



A. O. SCHAEFER, Philadelphia 
steel maker — As Vice-President of 
The Midvale Company, he helps 
pay wages and salaries totaling 
$1,812,770,000 to workers in WFIL- 
adelphia's 8,566 industrial plants. 



KATHRYN L. BATCHLER, Glass- 
boro housewife — Like so many of 
the 2'/2 million women over 21 in 
WFIL-adelphia, Mrs. Batchler listens 
long and hard before she buys . . . 
and she listens regularly to WFIL. 




SIDNEY THAI, Chester grocer— 
4,400,000 people in this hungry 14- 
County market eat groceries worrh 
more than $1 billion a year. Mr. 
Thai's Edgemont Beef Company is 
one of 460 food stores in Chester. 



RAYMOND R. BEHRMAN, 

Phoenixville appliance dealer — 
Dealers like Behrman and Wiess 
sell $198,872,000 worth of house- 
hold goods a year in WFIL-adelphia. 
He is a regular WFIL listener. 







more dials are turning to . . . 
more dollars are turning to . . . 



We're not going 
into a long song and dance 
on "why WHDH is Boston's 
most productive radio station 
...figures don't lie, and here 
are some honeys! 



rr 



PULSE OF BOSTON RATINGS January through April, 1947 vs. 1951 



YEAR 

1947 



1951 



1.75 



3.43 



9:35-10:00 

2.07 



5.17 



2.83 



4.60 



2.74 



4.03 



2.44 



5.41 



2.25 



4.53 



8:00-10:30 

1.77 



2.78 



10:30-12Md 

1.07 



1.99 



COST PER THOUSAND PER ONE-MINUTE SPOT 



1947 



1951 



$1.14 



$ .59 



$ .97 



$ .45 



$ .99 



$ .59 



$ .73 



$ .50 



$ .82 



$ .56 



$1.11 



$ .60 



$1.41 



$ .79 



$1.87 



$ .74 



PERCENTAGE INCREASE IN 

NATIONAL SPOT BILLING, 

1947 vs. 1950 



304.8% 



*FOR FURTHER DETAILS SEE YOUR JOHN BLAIR MAN 




B> *- 



BOB CLAYTON 




CHRIS EVANS 



the Boston station with the "winning 
personalities" 

50,000 WATTS • 850 ON THE DIAL 



BOB DELANEY 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR 8. CO. 



WHDH 



RAY DOREY /*"V 

?! * 

FRED B. COLE 




JOHN DAY 






CURT GOWDY 



KEN & CAROLINE 



16 



SPONSOR 



Neiv and renew 



I. New on Television Networks 



16 JULY 1951 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Home Products 
Hazel Bishop Inc 

Cluett, Peabody & Co 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 
Congoleum-Nairn Inc 

Cory Corp 

General Electric Co 

General Electric Co 

General Foods Corp 

Jacques Kreisler Mfg Corp 

Lambert Pharmacal Co 

Mennen Co 

National Products Corp 

Packard Motor Car Co 

Pearson Pharmacal Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 

Ronson Art Metal Works 

Inc 
Schick Inc 



Blow 


CBS-TV 


47 


Raymond Spector 


NBC-TV 


55 


Young & Itul. i. .n.i 


ABC -TV 


39 


Sherman & Marquette 


CBS-TV 


32 


McCann-Eriekson 


NBC-TV 




Daneer- Fitzgerald- 


ABC-TV 


39 


Sample 






Young & KhI.h ..... 


CBS-TV 


25 


Y'oung & It ul.i. ..... 


CBS-TV 


49 


^ oung & Rubicam 


NBC-TV 




Hirshon-Garfield 


ABC-TV 


17 


Lambert & Feasley 


CBS-TV 


15 


Duane Jones 


DuMont 


25 


Marfree 


DuMont 




Young & It ul.i. ..... 


ABC -TV 


39 


Harry B. Cohen 


CBS-TV 


35 


Blow 


CBS-TV 


61 


Benton & Bowles 


NBC-TV 


SO 


Grey 


CBS-TV 


20 


Kudner 


CBS-TV 


38 



Unnamed; M-F 12:15-30 pm; 24 Sep; 52 wks 
Freddy Martin and his Orchestra; Th 10-10:30 

pm; 12 Jul; 7 wks 
Don Ameche's Musical Playhouse; alt Th 9-10 

pm ; 5 Jul ; 26 wks 
Unnamed; W 9-9:30 pm; 4 Jul; 52 wks 
Kate Smith; alt half hour W 8-9 pm; 19 Sep; 

52 wks 
Don Ameche's Musical Playhouse; T, Th 12:45- 

1 pm; 2 Oct; 52 wks 
Garry Moore Show; M, W, F 1 :30-45 pm; 17 

Sep; 52 wks 
General Electric Guest House; Sun 9-10 pm; 

1 Jul; 9 wks 
Young Mr. Buttons; Sun 7:30-8 pm; 26 Aug; 

52 wks 
Tales of Tomorrow; alt F 9:30-10 pm ; 3 Aug; 

52 wks 
So You Want To Lead a Band; Sat 7-7:30 pm ; 

28 Jul; 26 wks 
Twenty Questions; F 8-8:30 pm ; 6 Jul; 52 wks 
What Makes TV Tick?; T 11-11:15 pm ; 3 Jul; 

52 wks 
Don Ameche's Musical Playhouse; alt Th 9-10 

pm ; 5 Jul; 26 wks 
Unnamed; F 10:30-11 pm; 20 Sep; 52 wks 
Unnamed; M-F 12:30-45 pm ; 3 Sep; 43 wks 
Red Skelton; Sun 10-10:30 pm; 30 Sep; 52 

wks 
Unnamed; Sun 6:30-7 pm ; 29 Jul; 52 wks 

Unnamed; T 9-9:30 pm; 4 Sep; 52 wks 



2. Renewed on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Chesebrough Mfg Co 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 

Pabst Sales Co 

Pillsbury Mills Inc 

Radio Corporation of 

America 
Speidel Corp 
United States Tobacco Co 



Cayton 


NBC-TV 


32 


Sherman & Marquette 


NBC-TV 


60 


Warwick & Legler 


CBS-TV 


59 


Leo Burnett 


CBS-TV 


58 


J. Walter Thompson 


NBC-TV 


57 


SSCB 


NBC-TV 


46 


Kudner 


NBC-TV 


61 



Greatest Fights of the Century; F 10:45-11 pm; 

6 Jul; 52 wks 
Colgate Comedy Hour; Sun 8-9 pm; 2 Sep; 44 

wks 
Boxing Bouts; W 10 pm-conclusion ; 26 Sep; 

Arthur Godfrey & His Friends; alt W 8-8:30 

pm; 4 Jul; 52 wks 
Kukla, Fran & Ollie; M 7-7:30 pm ; 27 Aug; 

13 wks 
Speidel Show; M 8-8:30 pm; 17 Sep; 15 wks 
Martin Kane Private Eye; Th 10-10:30 pm ; 30 

Aug; 52 wks 



3. Station Representation Changes 



STATION 



AFFILIATION 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



KOAT, Albuquerque, N. M. 
KOTV, Tulsa 

KRSN, Los Alamos, N. M. 
KTRC, Santa Fe, N. M. 
WKAT, Miami Beach 
WMAL, Washington, D. C. 
WMAL-TV, Washington, D. C. 
Willi Miami 



Independent 

ABC, NBC, CBS, DuMont 

Independent 

Independent 

MBS 

ABC 

ABC 

Independent 



Adam J. Young Jr, N.Y. 
Edward Petry & Co, N.Y. 
Adam J. Young Jr, N.Y. 
Adam J. Young Jr. N.Y. 
Ra-Tel Representatives, N.Y'. 
Katz Agency, N.Y. 
Katz Agency, N. Y. 
Adam J. Young Jr, N.Y. 



4. New and Renewed Spot Television 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET OR STATION 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Cigarette & 

Cigar Co 
American Cigarette & 

Cigar Co 
American Home Foods 

Inc 
American Maize Products 

Co 



SSCB 

SSCB 

Ted Bates 

Kenvon & Eckhardt 



WBZ-TV, Boston 
WNBW, Wash. 
WBZ-TV, Boston 
WNBT, N. Y. 



I -.nil. anncmt; 2 Jul; 13 wks (r) 
I ....... anncmt; 3 Jul; 13 wks (r) 

20-sec stn break; 6 Jul; 13 wks (r) 
I -mill anncmt; 6 Jul; 13 wks (r) 



• In next issue: New and Renewed on Networks, New National Spot Radio Business, National 
Broadcast Sales Executive Changes, Sponsor Personnel Changes, New Agency Appointments 




Numbers after names 
refer to category in 
New and Renew: 

S. Armstrong (5) 

C. F. Bell (5) 

E. C. Bradley (5) 

Harry W. Frier (5) 

C. F. Gannon (5) 



\«'ir and Renew 16 July 1951 




4. New and Renewed Spot Television (Continued) 







Numbers after names 
refer to category in 
New and Renew: 



H. G. Wolsey 
John C. Gillis 
D. McVickar 
J. K. Martindale 
H. G. Sawyer 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET OR STATION 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Atlantis Sales Corp 
I.' m ii Watch Co 
Best I I- Ine 

Borden Co 

Boi il. n Co 

II. m.I, n Co 

Brown & Williamson 

Tobacco Corp 
Bulova Watch Co Inc 
Continental Oil Co 
Eversharp lnc 
John F. Jelke Co 
Kellogg Co 
Minute Maid Corp 
New York Telephone Co 
Norwich Pharmacal Co 
Pearson Pharmacal Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 
Procter & Canihlc Co 
Bonson Art Metal Works 

Ine 
Standard Brands Ine 
Sunshine Biscuits Inc 
United Air Lines 



J. Walter Thompson 
J. D. Tarcher 
Benton & Bowles 

Young & Ruhicam 
Young & Ruhicam 
Doherty. Clifford & 

Shenfield 
Ted Bates 



WCAU-TV, Phila. 
WRGB, Schen. 
WNBT, N. Y„ and 

1 other stn 
WNBW, Wash. 
WNBT, N. Y. 
KTSL. Hlvwd. 

WTOP-TV, Wash. 



Blow 




WBTV, Charlotte 


20-see 


Geycr, Newell & 


Ganger 


KSL-TV, Salt Lake 


1-niin 


Biow 




WTOP-TV, Wash. 


1 ii. in 


BBDO 




WNBK, Cleve. 


20-see 


Kenvon & Eckh 


ir.ll 


WCAU-TV, Phila. 


1 null 


Ted Bates 




WCBS-TV, N. Y. 


20-see 


BBDO 




WCBS-TV, N.Y. 


1 -min 


Benton & Bowles 


WNBQ, Chi. 


20-see 


Harry B. Cohen 




WTOP-TV, Wash. 


20-scc 


Biow 




WCBS-TV, N. Y. 


1 -in in 


Conipton 




WPTZ, Phila. 


20-see 


Grey 




WBZ-TV, Boston 


20-see 


Conipton 




WPTZ. Phila. 


20-see 


Cunningham & 


Walsh 


WNBT, N. Y. 


20-sec 


N. W. Ayer 




WNBQ. Chi. 


20-see 



20-sec annemt; 1-min panic; 3 Jul; 13 wks (n) 
20-sec stn break; 2 Jul; 52 wks <r) 
1-min partic; 2 Jul; 13 wks (r) 

20-sec stn break; 1 Jul; 52 wks (r) 
20-sec stn break: 2 Jul; 52 wks (r) 
20-sec annemt; 6 Jul; 52 wks (r) 

20-sec, 8 sec annemt; 1 Jul; 52 wks (r) 



annemt; 21 Jul; 52 wks (r) 
annemt: 1 Jul; 29 wks (n) 
annemt; I Jul; 52 wks (r) 
stn break; 8 Jul; 13 wks (r) 
partie; 23 Jul; 26 wks (n) 
annemt: 11 Jul; 13 wks (n) 
partic; 3 Jul; 13 wks (n) 
stn break; 2 Jul; 3 wks (r) 
annemt; 1 Jul; 52 wks (n) 
partic; Jul; 52 wks (r) 
stn break; 19 Jul; 52 wks (r) 
stn break; 7 Jul; 26 wks (r) 



20-sec stn break; 7 Jul; 52 wks (r) 

20-sec stn break; 2 Jul; 13 wks (r) 

break; 3 Jul; 13 wks (r) 



5. Advertising Agencg Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Spencer Armstrong 

John II. Battison 

C. Frederick Bell 
Leon a Bowman 
Everett C. Bradley 
B. E. Burrell 
M. S. Claire 
David J. Cook 
Hal Falvey 
Richard B. Fansler 
Harry W. Frier 
Charles F. Cannon 

John C. Gillis 
Lawrence Boles Hicks 
Glenn Holder 

William G. Jorgenson 
Monty Mann 
James K. Martindale 
Donald McVickar 

W. Robert Mitchell 
Hal E. Moore 
Edward W. Murtfeldt 
Holcombe Parkes 

John A. Pierce 

Lester H. Ploetz 
Terry Quimhy 
Raymond F. Ruff ley 

Howard G. Sawyer 
Robert Sawyer 
Sachiko Tasaka 
HcImt G. Wolsey 



Opinion Leaders of America, N.Y.. dir 

Tele-Tech Magazine, N.Y., assoc editor 

Duane Jones, N.Y., vp 

Sterling, N. Y., acct exec 

Biow, N.Y., vp 

Sutherland- Abbott, Boston, acct exec 

WMCA, N.Y. 

McCann-Erickson, S.F., acet exec 

Fuller & Smith & Ross, Chi., acct exec 

WMDN, Midland. Mich.. prt»g dir 

Foote, Cone & Belding, N.Y., acct exec 

Benton & Bowles, N.Y., vp, dir pub rel 

H. W. Kastor & Sons, Chi., exec 
Lawrence Boles Hicks, N.Y., prcs 
McCann-Erickson, N.Y., marketing. 

research dir 
C.I.T. Corp. N.Y., industrial div adv mgr 
Glenn, Dallas, \\* 
William Esty. NY., vp 
Anderson. Smith & Cairns, Montreal, acct 

exec 
Lawrence Boles Hicks, N.Y.. vp 
WKOX, Framing ham. Mass., prog dir 
Benton & Bowles, N.Y.. acct exec 
Apex Film Corp., N.Y.. exec vp 
Tea Association. N.Y.. gen mgr 
Wallacc-Ferry-Hanly. Chi., acct exec 
Lawrence Boles Hicks, N.Y., copy chief 
Kenvon & Eckhardt, N.Y., acct research dir 

James Thomas Chirurg, N.Y., copy dir 
TV adv film work 

Lawrence Boles Hicks, N.Y., timehuyer 
KSL, Salt Lake, script writer 



Armstrong, Gannon & Assoc, N.Y.. partner (new 

firm, 280 Madison Ave) 
Dancer-Fit zgerald-Sample, N.Y., head of tv I 

prod 
I ...... .. & Mitchell, N.Y.. vp 

Same, exec vp 

Benton & Bowles, N.Y., vp 

Kctchum, Macleod & Grove, Pittsb., acct exec 

Raven, N.Y., radio dir 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-MacDougall, S.F., gen mgr 

Tim Morrow, Chi., first vp 

Mel drum & Few smith, Cleve., acct exec 

Same, vp 

Armstrong. Gannon & Assoc, N.Y.. partner (new 

firm. 280 Madison Ave) 
Same, dir research, marketing 
Same, board chairman 
J. D. Tarcher, N.Y., marketing, research dir 

Rea, Fuller & Co, N.Y., acct exec 

Lowe Runkle, Oklahoma City, vp 

Dancer- Fit zgerald-Sample, N.Y., vp, copy exec 

Same, vp (McVickar in N.Y. office) 

Same, exec vp, board dir 

Dickerman, N.Y., acct exec 

Same, vp 

Benton & Bowles, N.Y., vp, dir pub rel 

Kciiyon o» Eckhardt. N.Y., merchandising exec 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

I) ancrr- Fit zgerald-Sample, N.Y., research dept 

project dir 
Same, plans, marketing vp 

Kcnyon & Eckhardt, N.Y., radio-tv supervisor 
Same, hoard dir 
Gillham, Salt Lake, radio-tv exec 



6. J\etv Stations on Air 



STATION 



FREOUENCY 



WATTAGE 



OPENING DATE 



MANAGEMENT 



WGSM, Huntington, I. I. 



1 A up 



E. J. 1 ii .■ . i ■!.! 



7. J%etv iVeftcorfc lit 'illations 



STATION 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



KATY, San Luis Obispo, Cal. 
WNXT, Portsmouth, O. 
VPROV, WROV-FM, Roanoke 



Independent 
Independent 
MBS 



ABC 
ABC 
HBS-ABC 



J\£.Z 

W ¥ %f0 W^r \H THE FIVE POINT SYSTEM OF PROGRAMMING EVALUATION — 

IN IOWA, WHO IS THE PREFERRED 
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM STATION 



WHO 

+ /©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



FREE & PETERS, INC. 

National Representatives 




One of the twentieth century's most dramatic developments is 
the sudden emergence of the modern farmer and the modern 
farm family. Freed from impassable roads and stifling isolation, 
the average Iowa farm household is now more progressive and 
more prosperous than the average American household. 

Radio has played an enormous part in this transformation. It 
has helped teach and "sell" our people new ideas of every sort 
— economic, cultural, social. In 1950, Iowa listeners were asked 
to appraise the jobs being done by radio and by schools. The 
following chart (from the 1950 Iowa Radio Audience Survey) 
tells the story: 



ADULT APPRAISAL OF SCHOOLS AND RADIO 

(An Iowa Radio Audience Survey Study) , 

Figures are weighted percentages of all questioned in radio-equipped homes 



n this area they are doing: 


11.4% 


13.2% 


107% 


12.2% 




59.5 


69.2 


60.1 


70.9 




12.3 


13.2 


15.0 


13.0 




1.2 , 


1.0 


1.3 


1.5 




15.6 


3.4 


12.9 


2.4 



^Figures nave been weighted to gire correct influence 
to women and to men in urban, village and farm homes. 



Year in, year out, Station WHO devotes a very sizable part of 
all its programming to Educational Programs. In 1946, WHO 
conceived and pioneered the Plowing Matches and Soil Con- 
servation Days which have swept the nation ever since, and 
have taught millions of farmers "how to do" the kind of 
terracing, draining, plowing, etc. that improves farm lands, 
produces record crops. 

In 1941 WHO inaugurated the annual Master Swine Producer 
Project which has helped ever since to make Iowa the nation's 
top hog-producing state (20% of the U.S. total). 

In 1946, '47, '48 and '49, WHO won National Safety Council 
Awards for promoting Farm Safety. In recent years we have won 
two Distinguished Service Awards from the National Board of 
Fire Underwriters for our spectacular promotion of Fire Safety. 
In 1940, we inaugurated the Annual National Radio Corn I <>- 
tival, which has unquestionably contributed to the nations 
vastly-increased corn production. All these and many other 
Public Education projects are sponsored . . . by WHO alone! 

This is Point Five in the Five Point System of Programming 
Evaluation, which helps explain WHO's outstanding position 
as a public facility and as an advertising medium, in Iowa Plus. 
We suggest your consideration of this and the other four points 
as vital factors in time-buying. 



16 JULY 1951 



19 



Font Border fo Borcferand C&ast to Crae 



L. - ' 



BUILDING AND LOAN 



• FORWARD AMERICA — Home Builders & 

Loan Assoc. & Globe Homestead, New 
Orleans, La. 

• LYN MURRAY SHOW Hazleton Savings * 
Loan Company, Hazleton, Pa. 

• RAY BLOCH SHOW — Zanesvllle Federal 
Savings & Loan, Zanesvllle, Ohio 

• FORWARD AMERICA - Bartlett Mortgage 
Co., St. Joseph, Mo. 

. . . and hundreds morel 



SHOE STOR 



• DAVID ROSE SHOW - Esmonds Shoes, 
Connersvllle, Ind. 

• HOMEMAKER HARMONIES— Bakers Shoe 
Stores. Ontario, Oregon. 

• RAY BLOCH PRESENTS — Johnson Shoe 
Mlg. Co., Manchester, N. H. 

• LYN MURRAY SHOW Rltchles Shoe Store. 
Reglna, Sask , Canada. 

• WEATHER JINGLES Weatherblrd Shoe 
Dealer, Cedar City, Utah 

. . . and hundreds morel 



FARM EQUIPME 



• DICK NAYMES SHOW - 
Harvester Co., Lawrence, 

• STEAMBOAT JAMBOREE Dli 
Evans, Ltd., Nanalmo, B.C , 

• FARM PROGRAM SIGNATURE 
Farm Equipment, Statesvllle, N 

• FORWARD AMERICA North DM 
Elevator Co., Grand Fork, N D 
. . . and hundreds i 



• STEAMBOAT JAMBOREE -Trevellyan Bulck 
Company, St. Louis, Mo 

• FORWARO AMERICA Keystone Motor Com- 
pany, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

• FREEDOM IS OUR BUSINESS Earl Hayes 
Chevrolet Co., Dallas, Texas. 

• EDDY HOWARD SHOW Dlnsmore Chevro- 
let Sales, Havre de Grace. Md. 

. . . and hundreds morel 



• GIFT OCCASION CAMPAIGN O'Connor 
Drug Co., North Platte, Nebr. 

• STEAMBOAT JAMBOREE— Henry Levlnger 
Retail Drug Store. Baker, Oregon. 

• THREE SUNS Badgers Drug Store, Sara- 
sota, Fla. 

• CHAPEL BY THE SIDE OF THE ROAD 
Richard's Drug Company, Pampa, Te 

. . . and hundreds m< 



• FATHER'S DAY CAMPAIGN De 
ing Co., Chattanooga, Ten*. 

• SONGS OF OUR TIMES- Morse 
Shop, Eugene, Oregon. 

• STEAMBOAT JAMBOREE Ham 
Shop, Waterbury, Vermont. 

• MEN'S CLOTHING Stanley's CK 
ramento, Calif 

. . and hundret 




• DICK HAYMES SHOW— Bear's Dept. Store, 
York, Pa. 

• FREEOOM IS OUR BUSINESS — Collins 
Bros. Dept. Store, Marlon, Va. 

• FORWARD AMERICA -Lane-Bryant Dept. 
Store, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

• HOMEMAKER HARMONIES— Sears Roebuck 
& Co., New Brunswick, N. J. 

• 6IFT OCCASION JINGLES — Millers Oept. 
Store, Olympia, Washington. 

. . . and hundreds morel 



• FORWARD AMERICA - Citizen's State 
Bank, Houston, Texas. 

• FREEDOM IS OUR BUSINESS — Ulster- 
County Savings Institution, Kingston, 
N. Y. 

• WEATHER JINGLES— American Bank * 
Trust Co.. Monroe, N. C. 

• TIME SIGNAL JINGLES Tradesmen's 
Bank « Trust Co., Vlneland, N. J. 

. . and hundreds morel 



PPLIAN 



• NOME IMPROVEMENT CAMPAIGN - Reld 
Hardware a Electric Co., Arkadelphla. 
Ark. 

• HOMEMAKER HARMONIES Wlneland Ap- 
pliance Store. Meadvllle, Pa. 

• FORWARD AMERICA Belk Jones Co, 
Teiarkana, Tens. 

. . . and hundreds morel 



• FLORIST JINGLES LsBarge Flower Store, 
Burlington, VI 

• MUSIC IN THE MORGAN MANNER Florist 
Association. Blnghamton. N r 

• GIFT OCCASION CAMPAIGN Frank M. 
Page, Inc., Florists, Springfield, Mass 

• STEAMBOAT JAMBOREE Klmmerllng 
Bros., Roanoke, Va. 

• FORWARD AMERICA Statesboro Floral 
Shop, Statesboro, Ci 

. and hundreds morel 



• HOMEMAKER HARMONIES 
Furniture Co., Storm Lake, lows 

• FREEDOM IS OUR BUSINESS 
Bros., Albany, N. Y. 

• FURNITURE JINGLES N 
Co , Lincoln, Nebreska. 

• LEAN BACK 4 LISTEN 
Co., Sarasota, Flo. 
. . . and hundreds 



• FREEDOM IS OUR BUSINES 
City Union ol Plumbers, Okli 

• FORWARD AMERICA America 
ent Medical A Health Asso< 
Diego. Cam 

• STEAMBOAT JAMBOREE 
Co, Jackson, Miss 

• HOME IMPROVEMENT CAMPAIGN 
Glass A Paint Co., Fargo, 
head, Minn 





_ 




4 IAIER HARMONIES Canadians 

I !t, ltd., Grande Prairie, Alberta. 

at, 

I ID AMERICA Florida Power Corp., 
tersbutg, Florida. 

JO AMERICA Columbus Southern 
. lectnc Co . Columbus. Ohio 
OM IS OUR BUSINESS Gulf States 
ct Co., Baton Rouge, la 
and hundred* morel 



■BOAT JAMBOREE James Allen A 
I ur, Charleston, S C 
I )0M IS OUR BUSINESS R E. Coro 
j In Co., Macon, Ga , 

M TIME JINGLES Grant jewelers. 

isboro, K? 

LNY JINGLES J. Oaynet Jewelry, 

, Utah. 

. end hundreds morel 



■ DICK HAYMES SHOW lorden's, lit 
Rouie. la 

• HOMEMAKER HARMONIES lorden'sj 
Modesto, Calif 

• FORWARD AMERICA lest E»er Dairy 
New Castle, Indiana. 

• MUSICAL WEATHER JINGLES — loeh'S 
Dairy, Norwich, Coda. 

• STEAMIOAT JAMBOREE - Calgary Milk 
Foundation. Calgary, Alberta, Can 

. and hundreds morel 



• FUR JINGLES I Cniasson Furs, Edmunds- 

ton, New Brunswick. Canada. 

• DICK HAYMES SHOW llcha Firs, Ll ' 
Cnsse, Wisconsin. 

• FUR STORAGE CAMPAIGN Polisette Fori 
4 Greenbiatt's Fort, Fort Wayne, Ind 

• LYN MURRAY SHOW Wermith Furs, Slews 
Falls, 1 




BEVERAGE 



HAYMES SHOW Coca Coll lottling 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 

HAYMES SHOW George Wiedemann 
ring Co , Vlncennes, Ind. 
IETY HOUR Filstill Brewing Co, 

Orleans, La. 

IC IN THE MORGAN MANNER Allan 
Boer, Columbia, S C. 
ICAl TIME SIGNALS 1869 Coffee 4 

Inc., Waco, Tens. 

BALL PROGRAM SIGNATURE Miller's 
I life leer, Bradford, Pi. 

. and hundreds morel 



«ARD AMERICA Wooden i 
uncr Co., Xinsas City, Mo. 
D ROSE SHOW H. P. McCord 4 
Ins . Biker, Oregon 
IMBOAT JAMBOREE w G. Birmore, 
N-tflald, Calif. 

'El BY THE SIDE OF THE ROAD 
er ACoi inc., Covington, Va. 
DOM IS OUR BUSINESS local 

Prelection Co., Glens Fills, 



Time-Buyers 
Account Execuri 



Your WORLD AfMiale station it 
your best for lop quality ihowi 
locally. Chock your WORLD ttalion 
for tho new Robert Montgomery 
.how. "FREEDOM IS OUR BUSI- 
NESS," Steamboat Jamboroo," th« 
"Oiclc Haymct Show," "Forward 
America" and tho "lyn Murray 
Show." WORLD Commercial Jin- 
gl»», another WBS special feature, 
include time and weather attention- 
gettert and all manner of arrest- 
ing sponsor-identification for jew- 
elers, furriers, automobile dealers, 
furniture stores, apparel shops and 
many more. 

World Stations Have the 

Shows, the Ratings, the 

Know-How! 



Week After Week 
World-Affiliates 
Report Long-Term 
Money-Making 
Contracts With 
WORLDS 
Ever-Growing 
Features and 
Over 42 Special 
Campaigns . . . 
Backed by Powerful 
World-Planned 
Sales Helps! 



i 



i 






i 



PROGRAM SERVICE 

WORLD BROADCASTING SYSTEM, INC. 

488 Madison Avenue, New York 22, New York 



morel 



The chant of the 
Tobacco Auctioneer 
will soon be heard 
throughout 
agriculturally Rich 
Eastern Carolina 

. . . which means 

MILLIONS of 
DOLLARS 

in the pockets of 

WGTM 

LISTENERS 

CASH IN on this, 

one of the Nation's 
Richest Harvests 
by Selling with 

WGTM 

5,000 Watts • CBS Aft. 

WILSON, N. C. 

The World's Largest Tobacco Market 

'Phone, write or wire 

ALLEN WANNAMAKER 

Cen. Mgr. WCTM, Wilson, N. C 




iripiiir 



Harold L. Schafer 

President 
Gold Seal Company, Bismarck, N. D. 



Gold Seal sells over 50,000 cans of Glass Wax daily ; its total share 
of business at the retail level for all products amounting to almost 
$20,000,000 yearly. But it hasn't always been this way. 

For the graphic rise of Gold Seal is a high-gloss tribute to the limit- 
less vitality of 39-year-old Harold Schafer who built his business 
from a $902 gross in 1942 to where it is now — one of the top 10 in 
the floor wax industry. 

Key factors in this expansion are Shafer's confidence in broadcast 
advertising, his know-how, and quick thinking opportunism. Typical 
Schafer sagacity: (1) he dramatically tied in the anti-slip quality of 
Gold Seal floor wax with his sponsorship of state high school basket- 
ball tourneys in Minnesota; (2) told of an availability on Arthur 
Godfrey's network show via long distance phone, he OK'd its pur- 
chase before he hung up; (3) purchased the Kefauver investigation 
telecasts in Chicago to advertise his clean-up products. 

Gold Seal's broadcast history started modestly with announcements 
written and sometimes personally broadcast by Schafer in his home 
state, North Dakota. But bigger plans for Glass Wax were being 
formulated by Schafer, an ex-hardware supply salesman and 230- 
pound buman dynamo. After pre-testing in Duluth, Schafer gam- 
bled everything in Chicago. He moved in with all media, utilizing 
radio heavily. Within six weeks, 44% of all Chicago housewives 
were using Glass Wax. 

From there product sales burgeoned. Currently Gold Seal runs 
announcements on 53 radio and TV stations including several of 
the North Dakota stations Schafer utilized before he went "national" 
(KFYR, Bismarck, KLPM, Minot). 

Present broadcast strategy for Gold Seal and their agency, Camp- 
bell-Mithun: to hit hard on key stations during the spring and fall 
when the sales story for Glass Wax is likely to find a most sympa- 
thetic audience. From the fall of 1948, when Gold Seal bought a 15- 
minute segment of Arthur Godfrey, over 50% of ad expenditures 
have been in radio and TV. The peak was reached in 1950 with 
broadcast advertising representing 70% of total time and space bud- 
gets — or well over a million dollars a year. 



22 



SPONSOR 



MR. SPONSOR: 




{| WJBK sells Black Raspberry 

^^ A NEW DRINK 

TO 1 OUT OF EVERY 4 DETROIT HOMES 
. . . WITHIN 5 WEEKS! 



June 22, 1951 



Jack . the w B i e BK lb ° y 
Station WJBK 

Dear Jack: 



Though tare's talk ^Uing.^^^ 
badly in TV market the ou ^ Bellboy" program in 
these reports ie g your ^ gtronger and more 

De t roii . " c 

than ever! rl . pnt Faygo Beverage 

You will -call that ojJ^^ncemSts on your 
Co-- cautiously trxed ajew^sp h ^ 

Sece^So. le itepp-d ^l^-en Stic > al I 

The results we re-- to put sq consls tently • 

That's why we ve been w ^^ 



Raspbe 



.-, _ rn„, Fruit tiiaois. 
when we broke the new Fay go True r ^ 

R-week campaign . . • f" a ° his a rea within 5 weeks 



n ■ " • e in a this area wtthin 5 weeks. 
i Tout'of every 4 homes m this ar^^ ^ thg 



veai , jr »"• — 

the 8-week campaign 



in 1 out of every 4 home 5 in before in the 

Nothing Uke^t has eve^^^ 

beverage traae a." 

Thanks for a job well done 
work. 



Keep up the good 
Cordially yours. 



a. 



ice, 



Julian A. Gj 
J re B SU &R fc CO. 



H- 



JAG:bjr 



in only 
/hether 



f/~* Think of it! 25% of Detroit homes bought a brand new drink in only 
5 weeks. Whatever your selling problem in busy Detroit, whether 
contest promotions, sales of beverages or dancing lessons, WJBK's high Hoopers and 
tremendous listener-response make WJBK the best advertising buy for greatest sales 
results. Call your Katz man today. 




WJBK 



-AM 

-FM 

-TV 



DETROIT 



The Station with a Million Friends 

ES HEADQUARTERS: 488 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 11, ELDORADO 5-2455 
Represented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 



V 



16 JULY 1951 



23 




i Ml ItW 




iVete developments on SPONSOR stories 



with 



• Listenership gain of 59.5% 

• Every Top CBS Program 

• Audience compelling local 
programming 





♦Since 1940 
New Homes 30,221 
New Commercial 
Buildings 1216 

National 
Representative, 

dam J. Young, Jr. 

F. E. Busby, 
General Manager 




See: "What pulls 'em in?" 

Issue: 19 June 1950, p. 24 

Subject: Dollar-for-dollar comparison of 

newspaper vs. radio selling impact 



In four recent Washington ARBI studies conducted for WRC. 
NBC-owned station in the capital, radio advertising produced more 
traffic and a greater percentage of dollar volume than did equal 
dollar expenditures for newspaper advertising. Stores taking part in 
the test were Woodward and Lothrop I department store) and Jelleff's 
Inc. (women's specialty store), with general arrangements handled 
by Mahlon Glascock, WRC sales manager. 

ARBI's key findings: radio brought in large numbers of customers 
who hadn't seen newspaper advertising, proving radio offered ad- 
vertisers a separate market not reached by newspapers. Radio adver- 
tising also had a higher cumulative effect than newspapers; in the 
three-day study, radio-induced traffic built up steadily but newspaper 
traffic dropped off on the third day. 

In Los Angeles recently. Barker 
Harris and Frank. Sears Roebuck & 
ARBI tests with L. A. newspapers. 
Sweeney, KFI general sales manager, radio is winning conclusive 
victories. 

In Oakland. Cal.. KROW sold Sears Roebuck a year-long schedule 
consisting of 10 announcements daily, six days a week on the basis 
of evidence about radio uncovered in an ARBI test. The store spent 
$340 for an ad in the Oakland Tribune, made a careful tally of the 
results. Then, 10 days later Sears spent the same money with KROW 
for 50 announcements over three and a half days. The newspaper 
sold 141 changes of oil; 427 rose bushes; 22 table model radios. 
Radio's tally: 257 oil changes; 1,161 bushes; 47 radios. 

Norman Neubert, NBC's merchandising manager, gave department 
stores additional insight into radio's effectiveness recently. In a 
speech before the National Retail Dry Goods Association — "Making 
Radio Pay Its Way in Sales" — Neubert pointed out that radio lis- 
tenership averages four hours and four minutes daily per listener: 
newspaper reading time per person, 58 minutes. 



Brothers, Eastern-Columbia, 

Company all participated in 

There, according to Kevin 




See? "Bakers on the air" 

Issue: 25 September 1950, p. 23 

Subject: Air promotion by national, regional 
and local baking firms builds store 
bread sales 



The Quality Bakers of America Co-Operative Inc., is a longtime 
user of announcements and singing commercials via spot radio. But 
last month the co-operative group of local bakers tried a one-shot 
network radio show, a 30-minute semi-documentary called Key of 
Glass and starring Frederic March and Deborah Kerr on 75 ABC 
stations. Theme: a story marking the 10th anniversary of the addi- 
tion of thiamin to bread. The cost was a bit over $20,000. with the 
reaction from the baking industry and radio people enthusiastic. 

So much so, that Quality Bakers have surveyed their group as to 
the possibility of doing six network shows this fall. These plans are 
rumored: the programs will have "name'' leads; three of them will 
take the semi-documentary tack of the initial venture by heralding 
different discoveries of vital importance to the baking industry. The 
other three shows will have themes based on holidays like Easter. 
Thanksgiving. Christmas. Entertainment will be the keynote. 



24 



SPONSOR 




RADIO AND TELEVISION STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



NEW YORK 

BOSTON 

CHICAGO 

DETROIT 

SAN FRANCISCO 

ATLANTA 

HOLLYWOOD 




10 



How is your sales- prospecting these 

Over here on the Mutual range, sd 
the smartest oldtimers in the busin< 
making new discoveries every d 



jo] 

Lrt 



listeners ... at lowest costs ... all t 



8 



the clock ... all week long . . . 

This simply confirms what Mister PLl 



pov 







saying right along: network radio (on 
pi, the one network concentrating 100% 

jdio) i s second to none as an effi cient, 

i 

cost tool for mass sales. 



now Mutual morni ng time, one of the 
st customer-deposits of all, is cinching 
proof of these values, as sure as sunrise. 



Alka-Seltzer, Bab-O, Kraft, Lucky Strike, Old 
Gold, Quaker Oats . . . this is the company 
of advertisers whose programs are now 
reaching bigge r audience s than ever— in 
the forenoon on the PLUS Network. 

The signpost below can point an immediate 
route to better sales prospects for you! 




WPAT 



announces a 

Rate Increase* 

effective Sept. 10, 1951 



Radio's 3 Its PROVE WPAT The PREFERRED STATION in Rich North Jersey 



Ratinqs 



The 1951 Bergen-Passaic County PULSE (223,000 Radio Homes**) PROVES WPAT greatly increased its 1950 LEAD OVER 
ALL NEW YORK & NEW JERSEY Independents and gained strongly on all Network stations. 

we're up 20% 

WPAT'S Greater New York-New Jersey TOTAL AUDIENCE (Pulse — Jon-Feb-Mar 1950-51) shows another hefty increase. 

we're up 25% 

Response 

Commercial mail total of 20,104 for January 1951 PROVES WPAT'S STRONG POSITION IN ESSEX COUNTY (250,000 Radio 
Homes**) and parallels the 1951 Pulse Report for Bergen-Passaic Counties. 

(SEVENTY-FOUR PERCENT of the N. J. mail was received from ESSEX, BERGEN & PASSAIC counties— representing nearly 
■■_■ MILLION RADIO HOMES! 

These are but a few QUANTITATIVE facts related to WPAT'S audience — in the rich North lersey market. 

AND REMEMBER — every measurement continually proves — NEARLY 2 3's OF OUR TOTAL AUDIENCE 
IS IN NEW YORK CITY. 

QUALITATIVELY — and most important of all — 

Results/ 

Agency for a current national drug account writes: "You are the TOP STATION IN THE UNiTED STATES FOR RESULTS 
and we are USING OVER 700 STATIONS on a selected list. We think your RATE INCREASE ABSOLUTELY JUSTIFIED". 

A leading North Jersey department store reports the largest out-of-town business in its history following a series of two-day spot campaigns 
on WPAT. 

A major TV manufacturer just renewed for the THIRD CONSECUTIVE YEAR as a result of, we quote: "WPAT continues to 
sell home demonstrations at one of the lowest costs of ANY radio station in the New York-New Jersey market". 

A nationally known dry cleaning chain with almost 200 stores in the New York-New Jersey area reports: "After only two weeks we are 
enjoying big increases in business in many localities directly traceable to WPAT advertising. " 

WPAT — NORTH JERSEY BROADCASTING, INC. — PATERSON, N. j. — 5000 watts — 930 k.c. 

*6 months protection. Approx. 20% announcement increase — program segments variable... 
«"»1949 BMB Figures. 

28 SPONSOR 



White Rock and K & E executives mull over their fall plans 

Q. What kind of TV should we buy? 



Q. How much should go for radio 
as against TV in TV areas? 



O. Should we build our own local 
shows? 



Q. Should we buy film or live? 



Q. What can we do about a distribution problem which 
makes network sponsorship almost ridiculous? 



Q. Suppose we can't get good spot availabilities? 




Q. How can we merchan- 
dise the show? 



Q. Isn't a live commercial better 
than filmed spots? 



Q. Will this featured personality work on 
promotions or can't he be bothered? 




S. Van Die, K. & E. A. E.; A. Y. Morgan, Pres. White Rock; T. Prosser, Ad. & Sis. Dir.; H. Davis, K. & E. V.P.; E. Scoville, K. & E. AM-TV Mgr. 

Fall 1951: Much money, many problems 

While profit potential is rieh, economic dangers abound. Here's a quick 

look at SPONSOR'* Fall Facts issue, designed to aid decision makers 



over-all 



Stalin's gamble in Korea 
may yet pay off if peace 
prospects create business-as-usual re- 
action in U. S. commercial and govern- 
ment circles; prices tumble rapidly; if 
present high inventories in many cate- 
gories of goods are disposed of at a 
sacrifice. 

It is in the face of dangers like these 
that advertisers make their fall plans. 

16 JULY 1951 



They must gear themselves not only to 
outsell the competition, but to keep the 
country's system of distribution itself 
from bogging down. 

The opportunities are rich. Average 
weekly earnings in manufacturing in- 
dustries, for example, were at $64.35 
weekly in May of this year compared 
with $57.54 last May, according to the 
U. S. Department of Commerce. De- 



partment store sales were slight!} 
higher in mid-June \ { )r>l than the same 
period last year. Defense contracts 
will begin pouring money into the eco- 
nomy in an ever-increasing stream 
until at \ ear's end an expected spend- 
ing level of $50 billions annually is 
reached (present level: $30 billions). 
Summed up. the fall situation for 
business is: much money, many prob- 

29 




'Big Show" will be back as symbol of NBC faith in AM though ratings were disappointment 



lems for sponsors. 

To help businessmen plan effectively 
for fall campaigns, sponsor has sur- 
veyed all aspects of radio and tele- 
vision in this, its fifth annual Fall 
Facts Issue. Recognizing that the role 
of radio and television has never been 
more important, that the problems of 
making wise advertising decisions 
have never been more difficult, the edi- 
tors have attempted to sum up in a 
series of questions and answers facts 
and factors most important to spon- 
sors for this fall. 

sponsor's report to advertisers is 
broken down into six major sections: 
Spot Radio; Network Radio; Radio 



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Theatre TV adds to complexity of Fall picture 



Basics; Spot TV, Network TV, and 
Over-all (embracing subjects which 
are industry wide). But there can be 
no real separation of subjects in the 
advertiser's mind. What's happening 
in television affects radio plans; the 
effect of television on radio in sharpen- 
ing its efforts and improving the me- 
dium must, in turn, affect the adver- 
tiser's altitude toward radio. 

The television freeze situation is an 
important example, sponsor's editors 
found that, instead of clearing the way 
for more TV stations soon, the FCC 
allocation plan had opened up a new 
Pandora's box (see Network TV sec- 
tion I . This means that the emergence 
of television as a truly national me- 
dium must, at earliest, await the fall 
of 1952 or '53; that radio's role as the 
one low-cost, truly national advertising 
medium must be underscored this fall. 
In a situation where hard selling every- 
where in the nation looms as a neces- 
sity to business, advertisers won't have 
TV as an ally except in those major 
markets where its already over-loaded 
facilities are now at work. 

So il goes throughout all phases of 
radio and television one factor inter- 
twining with another in dizzying spi- 
rals: Television's effect on the box of- 
fice frightening sports promoters who 
in turn experiment I>\ granting rights 
to theatre I \ ; tins, in turn, stirring 



consumer reaction which may hurt al- 
ready weakened set sales. Or, network 
radio rate cuts spurring a sell-radio- 
build-radio attitude among affiliates 
which in turn has a constructive effect 
on network radio activities and morale. 

In the paragraphs that follow, in- 
dustry problems are summarized, in- 
cluding net radio, spot radio, spot TV, 
and net TV. Network radio, particu- 
larly, is on the roller coaster. Fall. 
1951. will mark many network adjust- 
ments. With fall, 1951 reduced rates 
for most net advertisers (10 to 15% 
down) will begin. It will be the first 
season when low-cost shows completely 
dominate the night scene. It's a season 
which will see network radio continue 
its evolution toward flexibility — in 
time slot and split-network offerings; 
in local cut-ins designed to beam 
varied messages to different markets 
via the same show; in availability of 
several shows on a rotating, tandem 
basis. 

Network radio's season of change is 
also a time of opportunity for adver- 
tisers. With sponsors letting go of 
show franchises to shift over to heavy 
TV spending, tested programs are 




News is strong point in net programing lineups 



available for the snapping up. My 
Friend Irina (CBS), for example, is 
on tap at $7,500 I including transcribed 
repeat broadcast). Its last season 14.7 
Nielsen placed it sixth among all radio 
programs and gave it a low cost-per- 
lliousand-fainilies of $3.57. Juicy buys 
galore can be found on all nets, many 
of them well-tested sales producers 
dropped b\ advertisers in this era of 
flux. 

Though prophets have calamity- 
howled network radio off center stage, 
there are opportunities for a come- 
back this fall. The need of business 



30 



SPONSOR 




Red Skelton will be among new faces on net TV 

for hard selling, as cited above, is one 
factor. Another is the steadying in- 
fluence improved morale will have on 
network sales planners. Already, they 
are beginning to feel that advertisers 
are not completely down on network 
radio, informal sponsor surveys indi- 
cate. This spirit may stimulate more 
creative sales activity, with the net- 
works going to new advertisers or ex- 
isting ones bearing ideas for new use 
of radio — rather than attempting to 
lure the business of other nets. Many 
advertisers themselves are hoping for 
such a renaissance (see statement by 
Jeff Wade, owner of Wade Advertising, 
Chicago, page 176). 

One interesting sidelight on the 
question of morale is NBC's The Big 
Show. It was a financial flop last sea- 
son, bringing meagre returns in bill- 
ings and ratings. But NBC is appar- 
ently determined to return with The 
Big Shoiu, still the keystone of its Sun- 
day night lineup. The net has hopes 
that audience will build and feels, as 
well, that newspaper and magazine 
publicity garnered by the show for net- 
work radio are almost worth the loss 
involved. The program reflects radio's 
determination to hold its own in the 
TV era — though its huge talent bud- 
get is atypical. (Even after leaving the 
air for the summer, the show's pub- 
licity harvest continued with the recent 
Life titillation-copy-and-picture biogra- 
phy of Tallulah Bankhead headlined 
on the cover.) 

More typically, news will continue 
building strength on the networks, 
racking up sales despite any cessation 
of fighting in Korea, most observers 
believe. Also strong are soap operas, 
with few shows likely to lose sponsors 
and new specimens being developed 
(particularly by ABC). 



The vitality of spot radio is one of 
the factors helping to stave off hysteria 
and defeatism within network ranks. 
Advertisers reading the radio trade 
press have been struck by the number 
of ads appearing signed by single sta- 
tions and frequently addressed to the 
networks as well as advertisers. These 
ads (by WOAI, WNOX, KVOO. WBT, 
WFAA, KFYR, WSM, Petry and 
WTAR among others) are testimony 
to the success stations continue to en- 
joy on a spot basis. Business has never 
been better for many; a number are 
raising their rates. 

With spot's development have come 
a number of opportunities for spon- 
sors. Stations are now gunning for 
more national business by developing 
new shows of interest to the national 
advertiser; the medium (many adver- 
tisers are discovering) is far more 
than a vehicle for one-minute an- 
nouncements. 

In searching out programing at 
miniscule cost, but with big-league 
quality, alert advertisers are studying 
the work of the various library ser- 
vices. Formerly known as music li- 
braries, these firms prepare indexed 
sets of musical transcriptions which 
they sell along with expertly-prepared 
material containing: complete scripts; 
recordings making up the show; in- 
structions on producing entire show 
as a professional package. While the 
music services sell directly to the sta- 
tions, advertisers can take advantage 
of the low-cost job they do by request- 
ing such programing from stations in 
markets where they are campaiging. 

Spot television, while parallel to 
spot radio in its functions, has devel- 
oped earlier in the game as an impor- 



tant programing medium than was 
true of AM spot. The continuing 
bottle-neck in availabilities on network 
TV has created a trend toward pur- 
chase of time for national program on 
spot basis — with the shows being 
filmed. Snow Crop and Bigelow are 
among the big boys using this strat- 
egy. Its advantages include lower 
cost; increased number of markets 
easily obtainable; better attention paid 
to promotion and allied services by the 
local station because it gains more 
revenue from the spot buy than it 
would if the same show were on net- 
work (see Network TV section). 



yes 



but 



■ 
rhel n . 

THi) ct»'( 

■ 



WBT CHARLOTTE, N.C 



Ads by stations help build morale of nets 

The tight availabilities stitualion on 
the networks will not change this fall 
because the freeze remains in effect. 
Because of the braking action the 
freeze exerts on TV progress, network 
TV programing will undergo little 
change for fall. There will be some 
new faces (Red Skelton, for example) 
but little innovation. * * * 




'Pepper Young's Family" (left) rounds out 15th successful year, while "Women In My House" 
las just gone on air, demonstrating continued strength of radio's tried and true soap operas 



16 JULY 1951 



31 



What 24 national advertisers 



will do this fall 



SPONSOR has updated two dozen of its advertising 

case histories to bring yon a capsuled 
picture of how varied firms will use the air next season 



TOBACCO 



budget 



Status: 

Americans are buying about .V < 
more cigarettes than they smoked last 
year. The leaders continue to be Cam- 
els, Lucky Strike. Chesterfield. Follow- 
ing them are Philip Morris, Pall Mall, 
and Old Gold. In terms of total cigar- 
ette output by companies, Brown & 
Williamson with Kools, Raleigh, Vice- 
roy, Avalon and Wings ranks fifth. 

Examples: 

Philip Morris spends about $7,000.- 
000 out of its $10,000,000 advertising 



32 



for the broadcast media 
through two agencies. Biow for night- 
time shows and Cecil & Presbrey for 
the daytime program. Outlays like 
this have helped Philip Morris crash 
the charmed circle of the Big Six; 
only two have succeeded of over a 
hundred cigarette brands during the 
last 10 years — Philip Morris and Pall 
Mall. Philip Morris, which uses 
Raquet Squad, The Bickersons, Horace 
Heidi. Philip Morris Playhouse, and a 
number of other radio and TV pro- 
grams, pushed up sales 20%. The fig- 
ure recorded for the fiscal year ending 
31 March was $305,804,331. Philip 
Morris plays up its unusual symbol — 
the bantam-sized bellboy. Johnny. Copy 
is built around the theme of "believe 
in yourself." Fall plans are expected to 
include same strong lineup and an in- 



crease in spot radio. 

Liggett & Myers are pushing Chester- 
fields and Fatima via highly effective 
radio and TV coverage. Perry Como 
(TV), Arthur Godfrey (TV), Bing 
Crosby, and Bob Hope have all been 
renewed for the coming season. God- 
frey and Como are only on an eight- 
week hiatus instead of usual 13. Peggy 
Lee and Mel Torme are holding down 
the Como spot, and Robert Q. Lewis 
is substituting for Godfrey on AM 
while Frank Parker and name comedi- 
ans fill in for the big redhead on TV 
show. 

Radio-wise, the "no unpleasant after- 
taste" slogan is plugged on disk jockey 
shows and sports coverage as well as 
on the network programs. Chesterfield 
picks up the tab for play-by-play cov- 
erage of the Chicago Cubs over about 

SPONSOR 



45 midwestem stations; the N. Y. 
Giants are followed around the circuit 
by WMCA, New York, and all Giant 
home games are televised over WPIX. 
"Stork Club" and "Dragnet" continue 
to increase Fatima sales. 



AUTOMOBILES 



Status: 

The automobile boys shifted gears 
too soon in their promotion drives. 
They slowed up their advertising early 
in the spring in anticipation of ma- 
terial shortages. There are and will 
be shortages so that production will he 
cut from last year's 6,300.000 units to 
about 5,400,000 units this year. But 
that still leaves a lot of cars which 
have to move from dealers' floors. Reg- 
ulation W. combined with a general 
tightening of cash, brought a slump 
that hit the independents near the end 
of March and the big boys in April. 
You can expect accelerated advertising 
in the auto field to get back some of 
those lost sales. 

Examples: 

Two firms in an excellent position 
because of the know-how gained with 
extensive , use of radio and TV are 
Oldsmobile and De Soto. DeSoto- 
Plymouth. through BBDO, has been 
airing the Groucho Marx show You 
Bet Your Life over both radio and 
TV ( NBC I . Talent and production 
costs for the radio show are about 
$10,000 weekly plus another $6,000 
for filming the AM version for TV. 
Groucho's quips have kept the country 
laughing and DeSoto-Plymouth dealers 
aappy. The show has been renewed 
r or another year and It Pays To Be 
gnorant is filling the time slots during 
the summer. Spot anouncements by 
local dealers supplement the national 
campaign. 

Oldsmobile, through D. P. Brother, 
Detroit, has integrated radio and TV 
into its advertising by sponsoring the 
CBS-TV news show across the board 
7:30 to 7:45 p.m. The well-known 
Merry Oldsmobile melody has been 
carefully exploited in a heav f radio 
and TV announcement campaign. Fall 




K. H. Bronson, dir. ad & sales prom., DeSoto: P. H. Gorman, advertising v. p., Philip Morris: 
"You Bet Your Life" renewed on AM, TV With $7,000,000 air budget, fall plans include 
( NBC), "It Pays to Bs Ignorant" on for summer present shows plus AM AM spot increase 



will probably see renewal of Oldsmo- 
bile's spot campaign. 



SOAPS & CLEANSERS 



Stains: 



■ 



Detergents are continuing their dom- 
inance of the soap field with the bar 
soaps suffering. In the so-called syn- 
thetic detergent field. Proctor & Gam- 
ble's Tide is away ahead of the field. 
But in the granulated soap race, Lever 
Bros. Rinso is ahead of P & G's Oxy- 
dol and Duz. Like other grocery prod- 
ucts, the soap items were caught up in 
the swollen inventory problem during 
the spring but by now the overstocking 
has been largely eliminated. 

Exa tuples: 

Rinso, through Ruthrauff & Ryan, 
puts about half of its total ad budget, 
or about $1,500,000. into radio and 
TV. "Broadcast advertising packs a 
wallop," says Howard Bloomquist, ad- 
vertising manager for this product. 
"Radio, especially daytime radio, 
reaches a large audience at lower cost- 
per-thousand than any other medium, 
he says. Rinso uses a daily portion ol 
the Arthur Godfrey show, segments of 
Big Town both on radio and TV, and 
radio announcements and participa- 
tions in 70 cities on about 210 station-. 
Stress on daytime radio and nighttime 
TV is the likely pattern of Rinso's fu- 



ture air activity. 

In the cleanser field, Bab-O, made 
by B. T. Babbitt Company, relies on 
radio to fight back against Ajax which 
has been threatening Bab-0 domi- 
nance. Bab-0 scrapped two soap operas 
in December 1950 for a new strategy 
which includes news reports five to 
six times daily on Mutual plus Two 
Girls Named Smith on ABC-TV. a half- 
hour Saturday daytime drama. William 
Weintraub is the agency. Robert Bren- 
ner, Bab-O's ad chief says. "We have 
found the broadcast media our best 
bet for advertising." Approximately 
80% of the company's $2,500,000 ad 
budget goes into the broadcast media. 



DRUG PRODUCTS 



Status: 

Drug firms had a good first half 
with sales generally ahead of last yen 
But there is still no unabated joj 
among the large drug advertisers. The 
Supreme Court decision upsetting fair 
trade laws has these firms concerned. 
The) don't want to see the millions 
they pour into advertising exploited 
for loss-leader purposes b\ the large 
(bains and department stores. 

Drug firms like Bristol-M) e r s. 
Whitehall. Sterling, and Miles have 
long been among the leading purchas- 
ers of airtime. The ain\a\s have helped 
make tin in giants in their field 



16 JULY 1951 



33 




C. F. Mueller, exec. v. p., C. F. Mueller Co.: R. S. Boyd, cereals, dog foods ad mgr., Nat'l. 
AM news schedule which is firm's advertising Biscuit Co.: Sticking with Godfrey, other AM 
mainstay to continue. Spot TV may be upped net shows, adding "Kukla, Fran and Ollie" 



strides is Canada Dry through J. M. 
Mathes. Canada Dry was able to 
climb from $45,100,000 in 1948 to 
$54,403,983 in 1950 putting them 
second to Coca-Cola. The firm spends 
about $650,000 per year on broadcast 
advertising which includes Super Cir- 
cus on ABC-TV and spot radio. Firm's 
strategy will probably remain un- 
changed this fall, with the amount 
going to spot radio dependent on sales 
this summer. 



PETROLEUM 



I ;.v« in |» I «' s.- 
Charles S. Beardsley. chairman of 
the board, Miles Laboratories says, 
"Alka-Seltzer and radio have dove- 
tailed into one of those perfect unions. 
We knew we had a good product but 
we never could have told America 
about it so quickly and effectively with- 
out radio." From a small beginning in 
1932 the Miles budget has grown to a 
point where it now totals about $8,- 
000,000 annually on radio and TV or 
about 85% of its total ad budget. Its 
present schedule includes four across- 
the-board features: News of the World, 
Curt Massey, One Man's Family, Hill- 
top House; plus Quiz Kids, i half- 
hour weekly TV show. Curt Massey 
time coverage has been expanded. In 
addition to a live broadcast over CBS. 
it is heard recorded one week later 
over Mutual. Miles will probably stick 
with its present fall program lineup 
and add radio/TV spot as well. 

Bristol-Myers spends about $8,000,- 
000 per year to push a wide variety of 
products, incluring Ipana, Vitalis, Sal 
Hepatica, Mum. and Ingram's Shaving 
Cream. The lion's share of the budget 
goes into radio and TV through a 
multi-agency setup that includes Do- 
herty, Clifford & Shenfield and Young 
& Rubicam. R-M uses Break the Bank 
and Mr. District Attorney on radio and 
Break the Bank and Lucky Pup on TV 
in a carefully balanced combination 
of nighttime and daytime AM and 
nighttime TV plus radio and TV spol 
schedules. 

Schedule this fall will probably 
stand pat. though plans had not been 
solidified at presstime. Reflecting the 



general trend toward increased use of 
spot radio among products of every 
description, Ipana will probably get 
heavy spot radio coverage. Only pro- 
graming change on the horizon is a 
possible modification of the Lucky Pup 
TV show. 



SOFT DRINKS 



Status: 

Despite price increases, the soft 
drink firms were able to chalk up sales 
increases over last year. Most signi- 
ficant was the record made by Coca- 
Cola, which does from 50% to 53% 
of the total soft drink business, in 
making the first quarter of 1951 the 
largest in its 65-year history. 

Examples: 

A large part of its success story can 
be credited to the estimated $3,000.- 
000 that Coca-Cola poured into radio 
and TV through D'Arcy Advertising. 
"The Pause That Refreshes" adver- 
tised on the Edgar Bergen and Charlie 
McCarthy show and Songs by Morton 
Downey, plus spot radio and TV. 
Mario Lanza is being used as a sum- 
mer replacement for Bergen who will 
be back in the fall. The Coca-Cola bud- 
get may well hit the $4,000,000 mark, 
with an additional program to begin 
in the fall. 

Another drink that has made great 



Status: 

More cars on the road, more homes 
with oil burners, plus the requirements 
by the military are among the factors 
that keep the petroleum industry 
straining to keep up with demand. The 
Iranian situation might cause a heavy 
drain on our resources. No important 
shortages are anticipated, but the 20% 
increase in over-all demand which the 
oil companies are enjoying means an 
unusually good year. 

Examples: 

Competition is still hot as each com- 
pany strives to keep its brand before 
the public. Shell Oil Company spends 
about a third of its budget, estimated 
at about $4,500,000, for radio through 
J. Walter Thompson. Shell uses spot 
radio in the form of news shows on 




H. Schachte, national ad mgr., Borden Co.: 
Standing pat with spot radio/TV strategy, 
with shift from local shows to announcements 



34 



SPONSOR 



about 56 AM stations I plus two ex- 
perimental news TV efforts on WNBT. 
New York and KTLA, Los Angeles I . 
This company finds that its radio 
strategy pays off in terms of increased 
sales and closer dealer identification 
with the company's advertising effort. 
There's not much sense in modifying a 
strategy that works as well as the Shell 
program. No changes are likely for 
the fall. 

Another strong petroleum advertiser 
on the air is Atlantic Refining Com- 
pany. It devotes most of its budget 
through N. W. Ayer to sport broad- 
casts in the East to match its distribu- 
tion. This year baseball is being broad- 
cast over a total of 80 stations for the 
games of five major league teams and 
one minor league club. In the fall 10 
to 12 football games are carried on an 
average of 10 to 15 stations. These 
sports broadcast programs were a key 
factor in the way Atlantic gross oper- 
ating income rose from $131,000,000 
in 1937 ( first year for Atlantic sports- 
casts) to $477,982,169 for 1950. Fall 
plans for football coverage this year 
are tied up in knots because of the un- 
certainty over TV clearances. If TV 
is restricted, it is likely that Atlantic 
will be increasing its radio budget. 



BREWERIES 



Status: 

The brewers once again are watch- 
ing the sales curve for their industry 




R. Brenner, dir. of adv., B. T. Babbitt: 80% 
of firm's $2,500,000 budget in air media; Mu- 
tual news, ABC-TV drama to continue this fall 



rise after a steady decline for the last 
few years. One factor that might keep 
that curve from going as high as beer 
advertisers would like is the shortage 
of beer cans. Although bottled beer 
outsells the canned brew, the trend is 
toward the metal containers. Some 
brewers fear they may not be able to 
buy enough bottles to make up for 
the shortage in cans. Radio is the 
miracle medium for brewers. 

Examples: 

Among the brewers riding the in- 
creased sales trend is Ruppert Brewery. 
Working with its agency, Biow, Rup- 
pert came up with a Father Knicker- 
bocker ( mythical father of Manhattan ) 
campaign. The campaign received 
stress in all media with the major por- 
tion going to air advertising out of a 
budget of about $2,000,000. The 
broadcast advertising included a heavy 





D. C. Marschner, ad manager, Shell Oil: won't 
change spot radio news strategy on 56 AM 
stations, continuing TV on KTLA and WNBT 



Phil Kalech, sales mgr., Tintair: bulk of $4,- 
500,000 ad budget continuing in air media 
for varied schedule, including drama, music 



H. Bloomquist, ad mgr., Rinso: daytime radio, 
nighttime TV to be stressed via announce- 
ments, programs; cost Lever $750,000 annually 



announcement schedule and the Broad- 
way Open House on TV. Ruppert's 
plans for the fall will feature a con- 
tinuation of the announcements and 
the TV program. 

Pabst is sufficiently pleased with its 
Blue Ribbon boxing programs to have 
renewed its contract with International 
Boxing Club for its CBS radio and TV 
show every Wednesday night. Fights 
will come from New York, Chicago. 
St. Louis and Detroit. The Pabst peo- 
ple discount theater TV for a couple 
of reasons: (1) With the limited num- 
ber of theaters participating. Pabst is 
confident they can outbid the "'real 
estate operators"; (2 I They think peo- 
ple would rather drink Blue Ribbon 
and watch the fights in their living 
room or favorite bar than plunk down 
a buck or more to go to a theater and 
munch popcorn during the brawl. 

Piel's beer is strengthening its spot 
schedule. Piel's uses 60-second an- 
nouncements on AM and TV: CBS 
news; and TV in New Haven. Bill Ber- 
ech, associate account executive at Ken- 
yon and Eckhardt. says "The pattern 
has been found to be very effective." 
Radio and TV get about 50', of the 
ad budget. 



FOOD FIRMS 



Status: 

Prospects are bright in the food in- 
dustry after a sales setback in March 
and April. Scare buying by consum- 



16 JULY 1951 



35 







W. S. Brown, ad mgr., Canada Dry: spot ra- 
dio and ' -uper Circus" ABC-TV show remain 
part of fall strategy for No. 2 U.S. soft drink 



ers and dealers last fall brought an 
accumulation of inventories that was 
slow in liquidating. Frozen foods are 
mushrooming, with much air adver- 
tising to help them climb. 



Examples: 

Two firms in this field that do a 
standout job of radio advertising, C. F. 
Mueller Company and National Biscuit 
Company, have no complaints about 
the demand for their products. The 
Mueller spaghetti and marconi firm 
finds sales mounting as more consum- 
ers turn to this low-cost food as a sub- 
stitute for high-priced meat. Thanks 
to skilled use of spot radio, mostly 
news show, through Duane Jones, Inc., 
Mueller was able to double its sales in 
nine years. Radio and TV takes the 
hulk of Mueller's ad budget. A few 
TV announcements are used and these 
may be expanded in the fall. 

National Biscuit Company allocates 
about 40% of its total budget, or about 
12,000,000, to radio and TV. Nabisco 
uses Arthur Godfrey. Straight Arrow, 
a children's show, a spot radio that in- 
cludes news and Housewives' Protec- 
tive League participations and some 
TV announcements. Typical of the com- 
pany's enthusiasm for the broadcast 
medium is the statement by R. Stewart 
Howl. Nabisco advertising chief for 
cereals and dog food products. Speak- 
ing of the kid's Straight Arrow show, 
he said, "We are very fortunate in hav- 
ing a good selling medium directed to 
children on which we may offer pre- 
miums." Edward A. Gumpert, the ad- 
vertising official responsible for the 



cracker division, speaks of Godfrey as 
one of the company's star salesmen. 
National Biscuit will be using the same 
schedule next fall and adding Kukla, 
Fran and Ollie, NBC-TV. 



COSMETICS 



Status: 

Probably no industry is more brand 
conscious than the toiletry and cos- 
metic industry. That means that they 
were among the loudest mourners 
when the Supreme Court upset fair 
trade. On the sales side, business has 
been good and generally ahead of last 
year. One production problem that 
might cut down sales in the lipstick 
field is a shortage of castor oil an im- 
portant ingredient for this product 
now required for military needs. 



Examples: 

This field usually bubbles with new 
promotions, and two products that 
made the most promotion news during 
the year were Tintair and the Hazel 
Bishop No-Smear Lipstick. Both shot 
to the top through heavy radio and 
TV advertising. Tintair was able to 
chalk up a sales gross of $5,000,000 
during the first six months. Tintair, 
through Cecil & Presbry spends about 
$4,500,000 for advertising, most of it 
going into radio and TV. Programs 
include the Somerset Maugham Thea- 
ter on radio and TV, the Sam Leven- 
son show on TV and participations on 
the Cavalcade of Stars and the Caval- 
cade of Bands, both DuMont TV 
shows. Tintair will drop Levenson, has 
not yet completed plans for another 
show. 

After being launched with a series 
of radio announcements the Hazel 
Bishop lipstick sales climbed to $4,- 
500,000 in 10 months. In the mean- 
time the advertising budget placed 
through Raymond Spector rose to $2,- 
000,000. During the spring, the broad- 
cast schedule included Kate Smith 
( TV ) , Cavalcade of Bands and Caval- 
cade of Stars. The Freddy Martin show 
over 62 NBC-TV stations will cost 
$1,500,000 this summer. H. Sondheim. 
account executive, says "Without a 



doubt, TV has done a terrific job for 
us and radio has been very effective 
in specific markets." 



BAKERIES 



Status: 

The baking industry is another field 
that shared in the general sales slump 
during the early part of the year. The 
sales curve began to rise again at the 
end of spring. Competition is un- 
usually strong in this field, making 
brand identification one of the most 
potent ways of selling bread. 

Examples: 

Among the top advertisers on the 
air among the bakeries is Continental 
Baking Company, the largest bakery 
in the world. It spends about $2,000.- 
000 through Ted Bates, and the bulk 
of its budget goes for radio and TV. 
Network radio carries its Grand Slam 
show, while Hopalong Cassidy on TV 
keeps the kids entertained in about six 
of its markets. TV and radio announce- 
ments are also used. One reason for 
the giant bakery's stress on radio was 
explained by Lee Mack Marshall. Con- 
tinental's ad chief, "It's the only me- 
dium that hits women directly. Other 
media gives us too much waste circu- 
lation." 

Another baking outfit that knows 
how to use the airwavs is the Quality- 




Lee Mack Marshall, ad mgr., Continental Bak- 
ing: still aiming for women audience; bulk 
of $2,000000 budget stays in radio-television 



36 



SPONSOR 




V. H. Gies, advertising v. p., Mars: Biggest air J. M. Allen, public relations v. p., Bristol- 
user among candies has tricks up its sleeve, Myers: upping spot radio for Ipana, prob- 
including alternate-week radio sponsorship ably standing pat with the present programs 



Bakers of America, a cooperative 
group of about 104 manufacturing 
bakeries located throughout the coun- 
try. It devotes a substantial part of 
its $5,000,000 budget to radio and TV 
I placed direct ) . 

"We are trying to reach the house- 
wife," says Jack Coffee. Quality's di- 
rector of radio and TV, "and radio 
affords us the best means to do this; 
we get her at her place of work." Quali- 
ty prepares AM program transcrip- 
tions, film recordings for TV. musical 
jingles for both media, plus local 
shows. This sponsor's plans for fall 
include a number of half-hour AM 
dramas with big name talent. 



CONFECTIONS 



Status! 

High costs that cannot be easily 
passed on to the consumer are making 
the candy boys unhappy although sales 
are holding up well after the tempo- 
rary inventory pileup. Prices have 
risen somewhat, but not enough candy 
people say. More promotion is ex- 
pected on the dime bars in an attempt 
to lick this problem. 

I •' .v« in |»J«*: 

Biggest user of the air media among 
the candy firms is Mars, through Leo 
Burnett. Chicago. Mars spends about 
$3,000,000 in radio and TV. Last sea- 



son it used a half-hour segment of 
Stop the Music, Inner Sanctum, Can 
You Top This, and Bob Barkley, Amer- 
ican Agent, all ABC shows. On TV it 
carries Howdy Doody two nights a 
week. So far Mars has set only two 
shows for its fall air campaign. It has 
I 1 1 renewed Hoivdy Doody and (2) 
picked up People Are Funny for the 
Tuesday night at 8:00 slot on CBS. 
People starts 9 October and will be car- 
ried over 125 or more CBS stations. 
The program, starring Art Linkletter, 
was sponsored on NBC until recently 
by Brown & Williamson I for Raleigh 
cigarettes) . 

Unique part of the Mars deal is that 
it is for every other week only. The 
alternate week remains sustaining and 
CBS will make every effort to sell it. 
This may very well be the first alter- 
nate-week deal in AM history, reflect- 
ing the influence of what has become a 
common practice in TV. 

In television, sponsors make alter- 
nate-week deal to bring high costs of 
full-length programing down to within 
their means. But the Mars deal is 
probably less a reflection of the firm s 
desire to save money than an indica- 
tion that it is striving for program di- 
versification. 

It's probable Mars will put mone, il 
saves on the alternate-week arrange- 
ment into another show of a different 
l\|>< — in order to reach another audi- 
ence. Last season's Mars line-up con- 
sisted of two shows each of contrasting 
quiz and mystery-drama types. 

(Advertest Research recently com- 
pleted a survey of alternate-week spon- 
sorship in TV. It may be valuable as 
well to AM sponsors; see page 159.) 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



Status: 

Sales in the dairy field are good and 
the only complication that could dis- 
turb the outlook here is the rising 
price of meat. When meat pi ices go 
up there is an inducement for farmers 
to slaughter their marginal milkers so 
there may be a cut in milk supply. 

Examples: 

Carnation Company, largest of the 
evaporated milk firms, devotes the 
bulk of its advertising to radio and TV 
at the rate of about $2,400,000 a year. 

The fall schedule will see Burns and 
Allen back on TV and Tony Martin 
and Jo Stafford continuing on the 
Contented Hour. 

Another advertiser who will be con- 
tinuing his same strategy is the Borden 
Company, through Young & Rubican. 
Decentralization of advertising so that 
the local dealer can reap the maximum 
benefits is further complicated by the 
fact that the company uses 156 ad bud- 
gets to cover a wide variety of prod- 
ucts. National advertising manager 
Henry Schachte says, "Our fall '51 
plans for All-Borden radio and TV are 
essentially a continuation of what we 
are currently doing — local radio I both 
programs and spots I and television 
spots (both daytime and evening). In 
most cases, any shifts we are making 
are from AM programs to anounce- 
ments. In only one market — out of 
more than 100 — are we shifting to TV." 




L. Nolte, ad mgr., Carnation Milk: "Burns & 
Allen" TV show will be back, "Contented Hour" 
with Tony Martin, Jo Stafford continues on AM 



16 JULY 1951 



37 





THE NEEDLE!" 

This timely newsletter goes to APS 
subscribers each month, bringing 
them up-to-the-minute informa- 
tion and suggestions which station 
v>: . managers, programming and sales 

personnel can use productively in 
building more business. Written by a sales expert, 
it offers a wealth of ideas and facts unobtainable 
elsewhere. 



We received the copies of "THE NEEDLE!" and they will be put to good 
use. I have every reason to believe they will result in additional business 
for us. PAUL ELLIOTT, KRNT, Des Moines 

Our sales organization consider "THE NEEDLE!" one of the most helpful 
instruments that has been put in their hands for a long time. 

GRANT POLLOCK, KXOB, Stockton, Cal. 

Thanks for my first copy of "THE NEEDLE!" and very smart piece of work 
. . . and a mighty valuable one for my department. I can see many, many 
sales campaigns cominci up in '51. 

NORM WILLIAMS, CJOB, Winnipeg, Can. 

I certainly am delighted at each copy of "THE NEEDLE!" There is so 
much meat in this that one copy is simply not enough. While I realize 
you can't supply unlimited numbers to stations, I wish you would arrange 
to send me six (6) copies of each issue, and whatever charge you need 
to make, we will be glad to pay it. 

L. S. MITCHELL, GM, WDAE, Tampa, Fla. 

would appreciate it very much if you could put us on the mailing list for 
three copies of "THE NEEDLE!" It is very helpful and I would like to 
have a copy for each salesman. 

EDWARD A. WHEELER, PRES., WEAW-FM, Evanston, III. 

Volume I, No. I is a great success. Very pleased with the content of "THE 
NEEDLE!" and the saies help which you have included. 

GEORGE VOLGER, KWPC, Muscatine, Iowa 

If it is permissible to have more than one copy of "THE NEEDLE!", will 
you please send them to us? We think this new Associated Service will be 
of tremendous help in our sales approach. Thank you very much. 

IRVING ZEIDMAN, PD, KNOE, Monroe, La. 

"THE NEEDLE!" improves ali the time. So much so in fact that we are ex- 
amining them for better usage by our folks. If possible, we would like to 
request that copies be mailed directly to each of our salesmen here so 
that they may take a more personal interest in reading it. 

STEVE RYDER, MGR., WENE, Endicott, N. Y. 



I got your ocpy of "THE NEEDLE!" and it's darn good stuff. As a matter 
of fact, if it" isn't presumptuous of me, I would like to have instead of one 
copy, three or four copies so that I can equip each salesman with one. I 
find that's much better than trying to pass one copy around. 

SI GOLDMAN, MGR., WJTN, Jamestown, N. Y. 



TRANSCRIBED SALES MEETINGS 

# These 30-minute, informal sales 
meetings on discs (six of them 
already in use) have been pre- 
pared for presentation direct to 
the station's sales staff. Each is 
conducted by Maurice B. Mitchell, APS vice presi- 
dent and general manager. The series also features 
well-known guest speakers discussing various phases 
of more productive radio selling. 

We had our third APS transcribed sales meeting and lis- 
tened to "THE DEPARTMENT STORE AND RADIO 
ADVERTISING." We felt the comment contained in this 
particular program to be basically very sound and appli- 
cable to almost every kind of retail outlet even though 
you keyed it for department store only. 
Koep up the good work. We'll be looking for #4 in the 
near future. 

K. RICHARD CREITZ, WEEU, Reading, Pa. 

I am very well pleased with the results of our first tran- 
scribed sales meeting and am congratulating myself on 
my sagacity in signing up for Associated Service. 

FRANK ROBISCHON, KBMY, Billings, Mont. 




IN-PERSON SALES AND PROGRAM CLINICS 

^3 Regional conferences, held through- 
out the country for APS subscribers, 
now provide on-the-spot aid and 
counsel on programming and selling. 
Four successful sessions have already been staged 
and others are scheduled for every region. Besides 
this, APS representatives regularly visit subscriber 
stations and often accompany station salesmen on 
their local selling calls. 



This has been the most practical programming and sales 
meeting I've attended . . . practical for present day 
radio, that is. DEANE FLETT, KTBS, Shreveport, La. 

For the first time, one of the firms with which we do busi- 
ness is doing something helpful for their clients. Your 
service to radio stations in these meetings as well as 
the transcribed sales meetings is a real service and should 
be continued. Nothing like it has ever happened before. 
C. L. BELFI, KTSA, San Antonio, Tex. 

I have attended a lot of meetings, but never have I en- 
joyed and gotten so much out of one before. 

ROBERT MEACHAM, KTBC, Austin 

This meeting was the best I have ever attended (includ- 
ing NAB meetings). As a salesman I say do it again soon. 
I not only enjoy, but also learned much from the after- 
noon meeting. ROBERT F. TRUITT, WGPC 

I appreciate your having this meeting in Atlanta. We 
had our sales manager and all radio salesmen here from 
our station. I hope you will continue to hold these meet- 
ings. I WOULD BE WILLING TO PAY MY SHARE OF 
THE COST OF SUCH MEETINGS. 

JIM BAILEY, WAGA 

Constructive for all segments of station staff. Wish more 
could attend. Gives overall picture of radio which some 
lose sight of in day-to-day routine. Particularly appre- 
ciate amusing, yet pointed, needles shot at salesmen . . . 
wakes sleepers up, hypos hustlers. Many points of tre- 
mendous value which merit return engagement, no less 
than annually, with some station sales stories as result 
of meetings and et series. 

JIM WOODRUFF, JR., WRBC 

Your clinis that I attended in New York was all too brief. 
All of us need to be reminded of the fundamentals of 
good selling practice — your coverage of these known fac- 
tors of good selling procedure, can be helpful to anyone 
in our business. DICK GRAVEL, WTAG 



This was the beginning of a new Dhase in library "merchandising" which 
has certainly been inspiring and refreshing. Once-a-year meetings like this 
should be planned. Working out the elementary questions in advance 
could help save time in the meetings. 

FRED L. CORSTAPHNEY, WSLS, Roanoke, Va. 

This has been a most worthwhile meeting and you are to be congratulated 
on another first in the industry. WALLACE WOHS, Shelby, N. C. 

It was a wonderful meeting. The only trouble was that it was too short. 
We could have asked a thousand more questions. 

JIM RYER, WMUU, Greenville, S. C. 

I feel that this meeting was exceptionally interesting, informative, and 
certainly aided (I believe) in making the relationships between the pro- 
gram department and commercial department a good deal closer than it 
usually is. As you know, it is not unusual for a clash to exist between these 
departments. Emphasis on a closely-knit unit to make a radio station a 
success is always of prime importance. Thoroughly enjoyed the get-together. 
PETER EDMAN, WVEC, Hampton, Virginia 

This has been a most informative and a well-spent afternoon and I want to 
say that I certainly do appreciate the time you have spent and the trouble 
you have gone to to better equip us for more efficient station management 
and commercial sales. MARV STEFFINS. WMUU. Greenville, S. C. 

I was most impressed with the meeting. I believe it will bring about a 
more valuable use of our library. On the next meeting you might try and 
do a little missionary work on cooperation between program and sales 
departments. We have had it both ways at WTMA and now that the two 
departments work together, it is much mote effective. It is a problem 
that exists in most stations. R. J. SHADE, WTMA, Charleston, S. C. 



j tie 



Associated Program Service 



I have noticed an increase in enthusiasm for the art of 
selling and I hear more of the "facts and figures" type 
of sales talk being practiced around the office. 
Incidentally, I have now heard the "talk" four times and 
have yet to be bored by it. In fact, I think I enjoy it 
more each time I hear it. We have dubbed it on the 
wire recorder and each time one of our boys comes in 
dejected over a refusal, he gets out the wire and plays 
it again! 

Thanks a lot for the cooperation, and we'd like you to 
know that we are still enthusiastic about the library after 
using it almost 5 years. 

GEORGE W. YAZELL, WCFC, Beckley, West Virginia 

Congratulations on your excellent work titled "Some 
Fundamentals for Radio Salesman." 

The manner in which you approached the problem and 
your prescriptions could not have been more impressive 
and could not have more suited us if you had made it 
exclusively for WDNC. 

WOODY WOODHOUSE. WDNC, Durham, N. C. 

"The Cold Call" program — in my opinion — the best to 
date. Following through on all suggestions outlined. My 
3 salesmen also think this your best program to date. 
You're doing a fine job, Mitch, keep these programs com- 
ing. Regards. 

HARRY B. SHAW, WSJS, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



1 5 1 West 46th Street, New York 19, N. Y. 



"the library that pays for itself 9 



Maurice B. Mitchell, General Manager 

Associated Program Service 

151 West 46th Street, New York 19, N. Y. 

I'm interested in knowing more about the APS library for my station. 
Will you send the facts right away? 



Name . 
Title . 
Station 
Street 
City 



Zone. 



State- 



Sponsor cheek list 



how to use broadcast advertising^ 



Determine what you expect broadcast advertising to do 
for your organization. 

(The nine items cover general requirements of manufactur. 
ing and sales organizations but each organization has its 
own peculiar problems. These must be ascertained in ad- 
vance or else any advertising campaign will probably fail.) 

a. Force distribution 

| | b. Move product 

c. Build prestige 

d. Build brand name acceptance 

I I e. Improve dealer-manufacturer relations 

f. Impress stockholders 

g. Improve employee relations 

I I h. Supplement printed media advertising 

i. Carry organization's primary advertising burden 

Determine territorial coverage desired. 

Centralize responsibility for broadcast advertising. 



Working with your organization's advertising agency, select 
the broadcast form (spot radio, network radio, TV, FM, 
storecasting, transit radio) to carry the campaign. 

Build or buy the proper program or announcement to reach 
the market for the product. 



With the program and stations or network selected, hold 
conferences with your staff so that the entire organization 
knows the campaign and its objectives. 

Hold district meetings with your sales staff, briefing them 
on the broadcast advertising campaign. There should be 
preliminary meetings during which ideas of the sales staff 
in the field are obtained on the campaign. 



Set up a public relations conference with network or station 
publicity men, your organization's publicity department, 
agency's press staff, independent public relations men of 
talent, and perhaps package owner publicity men. 

(Working as a team, these men can increase the audience 
of any program. Without organization and cooperative 
operation, waste through duplication of publicity material 
is inevitable.) 



Establish a publicity plan for the campaign. 



Make certain that everyone involved knows the person 
in the organization who is responsible for your broadcast 
advertising. 

(That executive must be briefed on not only what the 
broadcast is supposed to accomplish but on the public 
relations aspects of the program as well. 



Make certain that talent pictures, biographies, and full 
program information (week-by-week details) are available 
to everyone requiring them. 



] Plan tie-in advertising, point-of-sale material, dealer mail- 
ings. 

(Correlation of all advertising activity with broadcasting 
pays substantial dividends.) 



] Plan the program debut as a show, not as an opportunity 
for organization executives to discourage listeners through 
long talks. 



| See that effective on-the-air promotion of program starts 
at least two weeks before the program makes its bow. 

(Free network and station time is available, but many 
advertisers are finding it productive of sales and increased 
audiences to buy bigger announcements to supplement 
what the stations and networks do.) 



] See that a complete promotion kit goes out to stations 
(if yours is a network program, the web's publicity de- 
partment will work with your agency and your advertising 
manager on this). 



] Design a dealer and distributor promotion kit on the 
program. 

(Make certain that the material does not duplicate that 
which network stations will use for the same purpose.) 



| Once the program has started to build its audience, travel 
it aiound the country. 



I Formulate plans for continuing promotion. Only through 
week-in-week-out exploitation ' can a new program really 
be sold to its full audience. 



Tie program in with all merchandising and advertising 
plans. 



| | Make certain that everything that is done promotion wise 
(guest stars, special exploitation, etc.) reaches the pub- 
licity departments of the stations, networks and your dis- 
tributors and dealers in time for them to obtain newspaper 
space. 



[ Plan mail-pulls (contests and give-aways) far enough in 
advance so that they may be merchandised at the point- 
of sale as well as on the air. 



Don't forget to write "thank you's" to the stations that 
make promotion reports on your program. 



Where possible have product packaging include refer- 
ence to the program. 



I Check newspaper reaction to the program. 

(A special press clipping order is broadcast advertising 
life insurance.) 



♦ Broadcast advertising is a living thing; it requires broadcast-by-broadcast watching, nursing, cultivating. It's a product that is being sold as 
well as one that is selling for you. Broadcasting has to be worked at and with to return full dividends. The easy way is the non-productive way. 



S 



serving the greater South Central 
Pennsylvania area day and night . . 



m 



5000 WATTS 
580K.C. 



Known as Mr. 580 in every radio home in Harrisburg and 
in the many rich, new areas added to its beat, WHP now 

delivers more sales potential than ever r before. Let the 
station that made Mr. 580 a household word help you sell 

your product in the highest per-capita retail sales center 
in the Keystone State. 

Call the Boiling Company today. 



the key station of the keystone 
state . . . Harrisburg, Penna. 



16 JULY 1951 



J 



z 



O'j 



CBS 

WHP 

5000 WATTS 
580 K.C. 



41 




A WJR listener becomes a buyer 
of WJR-advertised products. 



Thaf Ail-American Shopper — fhe housewife, bless her — is also fhe 
All-American radio lisfener. And throughout fhe Great Lakes area, WJR's Women's Editor, Mrs. Page, 
exerts a tremendous influence on this active part of the buying public. Every day, 
Monday through Saturday, her show for women makes shoppers out of listeners . . . buyers out of shoppers! 

For thorough coverage and penetration in the rich Great Lakes area, 

your best bet is WJR — the Great Voice of the Great Lakes. 
Remember . . . First they listen . . . then they buy! 

Represented nationally by Edward Petry & Company 



FREE ^i 
SPEECH 
MIKE 




Radio — America's greatest advertising medium. 



42 



SPONSOR 




network 
radio 



■ ■ ■ 



They're getting more flexible 

Network radio is in a state of flux. Stung by recent rate cuts 
and decline in revenue, the nets are planning some important 
innovations. The pages that follow provide a sponsor pre- 
view of what you may expect from the networks this fall. 
Experiments in programing, techniques that give advertisers 
some of the advantages of spot radio — are just a few of the 
things in store for fall sponsors. 

How good a buy is fall network radio in terms of these 
adjustments? That question is answered comprehensively, 
with costs-per-thousand for net radio and competing media. 
Some of the background for the rate cuts can be seen in the 
gross billings of the four leading nets. They're listed for the 
past three years. Other trend information covered: Sponsor 
leaders in billings; top ad agencies in network billings; new 
advertisers slated to use radio in the fall; the changing pro- 
gram pattern noted for fall. 

Altogether, the Network Radio section spells out the scope 
of network radio and fills in the most recent trends. Index 
at right is for your convenience in picking out various topics. 
Some you'll want to read right now, all of it will make good 
reference reading for future use. 

16 JULY 1951 



Dimensions of net radio 


44 


Circulation 


44 


Net radio business 


18 


Net radio eosts 


50 


Net radio programs 


50 


Top advertisers 


52 


Flexibility of nets 


55 


Available net packages 

54, 


58, 02 


Top agencies 


01 


New sponsors 


03 



43 







Map shows :ix P&S products pushad 
simultaneously in different territories by one network 
show ("Welcome Travelers," NBC, pictured at right 
This use of national show to do regional job 
illustrates increasing flexibility of net radio 



Dimensions of network 
radio 



Q. What's the over-all outlook for 
advertisers in network radio? 

A. The four networks— CBS. NBC. 
ABC and MBS — described in last 
year's sponsor Fall Facts issue as the 
"fat cats of the radio industry," this 
fall will have assumed a leaner and 
a hungrier look. The 10% to 15% 
rate cuts, the economy moves, and, 
above all, the evacuation of some spon- 
-oiv iii TV, have pared sonic of the 
excess fl<'sh off the webs. But now that 
they're trimmed down fine, only a ca- 
lamity-howler ol the most unvisionary 
order would claim that the networks 
have also been stripped of their nine 



lives, and are now ready to lie down 
and die. 

The fact is that network radio offers 
the astute advertiser a better buy than 
ever before. A sponsor, taking advan- 
tage of the current transitional stage 
through which the industrv is passing, 
will get more value from his advertis- 
ing dollar. He will derive benefit from 
keener competition among the radio 
webs; from their driving necessity to 
use more imagination in programing; 
from their cut-to-the-bone time and tal- 
ent cost reductions; from their height- 
ened promotional efforts. 

More than that, network radio this 
fall will, astonishingly enough, offer 
the advertiser bonus values relative to 
TV. While the sale of TV sets is now 
suffering a serious slump, the sale of 



Averags rutlnus ami vost/M of network rtttlio programs 



March 1950 


March 1951 




No. of 


Nielsen 




No. of 


Nielsen 




f .i- 


Programs 


Rating 


Cost/M 


Programs 


Rating 


Cost/M 


Concert Music 


6 


6.7 


$8.23 


10 


5.4 


$7.91 


Popular Music 


12 


7.4 


4.56 


II 


6.0 


5.15 


All Drama 


97 


10.2 


3.19 


84 


8.4 


3.64 


Daytime Serial 


31 


7.2 


1.43 


25 


7.0 


1.44 


Mystery 


23 


12.1 


3.54 


25 


8.7 


3.98 


General Drama 


23 


10.2 


4.45 


17 


8.5 


4.67 


Children's 


7 


7.1 


2.71 


8 


6.6 


2.89 


Situation Comedy 


20 


12.5 


4.34 


17 


10.3 


5.33 


Comedy-Variety 


6 


15.0 


6.13 


7 


10.3 


7.44 


Musical-Variety 


19 


9.4 


3.63 


20 


6.9 


4.01 


Quiz & Participation 


29 


7.9 


3.52 


23 


6.2 


4.50 


News & Commentary 


19 


5.7 


2.99 


25 


4.2 


3.27 



■ : A. C. t 



radio sets las detailed below) keeps 
increasing phenomenally. While the 
cost of TV time and talent will zoom 
to as high as $100,000 for an hour- 
program this fall, radio costs have nev- 
er been so attractive. Finally, some 
signs point to the fact that the novelty 
effect of TV ownership is wearing off 
while veteran viewers return to the ra- 
dio habit, especially using secondary 
sets. 



Network radio 
eireulation 



Q. What is the potential audience 
a sponsor will be able to reach on 
each of the four networks this 
fall? 

A. Americans this fall will own 71,- 
900.000 radio sets I exclusive of 19.- 
000,000 auto radios and 5.000,000 sets 
in public places I and about 13.500.000 
TV sets. Not counting 13,500,000 TV 
homes — even though this short-changes 
radio substantially — the NBC research 
department updated the 1949 Broad- 
<asl Mcasuicmcnl Bureau figures to 
show this enormous potential audience 
among radio-only homes this fall: 

NBC. >a\ NBC researchers, will 
reach a total of 22,921,000 radio-onl) 
homes; CBS— 20,656,000 ; ABC— 16,- 
673,000; MBS— 14.080.000. 



44 



SPONSOR 




Q. Counting the 13,500,000 TV 
homes, what is the potential cir- 
culation of the four networks? 

A. Updating the BMB figures, a Niel- 
sen study for CBS shows this break- 
down of daytime and nighttime circu- 
lation : 

Nighttime: CBS— 30,972,700; NBC 

- 30,077,300; ABC - - 26,007,300; 
MBS— 23,972,300. 

Daytime: CBS — 30,443,600; NBC 

- 28,774,900; ABC -- 26,007,300; 
MBS— 26,048,000. 



Q. What's the average audience 
you can reach on the four net- 
works? 

A. This fall, according to NBC re- 
search, the average network half-hour 
evening program will reach 8,200.000 
people. To match this delivered circu- 
lation, you would have to buy a 500- 
line ad in every daily newspaper in 
every city of the U. S. of 100.000 or 
over population. This advertisement in 
222 newspapers in 92 cities would pro- 
duce 8,200.000 noters. 

A more precise network breakdown 



was made by Nielsen for CBS: 

Average nighttime audiences: CBS 

—4,442,000 families; NBC— 3,478,000 

families; ABC— 2,388,000; MBS— 1,- 

928,000. 

Average daytime audiences: CBS — 

2,556,000 families; NBC— 2,011,000 

families; ABC 1,341,000; MBS— 1,- 

592.000. 



Q. How many stations on each 
full network will be able to car- 
ry your program this fall? 

A. NBC has now 168 stations on its 
full U. S. network; CBS— 180 (197 
counting those outside the U. S.) ; 
ABC— 249; MBS— 545. 



Q. How does the radio network 
delivered audience stack up 
against other media? 

A. Badio. with ils «)(>', coverage of 
the United States, is still the Goliath 
towering over other media. Thus, a 
half-hour average program on a net- 
work. October to December 1051. 
would deliver you an audience of 8,- 



200.000 homes; the same average pro- 
gram on TV 6,003,000 people; Satur- 
day Evening Post will deliver 4,415,- 
000; Life 5,509,000; and This Week 
7,149,000. 



Q. How does the acquisition of a 
TV set affect listenership to net- 
work radio? 

A. As pointed out in the Spot Radio 
section of this issue, people who buy 
TV sets actually listen more to day- 
time radio programs than those who 
own only radio sets. A stud) made 1>\ 
Pulse detailed in the Radio Basics sec- 
tion of ibis issue also shows a 17', 
increase in radio listening as the length 
of TV ownership grows through two 
vears. 



Q. What extra bonuses will net- 
work circulation offer you this 
fall? 

A. Network radio will hand out to the 
advertiser the bonanza of 19.000,000 
auto radio and 5.000,000 in public 



16 JULY 1951 



45 



TELEVISIO 





(OTHER 



1-. i 



Television's a wonder- child, no question about it. Precocious as 
anything, and big for its age. Almost makes you forget that tele- 
vision's got a big brother that can still lick anybody on the block. 

Or in the county, or in the country. For network radio is still 
the only medium that combines all advertising essentials: nation- 
wide coverage, thumping impact . . . and minimum cost. 

That's why the biggest producers of strongly competitive 
products (like drugs, foods and cigarettes) choose radio above 
all other media, and invest more money there than anywhere. 
And go on doing it, year after year. . . last year a 2.5% greater 
investment than the year before. 

They do this because they know that radio effectively reaches 
America's total market, through 96 million radio sets. And because 
in spite of all competition, radio continues to grow. (Last year 
alone there were more new radio sets manufactured— over 14H> 
million— than television's total accumulation of some 12} 2 million. ) 

Just as consistently as these big advertisers turn to radio, 
they turn to CBS, investing last year 14.8% more than ever be- 
fore; 17.3% more than on any other network. 

The reasons . . . 

15 OF THE 20 MOST POPULAR PROGRAMS ARE ON CBS — the bell- 
wethers of radio, that bring more listeners to all programs. 

MORE PEOPLE LISTEN TO CBS: nighttime audiences average 25% 
larger than the second network; daytime audience 2 r ,% larger. 
THEY LISTEN MORE OF THE TIME TO CBS : 31 % of all nighttime 
network listening is to CBS (29% to the second-place network). 
(And in rural areas and small toivns the CBS habit is even 
stronger: 41%-to 30% for the second-place network.) 
THEY REACH PEOPLE AT LOWER COST ON CBS: $1.18 per thou- 
sand, best buy of all the networks. (Ayid to buy that thousand in 
leading magazines would cost $2.72. And in newspapers, $U.08.) 
The big advertisers know better than anybody that you don't 
send a boy to do a man's work. When there's a big job to be 
done, you'll want radio . . . and CBS. 

THE CBS RADIO NETWORK 

Nielsen Family and Cost data, Oct. 1950-Feb. 1951; Hooper Audience Composition. 



places — neither considered in the Niel- 
sen count. Network radio will also 
offer coverage in the 37 ( /c of Ameri- 
can homes out of reach of TV stations. 
Still another consideration is the con- 
tinuing growth of the radio audience. 
In 1950. Americans bought 14,000,000 
new radio sets — or 40% more than in 
1949. In other words, in a year of 
TV's greatest expansion, radio outsold 
TV sets two to one — and almost equal 
to the entire number of TV sets that 



will be in use this fall, namely 13,500,- 
000 total video sets. 



Network radio business 



Q. What's the business outlook on 
the four networks for this fall? 

A. If trends continue as they now are, 
business for CBS and Mutual will be 
on the increase, while that for NBC 



HOW ON EARTH 
DO YOU DO IT? 



How can an independent AM 
radio station pull such a huge audi- 
ence against all major network com- 
petition? That's a familiar question 
to WIRC, but always a good one 
. . . because our 42.6% average 
share-ol-audience delivers more lis- 
teners per dollar than any other 
competing station. In fact. WIRC 
delivers this multitude of loyal, re- 
sponsive, money-spending Carolina 
Tar Heels at costs as low as 24.6 
cents per thousand. 

I nbelievable? No . . . not when 
you see our 1950 audience survey 
report and accompanying cost-per- 
thousand listeners breakdown, the 
latest data available on our S267.5 
million market . . . with 114,866 
radio homes. 

But. HOW do we do it? Well, 
it's simple, though not easy. It's 
with PROGRAMMING -- the kind 
of tailor-made, sparkling, imagina- 
tive programming that requires 
hard work from everyone on 
WlHC's smart staff. Major ingredi- 
ents: on-the-spot area news cover- 
age thrice daily to supplement the 
\P: the music most Tar Heels want 
to hear WHEN they want it. and 
such fascinating live shows as 
"Swap Shop," "Woman's World," 
'Stork Chili" and "Lillie \nne." 
which feature- a picturesque girl 
hillbillv ilis:- jockey. 

We (hi it with coverage, too. A 
combination of frequency (630) 



and power ( 1,000) gives us the 
strongest station between Charlotte 
and Winston-Salem on one side, and 
Asheville on the other. After you've 
bought those three markets, you still 
have a hole between them. But. 
WIRC can fill the gap. and fill it 
completely and effectively. Com- 
pletely with our dominating signal 
strength . . . and effectively with 
our commonsense programming, 
which results in proven audience. 

When you're buying a schedule 
in North Carolina, you might not 
even consider Hickory as a market 
in itself. Hickory, however, is just 
a "jumping off place" for WIRC. 
Our primary signal blankets 9 coun- 
ties, a large part of which cannot 
be effectively covered by any other 
station. Asheville. Winston-Salem 
and Charlotte are all within our 0.1 
mv/m contour, plus healthy seg- 
ments of Virginia, Tennessee and 
South Carolina. So, we suggest you 
buy good stations in Charlotte. Win- 
ston-Salem and Asheville; then add 
WIRC for a small additional amount 
of money. Thus, your coverage pic- 
ture of Piedmont and Western 
North Carolina is absolutely, geo- 
graphically complete, without any 
holes in your primary, intense cov- 
erage picture. 

Our Representative, Joseph Her- 
shev McGillvra. Inc.. will be glad to 
tell you more about WIRC. serving 
North Carolina's Piedmont from 
strategically-located Hickory. 



and ABC will be down compared to 
last fall's trade. Here's how network 
gross time billings for the first five 
months of 1951 stack up: 

Network Billing + or — 1950 

CBS $33,060,678 +9. 97c 

NBC $25,260,893 -8.8% 

ABC $14,582,390 -12.07c 

MBS $7,668,217 +3.27o 

(Source of above figures: Publish- 
ers Information Bureau "loss billings.) 



Q. How does network business 
compare with that in past years? 

A. Except for CBS, business has defi- 
nitely been on the downgrade. In 
1950, network net time sales were 
$121,600,000— more than $7,000,000 
below the level of 1949. In terms of 
gross time billings, the total for all 
four networks in 1950 was $183,400,- 
000— $4,400,000 less than that for 
1949. The downward trend is reflect- 
ed in this listing of the gross time bill- 
ings of the four webs since 1947: 



Year 


CBS 


NBC 


1950 


$70,744,669 


$61,397,650 


1949 


63,403,583 


64,013,296 


1948 


62,265,105 


69,697,590 


1947 


59,250,964 


65,756,517 


Year 


ABC 


MBS 


1950 


$35,124,624 


$16,091,977 


1949 


42,342,854 


18,040,596 


1948 


44,304,245 


22,728,802 


1947 


43,550,144 


22,372,711 



t The above figures are from the 
Publishers Information Bureau. I 



Q. How many sponsors are sched- 
uled to be on the radio networks 
this fall and how many programs 
will they sponsor? 

A. According to an estimate made for 
sponsor by James M. Boerst, editor of 
The Factuary, based on new fall busi- 
ness announced and network schedul- 
ing as of 25 June, there will be 125 
sponsors this fall. They will sponsor 
205 programs, and the business will 
be placed through a total of 78 adver- 



Q. How does this stack up with 
"The Factuary" records of spon- 
sorship in past years? 
A. It shows a continuing decline, ac- 
cording to The Factuary records. In 
the fall of 1950. 129 advertisers spon- 
sored 207 programs via 80 ad agen- 
cies. And in the fall of 1949, 132 ad- 
vertisers sponsored 226 programs via 
82 ad agencies. 



4K 



SPONSOR 



Mr. 1fm*-iWft 



WOULD YOU IGNORE 



500.000 <„ 



STOMERS 



(In Western New York, don't forget the "forgotten" fringe areas!) 



For Example: 

In the BMB primary coverage area of 
WHAM, there are over 121,000 radio 
homes with over 434,000 people who do 
not have access to any television service! 
And WHAM is the only Rochester radio 
station that covers this area! 




NEW YORK 



PENNSYLVANIA 



When you're selling by radio and TV in 
Western New York, don't forget the "for- 
gotten" fringe area that has over 434,000 
people. Clear Channel, 50,000-watt WHAM 
is the station throughout this area— and there 
is no television service available to these 
people as yet! To reach them, use radio, 
use WHAM! 



LEGEND 



^ Covered by WHAM and WHAM-TV 



Covered by WHAM and by Syracuse 
or Buffalo television 



Covered by WHAM radio but not 
covered adequately (if at all!) by 
any television and not reached by 
any other Rochester radio station! 





HAM 



The Stromberg-Carkon 
Station 

ROCHESTER 3, N. Y. 



50,000 WATTS 

16 JULY 1951 



CLEAR CHANNEL 



GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

49 



KECK 

Dial "920" 




FIRST in Permian Basin 
in Coverage 
in Listeners-Conlan 
survey year in and year 

out in Local Sports 
in Nation's Richest Market 

Fastest Growing Market in the 
U. S. Supply center for over 
25,000 Producing Oil Wells in 
Permian Basin 

HOME of the World's Largest 
Carbon Black Plant 

HOME of the Second largest 
Trucking Center in the State 

Effective Buying Power — $1,470 
per capita 

Blankets --18 Counties in West 
Texas — 3 in New Mexico 

Radio Homes— 63,610 in the half 
millivolt area in West Texas 

"It costs less than .07 to reach 
1,000 homes in KECK's primary 
area. 

Auto registry — first 6 months — 
60,856 

Population— 234,500 

Total Sales— 232,675,000 

Total General Food Sales — 
$49,622,000 

Sources — Standard Rate and Data 1950- 
1951 Consumers' Market 

MEMBER N. A. B. 

1000 Watts-D 
Nondirectional 

500 Watts-N-Directional 
Ben Ncdow, 

Owner and General Manager 

National Representative 

FORJOE AND COMPANY, INC. 

19 West 44th Street, New York 18, N. Y 

KECK 

ODESSA, TEXAS 

Your Best Buy in Radio 



Network radio costs 



Q. What's the main outlook for 
network radio costs this fall? 

A. So far as national advertisers are 
concerned, the outlook has never 
looked so attractive. While newspa- 
per, magazine and TV rates have con- 
tinued to soar, radio rates on all the 
four webs will be reduced by 10% to 
15', this fall. 



Q. What will be some typical 
gross network rates this fall? 

A. Here are some typical random 
rates: After 2 August, the gross for a 
full evening hour on 168 stations of 
NBC will be $25,115; this compares 
with the $27,785 you would have had 
to pay for a full-hour evening last fall. 
The rate for a 30-minute evening pro- 
gram on NBC on the full network 
would be 60% of an evening hour — or 
$15,000. The current gross network 
rates for ABC. based on evening hour 
class A time on a network of 282 sta- 
tions are: for 15 minutes. $11,868; 
for 30 minutes. $17,800; for a full 
hour, $29,670. 



Q. How will network radio's cost 
per-thousand circulation stack up 
against other media this fall? 

A. Network radio will still give you 
the lowest cost-per-thousand audience. 
This fall, according to NBC, the aver- 
age network radio evening sponsor will 
be buying listeners at the rate of four 
for one cent — $2.38 per thousand to 
be exact. Life's cost-per-thousand on 
a comparable basis will be 34'v high- 
er; Saturday's Evening Post's 23% 
higher; This Week's 40%; and TV's 
54'r higher. In other words, Life's 
cost-per-thousand will be $3.18; Sat- 
urday Evening Post's. $2.93; This 
Week's, $3.34; TV's, $3.67. 

Q. How has network radio's cost- 
per-thousand in terms of dollars 
risen over the years relative to oth- 
er media? 

A. In the face of steeply rising costs, 
according to CBS, network radio has 
increased its cost-per-thousand least of 
all media. Since 1946, United States 
wholesale prices have increased by 
65'/ ; the cost-per-thousand for eight 
big magazines by 47% ; for 94 big city 
uewspapers b\ 24%; nighttime ra- 
dios-cost-pcr-thousand onl\ b\ 10' ,. 



Q. What's the cost-per-thousand 
families for each of the four net- 
works? 

A. According to a study made by 
Nielsen for CBS from October, 1950 
to January 1951. thev stack up this 
way: CBS— $2.48 per 1,000 families; 
Mutual— $2.90; NBC— $3.16; ABC— 
$3.85. 



Q. Are any future rate cuts loom- 
ing for the four webs? 

A. Its hard to predict this one, of 
course; but spokesmen for the radio 
webs say definitely not. Typical was 
the response sponsor received from an 
ABC executive: "It is the opinion at 
ABC that radio rates definitely are not 
going down, and that as interest is re- 
newed in the medium, it will be possi- 
ble to restore them to former levels." 
Advertisers themselves canvassed by 
sponsor say they would not like to 
see network radio reduced to a cheap 
bargain-basement medium. With rates 
stabilized following the recent rate re- 
ductions, the chances are that sponsors 
will renew their confidence in the ra- 
dio network medium. In the long- 
range view, some veteran broadcasters 
continue to insist that the time will 
come when there will only be two great 
networks in business offering substan- 
tially reduced rates. 



Network radio 
programs 

Q. What will be the newest de- 
velopments in network radio this 
fall? 

A. \ ou can expect broadcasters to ex- 
pend more originality in devising 
shows with a fresh twist. Quizzes and 
mammoth give-aways will be on the 
downgrade (as witness Ralph Ed- 
wards' Truth or Consequences, which 
Philip Morris recently cancelled on 
both AM and TV). 

Experimentation will be the order of 
the day. CBS is reported to be inau- 
gurating a series of six evening half- 
hour programs, The Nation's Night- 
mare, dealing with crime in America. 
ABC is said to be preparing a new 
type of daytime serial to bolster slip- 
ping soap opera — Westerns for wom- 
en, on the order of The Virginian, star- 
ring Bruce Cabot. NBC is inaugurat- 
ing a traveling hillbilly radio show, 
Uncle Tom. designed to showcase ama- 



50 



SPONSOR 



WGN is your So*tu& Suy in Chicago/ 

If you're buying any other station in Chicago 
you are losing a great bonus audience. 

WGN reaches 260,100 more homes one or more 
times a week than the next station in the daytime.* 

WGN reaches 302,750 more homes one or more 
times a week than the next station in the nighttime.* 

i 

fifyocie it 0-Ut...\n 13 weeks WGN delivers a Bonus Audience 

the size of the city of Chicago. 



*1949 BMB 



A Clear Channel Station . . . 
Serving the Middle West 



V^ 



Chicago 11 
Illinois 

50,000 Watts 

720 
OnYourDial 




MBS 



Eastern Sales Office: 220 East 42nd Street. New York 17. N. Y. 

West Coast Representatives: Keenan and Eickelberg 

235 Montgomery St.. San Francisco 4 • 638 So. Van Ness Ave., Los Angeles 5 

710 Lewis Bldg.. 333 SW Oak St.. Portland 4 



16 JULY 1951 



51 



teur folk talent from various parts of 
the country. NBC will be offering Di- 
mension X, a half-hour science fiction 
drama. 



Q. What type of programs will be 
most sought after this fall? 

A. For a complete list of radio net- 
work availabilities, see page 54. By and 
large, the accent this fall will be on 
those type of programs that radio can 
do best — news, drama (especially mys- 
teries) and music. Also, the programs 
will be tailored for the shortest possi- 



ble time slots — half hour or five min- 
utes. Except for The Big Show (which 
is really three pyramided half-hour 
programs), programs of an hour or 
more will be on the decline. As mat- 
ters now stand, The Big Show will be 
back. 

Sharply reflecting the trend toward 
news programs was the comment 
sponsor received from a Mutual 
spokesman: "Since June, 1950, we've 
practically doubled our news coverage. 
The Bab-0 Reporter has entered our 
network to saturate the nation with 
daytime news for housewives; Lucky 



a SOUTH HAVEN 




KALAMAZOO 






MICHIGAN 











LIMA 



N 



• INDIANAPOLIS 



o 

x 
O 



WSBT 



SELLS A MARKET THAT'S UP 



The South Bend-Mishawaka trading area, always a rich and 

resj sive market, is UP. Tliis is the heart of the primary 

area that WSBT saturates — with listener ratings above net- 
work averages. The primary area is up iii population from 
I. !"> 77, <)()() to 1,798,000. Up in annual retail sales from 
$1,435,547,000 to $1,597,850,000 ... In this important 
sales area, WSBT is the besl loved voice — and the ONLY 
voice thai covers the entire market, lor bonus coverage, 
bonus listenership, bonus sales, it's WSBT the bonus buy! 

PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 




SOOQ 



Strike has just bought two news 
shows; Mutual State Farm Insurance 
has bought into news. The demand 
has so increased that we've recently 
added H. R. Baukhage to our stable 
of news commentators." 

In the same vein was the announce- 
ment of Henry Cassidy, NBC's news 
and special events director, that the 
web had sold five additional news pro- 
grams to sponsors since the first of 
the year. Latest sponsored program is 
the five-minute, five-times a week se- 
ries of Kenneth Banghart for Lucky 
Strike. Other news sponsors entering 
NBC are Mutual of Omaha with Bob 
Considine; Raytheon Manufacturing 
with John Cameron Swayze; Norwich 
Pharmacal with Robert Trout; Ameri- 
can Dairy Association with David 
Lawrence. You can also expect a 
stronger sponsor interest in news-mag- 
azines-of-the-air, of the order of CBS's 
Hear It Now and NBC's Voices and 
Events. 

The trend toward shorter programs 
is emphasized by several recent spon- 
sorships. General Mills recently con- 
tracted to sponsor a five-minute ABC 
program — Storyteller, starring Edward 
Arnold. On MBS, American Tobacco 
Company is sponsoring a new pro- 
gram of the same length — Talk Back, 
with the comedian, Happy Felton. 



Advertising billings 



Q. Who are the top 10 radio net- 
work advertisers? 

A. The top 10 network advertisers 
from January to December 1950 were 
as follows, according to rank order 
with their total billings: (1) Procter 
& Gamble, $15,551,752; (2) Miles 
Laboratories, $7,892,701; (3) General 
Mills, $7,820,752; (4) General Foods, 
$7,596,216; (5) Sterling Drugs, $7,- 
591,040; (6) Lever Brothers, $6,826,- 
149; (7) Campbell Soup Company, 
$5,733,819; (8) Liggett & Myers To- 
bacco Company, $5,217,562; (9) 
American Home Products, $5,150,884; 
(10) Philip Morris Company, $4,629,- 
105. 



Q. What product groups will be 
the heaviest advertisers on net- 
work radio this fall? 

A. The pattern is reflected in the gross 

network time bought from January to 

i Please turn to page 55) 



52 



SPONSOR 




V 



In Northern California 
MORE PEOPLE LISTEN -more often -to KNBC 

than to any other radio station 



KNBC's 50,000 watt Non-Directional transmitter 
reaches all the markets of Northern California . . . 

KNBC has the biggest and most loyal audience in 
the San Francisco-Oakland Metropolitan Market — the 
seventh largest, fastest-growing major market in America. 

And as a plus, KNBC penetrates all the rich, fast-growing markets 
throughout Northern California. PLUS markets like Stockton- 
Modesto, Ukiah-Mendocino, Napa-Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz-Monterey, 
Sacramento, San Jose-Santa Clara, and Eureka-Humholdt County. 

ONLY KNBC can reach all these markets — in one, big 
economical package. KNBC sales reps will show you how. .. 

KNBC delivers MORE PEOPLE (in one pack- 
age!)— at LESS COST per thousand — than any 
other advertising medium in Northern California. 



M 




PLUS-Morket Case History 
Eureka-Humboldt County 

• Population -68,548, an increase of 49.6% 
from 1940-1950 

• Effective Buying lncome*-$96, 950,000, an 
increase of 155.6% 

• Retail Sales - -$76,790,000, up 215.5% 

• KNBC Audience — Week after week, over 
half of the radio families listen regularly 
to KNBC 

*Sales Management's 1951 Survey of Buying Power 



Northern California's NO. 1 Advertising Medium 



50,000 Watts -680 K.C. 



San Francisco 



Represented by NBC Spot Sales 



16 JULY 1951 



53 



Xrailabl*' network packitge programs (radio) 



TITLE 






TYPE 


APPEAL 


NET 


T 


ME 


PRICE 


TESTED 


EXPLANATION 


AFFAIRS OF PETER SALEM 


Mystery 


Family 


MBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$1,750 


yes 


Private Eye 


AMAZING MR. MALONE 


Mystery 


Family 


NBC 


30 mill. 


l/wk 


$2,941 


yes 


Quick-thinking lawyer solves murders 


AMERICAN FORUM OF THE 


A 


R 


Discussion 


Adult 


NBC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$2,352 


yes 


Issues cf the day discussed by experts 



ARCHIE ANDREWS 



BIG JON & SPARKIE 



THE BIG SHOW 



BOBBY BENSON 



BOBBY BENSON & B-BAR-B RIDERS 



BREAK THE BANK 



BROADWAY'S MY BEAT 
CECIL BROWN 



CALIFORNIA CARAVAN 



CAPITOL CLOAKROOM 



MINDY CARSON SHOW 



CBS FARM NEWS 



CBS SPORTS ROUNDUP 



CHANCE OF A LIFETIME 



COMEDY OF ERRORS 



COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO 



CRIME FIGHTERS 



CRIME PHOTOGRAPHER 



DANCING PARTY 



DANGEROUS ASSIGNMENT 



DIMENSION X 



DIXIELAND BREAKFAST CLUB 



EARN YOUR VACATION 



ENCHANTED HOUR 



FAMILY CIRCLE 



THE FAT MAN 



FOREIGN REPORTER 



THE FOUR 



Situation Comedy Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$2,941 



Teen age hi-jinx 



30 min, 5/wk 



$2,250 



Trials & tribulations of 'Sparkle' 



Variety 



Family 



90 min. l/wk 



$8,820 per yi hr. 



T. Bankhead and top show biz names 



5 min. 2/wk 



$300 each 



Western — music 



Juvenile 



Quiz 



Family 



Family 



Family 



Family 



Science Fiction 



Family 



News 



Family 



30 min. 2/wk 



$1,250 each 



Western adventures of 12 yr. old boy 



30 min, 5/wk 



$1,735 



Quiz with cash awards 



CBS 



30 min. l/wk 



$4,125 



Detective tales with Broadway background 



15 min. 5/wk 



$650 each 



Commentator 



Drama 


Drama 


MBS 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$1,700 


yes 


Historical dramatization 


News 


Adult 


CBS 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$1,275 


yes 


Prominent statesman interviewed on current subject 


Music 


Family 


NBC 


15 
15 


min. 
min. 


2/wk 
3/wk 


$2,940 
$4,117 


yes 


Mindy sings in her informal style 


News 


Rural 


CBS 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


$950 


yes 


Agricultural news items of interest 


Sports 


Family 


CBS 


15 


mill 


l/wk 


$925 


yes 


Sports events of the week and human interest items 


Audience Partlc. 


Family 


ABC 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,500 


yes 


Alphabet game 


Quiz 


Family 


MBS 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,000 


yes 


Audience participation 


Adventure 


Family 


MBS 


30 


nun 


l/wk 


$1,500 


yes 


Cloak and dagger 


Mystery 


Family 


MBS 


25 


min. 


l/wk 


$1,500 


yes 


Salute to law enforcers 


Drama 


Adult 


CBS 


30 


min, 


l/wk 


open 


yes 


Newspaper cameraman tales 


Music 


Family 


ABC 


2 


irs. 


l/wk 


$8,000 


yes 


2 hours of music with 5 different orchs. 



30 min. l/wk 



$4,117 



Brian Donlevy as world-wide adventurer 



30 min. l/wk 



$2,971 



Suspenseful adventures in time and space 



Variety 




Family 


MBS 


;n 


min. 


5/wk 


$300 


yes 


Dixieland music by instrumental quintet 




Quiz 




Family 


CBS 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$3,950 


yes 


Vacation trips for prizes 




Music 




Family 


MBS 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$1,200 


yes 


Concert music with 35-piece orch. 




Drama 




Family 


CBS 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$4,000 


yes 


Adventure stories by top writers 




Audience 


Partic. 


Family 


ABC 


60 


min. 


l/wk 


$6,000 


yes 


Walter Kiernan, M.C. 




Drama 




Family 


ABC 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$3,785 


yes 


Mystery-detective 





- 



15 min. l/wk 



$450 



yes Top news story of the week 



30 min. l/wk 



Stories of mystery and intrigue with top-rank movie stai 



I Please turn to page 58 



WDB0 



YOUR GREATEST SELLING POWER 
. . .in Centhal JloAida 



Orlando's Pioneer Radio Station Est. 1924 

ORLANDO, FLORIDA 
580 K. C. 5000 WATTS 

WDBO-FM 92 MCS 35000 WATTS 

Columbia Broadcasting System 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: BLAIR, CUMMINGS 



1950 Retail Sales in the 21 WDBO counties totaled 

#582,687,000*. 

WDBO has approximately 19,000 more daytime 

families and 17,000 more nighttime families who 

listen regularly (6 or 7 days or nights a week) 

than the other 3 Orlando stations combined**. 

The same report shows WDBO's gain over the 

previous report is 20% — and rates have not been 

increased! 

*1951 Sales Management **Current BMB Report 



54 



SPONSOR 






December last year 1>\ these top prod- 
uct groups in ranking order: ( 1 ) Food 
products, $44,000,000: 1 21 Toiletries 
and toilet goods, $25,000,000; 131 
Drugs, $24,000,000; (4) Tobaccos, 
$22,000,000; (5) Soaps, polishes and 
cleansers. $20,000,000; (6) Gasoline 
and lubricants, $5,500,000; 1 7) Autos 
and auto parts, $5,000,000. 



Trend toward 
flexibility 



Q. Is there a trend toward using 
network radio on a semi-spot ba- 
sis? 

A. There is. and despite protests from 
stations and reps there probably will 
be more of it. In an effort to lure cus- 
tomers, the webs are increasingly infil- 
trating into the field of spot radio. The 
objective is to convince the sponsor 
that he can fuse the advantages of both 
local and regional announcements with 
that of mass network coverage. 

One example of network flexibility 
is Trans World Airline's sponsorship 
this past season of the NBC comedy se- 
ries Mr. and Mrs. Blandings, starring 
Cary Grant and Betsy Drake. The first 
two commercials are broadcast over all 
61 of the NBC stations. The third com- 
mercial, though, is split, a local cut-in 
offering a strictly local plug going out 
via 24 stations; the remaining 37 sta- 
tions carry a general TWA message. 

Another example is P&G's sponsor- 
ship of the NBC daytime show, Wel- 
come Travelers. On this program. 
P&G has sold Spic and Span and Lava 
Soap in every state of the union. But 
they have also used the same show to 
sell four other products on a regional 
basis. Nobody living in New York 
hears commercials for Cheer, since 
that product can't even be bought in 
New York. While Cheer is being sold 
in New England and Texas. Prell is 
being sold in Florida and Montana. 
Thus, with network radio, the sponsor 
is helped in matching his commercials 
to his marketing needs in various sec- 
tions of the country. 

Q. What's the outlook in network 
"announcement-participation "ad- 
vertising? 

A. ^ ou can expect more of this type 

of invasion into the spot radio field. 

too. The most striking example was 

(Please turn to page 60 I 




THERE'S A nT|7 
100 MILLION MARKET 
ON THE MAP OF NEW YORK! 



No TV outlet in 

Elmira ! 

WENY sells listeners 
in this busy market 
at the lowest available cost per thou- 
sand. (Combined Average Share of 
Audience: 60% at latest Hooper.) 

WENY 

NBC in Elmira, N. Y. 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY ELMIRA STAR-GAZETTE, INC. 



REPRESENTATIVES Everelt-McKinney, Inc. Lee F. OConncll Co. 

N..« York -Chicago lo% Argeles Sal I 





16 JULY 1951 



55 



DON if e delivers more tfr 



Nielsen's figures show that Don Lee 
*daytime audiences are up 16% 
^nighttime audiences are up 17% 

*( first quarter of 1951 vs. first quarter of 1949, full network average audience) 

Don Lee is a bigger, better advertising medium today than ever 
No other advertising medium of any kind can deliver your 
sales message to as many people as often from their own 
local major selling medium (with all the local influence and 
prestige) at as low a cost per sales impression as Don Lee. 

The above is a BIG statement, but Don Lee is a BIG 
selling medium with 45 stations in 45 important Pacific 
Coast markets. Only Don Lee was especially designed 
to consistently sell all the Pacific Coast. That's 
why Don Lee consistently broadcasts more regionally 
sponsored advertising than any other network on 
the Pacific Coast. Don Lee delivers MORE and the 
advertisers who sell the Pacific Coast know it. 

17/ Don Lee affiliates have increased power and/or improved frequency 
during the past year and a half. 




willet H. brown, President ■ ward D. incrim, Vice-President in Charge of Sales 
1313 north vine STREET, Hollywood 28, California • Represented Nationally by JOHN BLAIR & company 



yone else on ihe ?ac$c Const 




he Nation's Greatest Regional Network 



Available network package programs { radio) 



{Continued from page 5-lf 



GIRL FROM PARIS 



GIVE AND TAKE 



GRANBYS GREEN ACRES 



HELEN HALLS FEMME FAIR 



HASHKNIFE HARTLEY 



HAWAII CALLS 



GABRIEL HEATTER 



AL HELFER'S SPORTS DIGEST 



HERE'S FRANK SINATRA 



HERMAN HICKMAN 



HIDDEN TRUTH 



HOLLYWOOD STAR PLAYHOUSE 



ROBERT HURLEIGH 



I LOVE A MYSTERY 



INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 
ITS HIGGINS. SIR 



PETE KELLY'S BLUES 



LADIES FAIR 



HAWK LARRABEE 



LARRY LESUEUR 



THE LINEUP 



TED MACK FAMILY HOUR 



MAGNIFICENT MONTAGUE 



MAKE BELIEVE TOWN 



MAN CALLED X 



MEET MILLIE 



MEET THE BOYS 



MR. & MRS. BLANDINGS 



«R. MOTO 



MUCH ABOUT DOOLITTLE 



MURDER BY EXPERTS 



MUTUAL NEWSREEL 



MYSTERIOUS TRAVELER 



NEWSSTAND THEATER 



THE NEW THEATER 



NIGHTBEAT 



NO SCHOOL TODAY 



OFFICIAL DETECTIVE 



THE OLD ARMY GAME 



JANE PICKENS PARTY 



POOLE'S PARADISE 



PURSUIT 



Q E D 



QUEEN FOR A DAY 



RADIO REPORTER'S SCRATCHPAD 



RATE YOUR MATE 



REPORT FROM OVERSEAS 
ROCKY JORDAN 



LANNY ROSS 



THE SAINT 



FRANCES SCULLY SHOW 



THE SEA HOUND 



THE SHADOW 



APPEAL 
Family 



NET 
NBC 



TIME 
15 min. l/wk 



EXPLANATION 



$1,738 



yes Jane Morgan sings French songs 



Quiz 


Family 


CBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$2,700 


yes 


John Reed King asks the questions (daytime) 


Comedy 


Family 


CBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$6,200 


yes 


Inexperienced farmer's comic adventures 


News 


Female 


MBS 


15 min. 


l/wk 


$200 


yes 


Feminine viewpoint 


Adventure 


Family 


MBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$1,800 


yes 


Western justice 


Music 


Family 


MBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$1,400 


yes 


Hawaiian music 



Family 



15 min. 5/wk 
when avail. 



$1,500 per show 
plus news charge 
and anncr. 



yes Commentator 



Sports 



15 min. l/wk 



$500 



Inside news of sports 



Variety 


Family 


CBS 


1 hr. 


/wk 


$1,500 


per 


qtr 


yes 


"The Voice" sings, plays records and chats 




Sports 


Family 


NBC 


15 min 


l/wk 


$1,294 






yes 


Sports anecdotes by Yale coach 




Mystery 


Family 


MBS 


30 min 


l/wk 


$2,085 






yes 


Lie detector solves crimes 




Drama 


Family 


ABC 


30 min 


l/wk 


$5,000 






yes 


Top Hollywood stars in suspense dramas 




Aud. Partic. 


Family 


CBS 


30 mill. 


l/wk 


$3,925 






yes 


Audience participation 




News 


Family 


MBS 


15 min 


5/wk 


$650 each 




yes 


Commentator 





Family 



15 min. 5/wk 



$2,500 (for 5) 
$750 each 



Modern buccaneers 



Family 



MBS 



25 min. l/wk 



$1,750 



Drama — experiences of airline passengers 



Situation Comedy Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$4,175 



Harry McNaughton as English butler 



Music&Adventure Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$5,500 



Adventure and jazz of the roaring 20's 



Variety 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$3,750 



Walter Kiernan MX. 



Situation Comedy Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$6,209 



Monty Woolley as ex-Shakespearean actor 



Comedy 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$5,200 



Audrey Totter In star role 



Quiz 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$5,425 



Quiz from Armed Forces bases 



Situation Comedy Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$3,529 split net 



Cary Grant & Betsy Drake 



Mystery 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$3,529 



J. P. Marquand's famous Japanese detective 



Comedy 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$6,350 



Situation comedy 



Mystery 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$1,500 



Prize-winning crime stories 



Family 



15 min. 5/wk 



$3,500 for 5 



On the spot news 



Mystery 



Family 



MBS 



30 min. l/wk 



$1,650 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$2,500 



Stories from top magazines 



Family 



Family 



NBC 
NBC 



60 m n. l/wk 



$3,529 



Eva LeGallienne hostess 



30 min. l/wk 



$3,500 



Frank Lovejoy as demon reporter 



Qplz 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$7,000 



Comedy-quiz with Harvey Stone and musicians 



Music 



Family 



NBC 



Variety 



Family 



15 min. 5/wk 
55 min, 5/wk 



$2,882 



$1,000 5 qtr-hrs 



yes 
yes 



Jane Pickens with songs and Interviews 



Music and views 



CBS 



30 min. l/wk 



$4,400 



Tales of Scotland Yard 



Family 



ABC 



30 min. l/wk 



$2,500 



Literary panel solves hidden mysteries 



Variety 



Family 



30 min. 5/wk 



$1,800 for 3 



Audience participation 



Family 



CBS 



15 min. l/wk 



$975 



Tape recordings of news background material 



Quiz 



Family 



CBS 



30 min. l/wk 



$4,900 



Joey Adams and coupled contestants 



Family 



CBS 



15 min, l/wk 



$450 



News direct from various world centers 



Adult 



30 min. l/wk 



$4,500 



Adventure with George Raft 



30 min. l/wk 



$3,850 



Dramatizes world's outstanding love stories 



Variety 



Family 



MBS 



10 min. 5/wk 



$1,250 for 5 
w organ 



Vocalist — songs and patter 



Mystery 
Movies 



Family 



NBC 



30 min, l/wk 



$3,235 



yes Tom Conway as famous crook detective 



ABC 



15 min. 5/wk 



$850 



News from Hollywood 



Family 



Mystery 



Family 



ABC 
MBS 



30 min, l/wk 



$2,000 



Sea adventures 



30 min. I wk 



$4,000 



Invisible avenger 



Variety 


Female 


MBS 


25 min. 


5/wk 


$2,500 


for 5 


yes 


Audience participation quiz 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$3,650 




no 


Western adventure 


News 


Family 


CBS 


15 min. 


l/wk 


$950 




yes 


Analysis of week's news events 


Drama 


Adult 


CBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$5,000 




yes 


Original mysteries 


Situation Comedy 


Family 


NBC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$6,470 




no 


Edmund Gwenn & Spring Byington 



Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$3,400 


yes 


Stories with Hollywood background 


Mystery 


Family 


NBC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$5,294 


yes 


Herbert Marshall in international dramas 



Variety 


Children 


ABC 


2 hrs. 


l/wk 


$1,200 


yes 


Stories and entertainment for children 


Mystery 


Family 


MBS 


25 min. 


1 wk 


$1,500 


yes 


Documentaries from magazine files 



( Please turn to page 62 



FOR LOCAL LEVEL IMPACT 

Less than half of the nation lives in the metropolitan 
areas. In Small Town and Rural America, you will find 
more than half of the nation living— with more than half 
of the nation's purchasing power! The Keystone 
Broadcasting System has 450 stations with LOCAL 
LEVEL IMPACT to sell these people who need and buy 
the same necessities of life as those in metropolitan 
areas. 




BEYOND EFFECTIVE TELEVISION 



There are very few television sets in Small Town and 
Rural America— with little and unsatisfactory recep- 
tion. These people still depend upon their local radio 
station— and these stations, according to BMB studies 
enjoy higher listener-loyalty than distant metropolitan 
stations. National blue chip advertisers have already 
discovered that Keystone's 450 stations effective- 
ly and economically move their merchandise! 




IX SMALL TOWN AND RCRAL AMERICA 



For LOCAL LEVEL IMPACT, Keystone is the only 
national transcription network reaching Small Town 
and Rural America. These 450 stations can be pur- 
chased in one, low cost and attractive package— with 
only one order, one check and one performance affi- 
davit! Or buy only the number of stations needed to 
cover a selected area. 





NEW YORK: 580 FIFTH AVE. 

CHICAGO 




134 \. LaSALLE ST. 



KEYSTONE 

BROADCASTING 

SYSTEM inc. 



16 JULY 1951 



59 



WML 





This cutie's a smarty — she 
trusts in her ears, 

And buys only products about 
which she hears. 

The place that she turns to for 
this advice on Good buys 

is "The Voice of Toledo" and 
here are the "why's?" 

For Thirty Years WSPD has 
served her both daytime and 
night 

With Cood Programs, Good 
sponsors — we've done the 
job right. 

Buy Toledo's WSPD where a 
majority audience is always 
assured. 

So, if it's sales you are seeking, 
want your spots to be heard 




ABC, which offered P&G one-minute 
participation announcements in Stop 
The Music, in The Sheriff on Friday, 
and in certain evening five-minute 
news periods in sustaining ABC shows. 
Also expect an increasing number of 
network station affiliates and station 
lepresentatives to attack the webs for 
Indulging in this practice; perhaps 
even withdrawing from the webs if they 
don't stop it. A typical blast was that 
made by Edward Petry, president of 
Edward Petry & Company, in a recent 
speech before station operators. "The 
networks are jeopardizing some 50 r /f 
of your national spot volume for their 
own purposes," he warned. "They are 
robbing Peter to pay Paul. You're 
Peter. Guess who Paul is?" 



Q. What's the outlook in tandem- 
style network advertising? 

A. A spokesman for NBC told spon- 
sor that this fall definitely will see the 
continuation of its "Operation Tan- 
dem. ' This type of multiple sponsor- 
ship, of course, involves a number of 
advertisers sharing in the sponsorship 
of a series of web programs. Sponsors 
using it this past year include: Can- 
non Mills, Chesterfield, Whitehall 
Pharmacal, RCA. The tandem pro- 
grams have included: The Big Show, 
The Boston Pop Orchestra, Screen Di- 
rectors Playhouse, Duffy's Tavern, 
The Magnificent Montague. The same 
NBC spokesman said there will be 
some changes in the Tandem program 
lineup this fall, but he is fairly certain 
The Big Show will continue, largely 
because of the way it has hypoed in- 
terest in network radio. 



Q. Are all national networks 
linked by wires? 

A. No. The Keystone Broadcasting 
System is a transcription network of 
455 affiliated stations; 350 of them lo- 
cated in small town and rural America 
and generally outside TV areas. 

Advertisers can pinpoint their radio 
advertising with the utmost selectivity. 
By choosing a minimum of 80 stations, 
or more if he desires, the national ad- 
vertiser can select his market to sup- 
plement his TV coverage; or, even if 
he has a network radio show, he can 
add to his net coverage by means of 
Keystone, a transcription net not 
bound by wire tie-ups between stations. 



ONE OF 
AMERICA'S 

FINER 

STATIONS 



WBOC 

RADIO PARK-SALISBURY, MD. 



Crossley Survey: 
SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

77.1 % 

10:00 AM — 10:00 PM 
Monday thru Friday 

RADIO HOMES 
81,698 

RETAIL SALES 
$324,136,000 



WBOC 

RADIO PARK-SALISBURY, MD. 



MUTUAL NETWORK 

Representatives: 
Burn-Smith Co., Inc. 



60 



SPONSOR 



Merchandising by the stations is also 
adding to Keystone's advertiser ap- 
peal. 

Some 30 national advertisers are ex- 
pected to be using Keystone facilities 
this fall. Sidney J. Wolf, Keystone 
president, reports the net's growth: 
"Ten new major national accounts 
have been added since 1 January with 
the volume of business for the first 
half of the current year more than 
three times the billing for the first half 
of last year." 



Q. What is the status of the new- 
est national network? 

A. Liberty Broadcasting System, new- 
est of the nation's coast-to-coast webs, 
is growing. With a one station start in 
Dallas three years ago (KLIF) it grew 
to 60 to 70 stations last year; now 
claims affiliations with 411 outlets. 

Gordon McLendon, president of Lib- 
erty, started with re-creations of big 
league games. Now, sports, news and 
music highlight the programming 
available to advertisers. Sportswise, the 
net offers live and recreated games; a 
sports show featuring Mickey Rooney. 
News-wise, names like William L. 
Shirer, Joseph Harsch, and John W. 
Vandercook provide audience-building 
commentaries. Music in the Morgan- 
Manner brings Liberty listeners dance- 
able tunes. With this balanced fare, 
Liberty is attracting a host of national 
(General Mills, Lever Brothers, Fall- 
staff Brewing, U. S. Army Recruiting) 
and regional accounts. The outlook this 
fall: business up all along the line. 

There is no standard rate card. In- 
stead, population of the station city 
and retail sales in the station market 
are the index. 



Top agencies placing 
network business 



Q. What ad agencies place the 
most accounts in network radio? 

A. According to a study made for 
sponsor by Factuary, published by the 
Executives' Radio-TV Service, Larch- 
mont, N. Y., these are among the 20 
ad agencies that placed the largest 
number of accounts in network radio 
this past year (not in order of rank- 
ing) : Ted Bates; Batten, Barton, Dur- 



Personality Sells! 

RAHALL STATIONS HAVE "IT! 

Every Roholl Station is a definite personality in its community. By reason 
of their understanding of civic problems and listener preference, Rahall 
Stations deliver maximum advertising effectiveness. The people who listen 
to these stations live healthy lives in rich, industrial, farming and mining 
areas. Talk to them profitably through their favorite station for music, news 
and sports. 



1320 kc 1000 watts. Now broadcast- 
ing full time in Pennsylvania's fabulous 
Lehigh Valley — the home of the big 
tri-cities — Allentown, Bethlehem, 
Easton. FIRST in daytime pm listening. 
One of America's outstanding indepen- 
dent stations. 





1110 kc 500 watts. Serving you where 
the buying dollars are. Covering Mont- 
gomery county's large farming and in- 
dustrial area . . . and Philadelphia's 
rich suburban market. 





620 kc 1000 watts. The friendly 
personality voice of folks in West 
Virginia. "One Station" coverage in 
the heart of the rich coal regions and 
industrialized areas of Southern West 
Virginia. 



WKAP, 
WNAR, 
WWNR, 



**%0*2SS^ 



Allentown, Pa. — Oggie Davies, Manager WEED & CO. 

Norristown, Pa. — Joe Pace, Manager WALKER & CO. 

Beckley, W. Va. — Tom Dowds, Manager WALKER & CO. 

RAHALL STATIONS — JOE RAHALL, President 



w/J 



16 JULY 1951 



61 



tr«ii/<il>/<» network package programs (radio) 



[Continued from page 58j 



- 



SHORT STORY 



SINGING MARSHAL 



HOWARD K. SMITH 



SONGS FOR SALE 



SPACE PATROL 



SAM SPADE 



SPORTS PARADE 



JOHN STEELE. ADVENTURER 



SUNDAY WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP 



$C4 QUESTION 



TAKE A NUMBER 



TALES OF THE TEXAS RANGERS 



THE THREE OF US 



TROPICAL TRIP WITH DESI ARNAZ 



TRUE OR FALSE 



TWIN VIEWS OF THE NEWS 



UNDER ARREST 



UP FOR PAROLE 



VOICES AND EVENTS 



VANITY AND MRS. FAIR 



WAR FRONT-HOME FRONT 



WAR REVIEW 



WINNER TAKE ALL 



YOU CANT TAKE IT WITH YOU 



EXPLANATION 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$2,941 



Dramatizations of best short stories 



Adventure 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$1,250 



Western — adventure and song 



News 


Family 


CBS 


15 min. l/wk 


$950 


yes 


International news broadcast from London 


Variety 


Family 


CBS 


1 hr. l/wk 


$9,675 


yes 


Steve Allen and unpublished composers 



60 min. l/wk 



$1,200 



Futuristic drama for children 



Mystery 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$5,294 



Private eye adventure 



Sports 



30 min, l/wk 



$1,500 incl. orch. 



Guests for all sports-orchestra 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$1,500 



Human conflict 



Family 



NBC 



30 min. l/wk 



$5,294 



True adventures of famous police force 



Comedy 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$7,300 



Brother-in-law trouble 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$4,250 



Latin American music and qui; 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$1,500 



Audience participation 



Family 



15 min. l/wk 



$650 



Human interest 



Family 



30 min, l/wk 



$1,750 



Science — fiction 



Mystery 



Family 



30 min. l/wk 



$1,550 



Authentic case histories from police files 



30 min. l/wk 



$4,200 



Based on actual parole case 



News 



Family 



NBC 



30 min. l/wk 



$4,117 



Living record of week's news 



Comedy 



Family 



30 min. 



Family 



l/wk 
l/wk 



$7,000 



Woman executive in situation comedy 



$2,000 



Round-the-world news interviews 



Family 



15 min. l/wk 



$650 



Review of news by George Fielding Eliot 



Family 



30 min. 5/wk 



$3,750 



Bill Cullen. M.C. daytime 



Situation Comedy Family 



NBC 



30 min. l/wk 



$5,294 



Whimsical show starring Walter Brennan 



YOURS TRULY— JOHNNY DOLLAR 



30 min. l/wk 



$5,350 



Adventures of Insurance Investigator 



News 


Family 


CBS 


15 min. 


l/wk 


$1,225 


yes 


Worldwide on-the-spot news coverage 




Quiz 


Family 


NBC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$4,117 


yes 


Phil Baker poses puzzlers 


i 


Quiz 


Family 


MBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$1,500 


yes 


Audience participation 





KARK covers a broader area, with the 
largest audience, morning, afternoon 
and evening, at a lower cost per 
thousand families than any other 
Little Rock station! 




Furthermore — In these 42 counties 



FOOD STORE SALES 

totaled over 

$128 MILLION 

That's MORE than the combined total food store sales in 
Albany, N. Y., Salt Lake City, Utah, and Lansing, Michigan. 



and ■ 



DRUG STORE SALES 



totaled over 



$16 MILLION 

That's MORE than the combined total drug store sales in 
Trenton, N. )., Clendale, Calif., Tacoma, Wash., and 
Racine, Wise! 



plus 

KARK also delivers a BIC BONUS of 24 Arkansas counties 
and 3 Louisiana parishes at a 10-49° BMB level! 

Write us or phone your nearest Petry man for 
full details! 

TO SELL THE BEST PART OF ARKANSAS . . . 



BUY 



•BMB, 
Spring, 
1949 



All sales figures copr. 
1951 SALES MAN- 
AGEMENT Survey of 
Buying Power. 



T. K. BARTON. Cen'l Mr;. 
ULIAN F. HAAS. Comm'l MRr. 

National Representative 
EDWARD PETRY AND CO , INC. 




62 



"Pttfenncd Station 
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

SPONSOR 



stine & Osborn; Benton & Bowles; 
Biow ; Leo Burnett, Chicago; Cecil & 
Presbrey: Cunningham & Walsh; 
Compton : Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample ; 
William Fsty: Foote, Cone & Belding: 
Kudner; John R. Murray; Sullivan. 
Stauffer. Colwell & Bayles: J. Walter 
Thompson: Young & Rubicam. 



New web sponsors 



Q. What's the outlook in terms of 
new advertisers entering the radio 
webs? 

A. This will depend entirely on how r 
creative the salesmanship and promo- 
tional efforts of the webs turns out. 
During the past season, some new ad- 
vertisers have wet their feet in web ad- 
vertising, largely institutional type 
sponsors, and on a short-term scale. 
One example is the American Truck- 
ing Association, which bankrolled 
American Farm of the Air for a period 
of Sundays on NBC. Another is TWA, 
which made its debut into network ra- 
dio with sponsorship of NBC's Mr. 
and Mrs. Blandings. This fall, Syl- 
vania Electric Products, Inc., in an 
attempt to sell TV sets to the radio au- 
dience, will launch Sammy Kaye's Sun- 
day Serenade on ABC. and Grantland 
Rice's Sports Commentary on CBS. 
I Sylvania made its debut in broadcast 
advertising in the fall of 1950. squir- 
ing Game of the Week on ABC radio, 
now cancelled, and Beat the Clock on 
CBS-TV. still going strong.) 

Undoubtedly, the webs' best hope is 
to lure in advertisers who are introduc- 
ing new products to the public. The 
most striking illustration is Tintair. 
which plunged into network radio last 
year with the $7.5O0-a-week Frank Sin- 
atra Show and the $3.00()-a-week Som- 
erset Maugham Radio Theatre I also 
sponsor during this season of Somer- 
set Maugham TV Theatre and Sammy 
Levenson Show both CBS-TV, and the 
Cavalcade of Bands. Cavalcade of 
Stars on DuMont I . 

Some of the webs, reeling momen- 
tarily after a flock of pre-summer can- 
cellations, are heartened by recent new 
sales. CBS. for example, is encour- 
aged by the way Kingan & Company 
has signed for the Godfrey Digest, and 
Wildroot for FBI in Peace and War. 
Also, although Lever Brothers can- 
celled out My Friend Irma, Turns is re- 
ported to be dickering for this CBS 
comedv old-timer. 



MEN, MONEY, MOTIVES 

(Continued from page 10 I 

Probably it is true that there can be 
no slowdown in employment I the key 
index always) for three years to come. 
But paradise is not at hand. 
* * * 

Nor will, this time, soft psychology 
and lazy ways be protected. That's 
one reason why the "fall facts" for 
1951 are peculiarly significant. More 
competition for the advertiser's dollar, 



and higher-all-along-the-line media 
costs are "something new, something 
blue." Nor will any realistic, well-in- 
formed seller of time (or space i fail 
to understand that in the 10 vears 
since Pearl Harbor, the advertiser him- 
self has become very much more hard- 
boiled. It isn"t that he has lost faith 
in advertising. To the contrary. The 
moral is that he buys more intelligent- 
ly, more critically, not onl) on quan- 
tity (circulation I but quality I man- 
agement and poli< \ i . * * * 




— —"'„ ft 




WCH adds punch to campaigns with. 
Dealer and jobber newsletters, counter 
cards, window displays, billboards, news- 
paper and tradepaper ads, newsletters, in- 
person calls, spot announcements, audience 
direct mail, plus complete publicity and 
news release service. 

Advertisers know that PROMOTION IS A 
WCH EXTRA THAT COUNTS! 



5.000 WATTS - BASIC ABC 

NORFOLK - PORTSMOUTH - NEWPORT NEWS 

THE DAILY PRESS - TIMES HERALD STATION 

FREE and PETERS. INC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



16 JULY 1951 



63 



more New Englanders 
listen to ' 



n 




than an y other 
Rhode Island station 




TO REACH THE 
MOST BUYERS, 



weason after season, Hoopers Share of Radio 
Audience Reports show a dominant audience leader- 
ship for WPRO in the Providence-Pawtucket area — 
the nucleus of New England's SECOND LARGEST 
MARKET ... the 19th largest market in the 
United States. 



but, that's only HALF the story 



Another of America's major marketing areas, 
Fall River-New Bedford, Mass., relies on WPRO for 
its popular CBS and local programs. WPRO's power- 
ful 5000 watts on 630 kilocycles cover this eighth 
largest New England market with a signal greater 
than 2 millivolts. 



and, as a TEST MARKET 



. . . PROVIDENCE ranks FIRST in the New England- 
Middle Atlantic States area and FIFTH in the United 
States for cities of 250,000 to 500,000 population. 

I opr Sales Management. Nov. 10th issue, 1950. 




WPROn* 

PROVIDENCE- 630 KC5000W 



REPRESENTED BY RAYMER 




In tune with the times 

Spot radio billings continue to climb to new heights, despite 
scattered rate cuts and the influence of TV in some markets. 
Still the most flexible advertising medium available to the 
national sponsor, spot radio is busy. 

Program offerings continue to change. The availability 
picture needs constant revision, and rate structures are still 
somewhat unsettled by the recent network maneuvers. . . . 
sponsor's Spot Radio section tells how these shifts will affect 
advertiser's fall plans. 

Comprehensive in scope, the section covers developments 
in a wide variety of subjects allied with spot radio. Top spot 
ad agencies are given; singing commercials; transit radio; 
storecasting; transcriptions; music libraries; regional net- 
works; and minority audiences. 

Every trend which sponsor's industry-wide survey has 
been able to spot is outlined for fall planning use. One extra 
"bonus" is a group of tips on how to buy spot radio effec- 
tively. 

To get an idea of the thoroughness with which spot radio 
is covered, look over index at right. It will serve to select 
needed topics for immediate use. 



Spot radio busies <,<> 

Spot radio scope <><. 

Business outlook «7 

Time rales <;» 

Availabilities 70 

Spot sponsors 70 
Agencies placing most spot 72 

Spot programs 72 

Program improvements 80 

Tips on iimebuying 00 

Singing eommereials ft.» 

Transeriptions Kit 

Network eo-op sbow s 02 

Library serviees 93 

FM ».» 

Transit Itadio 96 

Storecasting 100 

Foreign-language market 102 

Regional nets 101 



16 JULY 1951 



65 




111! II 



> 



jt 




i «i 



« < 




\ 



/ 







'BOLD VENTURE," ZIV E.T. SERIES STARRING BOGARTS, IS HIT. BUT NEW SHOWS ARE FEW IN ERA OF TV UNCERTAINTIES 



Spot radio basics 

Q. What precisely is spot radio? 

A. According to a working definition 
offered to sponsor by N. C. (Duke) 
Rorabaugh, compiler of the Rorabaugh 
Reports, "Spot radio is the use of ra- 
dio by national or regional advertis- 
ers in two or more markets not in- 
volving the line facilities of one of 
the four major networks." 

Fssentialh . il is ;i form ol radio ad- 
vertising involving the purchase of ei- 
ther announcements, or station breaks, 
in programs, on a local market-by- 
market, station-by-station basis. 



Q. What advantages does spot ra- 
dio have for an advertiser this fall? 

A. Tins fall, or any other time of year, 
spot radio's greatest advantage is its 
flexibility. In the words of Mary Mc- 
Kenna, media director anrl timebuyer 
at Benton & Bowles, New York, who 
handles Best Foods' broadcast adver- 
tising for Hellmann's Mayonnaise and 
Nucoa Margarine: "1 love spot radio 
because its pinpoint coverage is ver- 
satile enough to fit the sponsor's com- 
plex marketing pattern." 



Q. What are the particular virtues 
of spot radio announcements and 
chain breaks? 

A. A SPONSOR survey of advertisers, 
agencj account executives, and time- 
buyers discloses that the majority fa- 



vored these brief commercial messages 
because of their versatility and low 
cost. Here are their benefits as sum- 
marized succinctly by Robert Brenner. 
radio/TV director of Lewin. Williams 
& Saylor, Inc., New York: 

1. Spot radio announcements allow 
an advertiser to move in and out of 
schedules. Perhaps, shall we say, put 
the pressure on one market and re- 
move it from another. 

2. You are able to buy a "ready 
made" audience. An announcement 
placed next to a top-rated program 
naturally will catch the best possible 
audience. 

3. An advertiser can take advantage 
of unusual market opportunities, re- 
sulting from local developments or sea- 
sonal conditions. He can be on the 
air in less than 24 hours and cancel in 
two weeks. 

4. The buying of announcements 
offers the advertiser maximum adver- 
tising mentions at lowest cost. 



Q. What are the particular virtues 
of buying spot programs? 

A. Brenner also listed these benefits 
for SPONSOR: 

1. Radio listening in most cases be- 
comes a fixed habit. Therefore, a good 
program can become a part of the 
daily routine, and assures the adver- 
tiser continuous listening. 

2. Having selected the right time 
for a program, the sponsor secures a 
franchise on this time. 

3. When a sponsor has a program. 



he can use the talent to help push the 
product with local distributors and re- 
tailers. 

4. An advertiser can combine both 
a selling and institutional job by spon- 
soring a program. In addition, you 
are able to get across your full selling 
message. 



Spot radio scope 



Q. What potential audience can 
a national spot advertiser reach 
this fall? 

A. If an advertiser were to stage a 
mass spot campaign, he could reach, 
potentially, 96% of the United States. 
There will be a total of 71.900,000 ra- 
dio sets in homes this fall, not to for- 
get the 19.100.000 in automobiles (an 
increasingly important factor in all ra- 
dio advertising) and 5.000.000 in pub- 
lic places. 



Q. What number of radio-only 
homes can a sponsor reach? 

A. According to an NBC estimate, ra- 
dio-only homes will number six out of 
every 10 in the United States. They 
break down this way: three of them 
are inside TV areas and three of them 
are outside TV areas. In round fig- 
ures, the radio-only homes number 
27,900.000— including 63% of the 
population. To this, of course, must 
be added the residual radio listening 



66 



SPONSOR 




SPOT RADIO CLINICS HELP REPS, SPONSORS UNDERSTAND ONE ANOTHER. LEFT, DOUGLAS BALLIN, WHITEHALL, GEORGE CASTLE- 
MAN, FORMERLY BO.&P. NOW CBS, ARE HONOR GUESTS. RIGHT, LEONARD COLSON, MENNEN; H. M. SCHACHTE, BORDEN; REPS 



that occurs within TV homes, which 
is greater than you might think. 

In fact, according to a recent study 
by A. C. Nielsen Company, radio lis- 
tening before noontime is even greater 
in video homes than it is in radio-only 
homes. Between 9:00 and 10:00 a.m.. 
the report shows, radio-only homes 
have an average of 17.9 per minutes 
of listening. In video homes during the 
same hour, average radio listening is 
22.0 minutes. Between 10:00 and 
11:00 a.m., the figure is 18.6 in radio 
homes, as compared with 28.0 minutes 
in TV homes. Between 11:00 a.m. and 
noon, the radio-only figure is 20.1 as 
against 28.3 minutes in TV homes. 



Q. How will spot radio circulation 
this fall stack up against other 
media? 

A. Very well indeed. Radio will still 
give you the biggest circulation. As 
already pointed out. total radio circu- 
lation is 42,900,000, reaching 967c of 
the United States, and radio-only cir- 
culation is 27,900,000. reaching 63 ( ! 
of the U. S. Now compare these with 
TV, with an estimated circulation of 
13,500,000 this October, reaching 33' , 
of the U. S.; Saturday Evening Post, 
circulation 4,036.246. reaching 9' < : 
Life, circulation 5,351.630, reaching 
12%; This Week, circulation 10,006,- 
564. reaching 22%. 



Q. How do radio outlets stack up 
against TV outlets numerically? 



A. Radio broadcasting outlets still 
dwarf TV by a vast measure. Most re- 
cent figures show there were 2,173 
AM radio stations in the United States 
in 1950 — 75 more than the 2,098 in 
1949. The FCC has frozen the num- 
ber of TV stations at 107 and the 
freeze may continue for a year or 
more (see freeze discussion, page 142). 

Spot radio business 
outlook 



Q. How is spot radio buying shap- 
ing up for this fall? 



A. Over-all, \ ou can expect spot busi- 
ness to be heavy, with stations in non- 
TV areas reaping boom sales, and 
those in TV areas either holding their 
own nicely, or showing a moderate in- 
crease over last fall's trade. Stations 
showing the least increase in sales will 
be those in the highly competitive, 
huge TV metropolitan markets, like 
New York City. Chicago, and Los An- 
geles. 

The upsurge of spot radio buying is 
following a continuous pattern. Spot 
broke all records in 1950 with an all- 
time high of $121,000,000 in total bill- 
ings—nearly $12,000,000 more than 



Industries which spend the most In spot radio 
820.000.000 SI 1.500.000 88.000.000 



Foods 



87,000.000 

Gasoline 



84.000.000 



Tobacco 



Drugs 



Soaps 



80.000.000 

Beer 



$3,500,000 

Clothing 

Cand y & Soft Drinks 

Jewelry 

Radio & TV Sets 



Automotive 



85.000.000 

Toiletries 

Household Equipment 



83.000.000 

Insurance & Banks 

Agricultural 

Products 



Source: SPONSOR estimate for 1950 



16 JULY 1951 



67 



spot sales in 1949. In 1951. accord- 
ing to estimates of station representa- 
tives, all signs point to an even bigger 
gross of about $132,000,000. 



Q. Why are more sponsors buying 
into spot this fall? 

A. Primarily, it's because many na- 
tional sponsors are decreasing their 
network radio efforts to advertise in 
TV. But, since TV only covers 60' < 
of the population in 63 markets, ad- 
vertisers are buying into spot radio to 
reach the non-TV markets. There are 
other good reasons, too. One is point- 
ed out bv Joseph Weed, president of 
Weed & Company, station representa- 
tives. "Our business in spot radio is 
now up 11',."' he told sponsor. 
"Why? Because there's currently more 
consumer money in circulation, and 
advertisers are going all out to get it. 

Another factor to consider is that in 
one TV-station cities, like Pittsburgh. 
Richmond and Buffalo, where the 
prime TV time is sold out. both new 
and habitual broadcast advertisers are 
diverting money instead into spot ra- 
dio — in some cases to keep up with 
competitors who are on TV. A final 
reason is that the broadcasters them- 
selves are expending full efforts to pro- 
mote spot radio to the hilt: exactly 
how is answered in the question below. 



Q. What efforts are broadcasters 
making to attract advertisers to 
spot radio? 

A. The numerous inducements broad- 
casters are offering to advertisers seek- 
ing spot radio are too man) to be com- 
pletelv covered here. There's no doubt, 
though, that sponsors will benefit from 
these "lures." The palm) days when 
broadcasters could sit back on their 
watts and wait for customers to crowd 
in are over. Sponsors will gain from 
the increased promotional efforts, the 
heightened use of imagination in pro- 
graming as broadcasters wake from 
their letharg) to battle the inroads of 
l\. 

lien- are jus! a lew typical promo- 
tional efforts that broadcasters are em- 
ploying to draw sponsors into spot ra- 
dio this fall: 

1. WGAR, Cleveland, ha- just re- 
leased an attractive booklet, entitled 
"Radio Rides the Streets and High- 
ways." To -how sponsors one of the 
bonuses radio offers, the stud\ reveals 
the findings of a survej of 0.378 auto- 



mobile operators in 64 locations. Sur- 
vev showed that 81 out of every 100 
autos in Cuyahoga County ( the home 
county I contain a radio; people with 
car radios keep their sets turned on 
74% of the time they are driving. 

2. WCAU, Philadelphia, has begun 
a concentrated program to house-build 
local programs for specific classes of 
clients. Joseph T. Connolly, vice pres- 
ident, says it "represents the opening 
gun in a drive to sell radio next fall 
as it never has been sold in Philadel- 
phia." An example of this new con- 
cept is WCALPs 15-minute She's En- 
gaged, in which a staffer selects new- 
ly engaged young women from the so- 
ciety columns of Philadelphia's news- 
papers, tape records interviews in a 
humorous or romantic vein. The pro- 
gram, naturally, would be tailored for 
food or household appliance firms. 

3. Jo show that spot radio is still 
doing a potent job in a TV market. 
WBT. Charlotte, has put out an effec- 
tive pamphlet that begins: "YES. tele- 
vision is growing sensational)' in the 
Carolinas — with sets quintupled in the 
last 12 months. BUT WBT is growing, 
too. Take Sunday night for instance. 
In the eight half-hour periods between 
6:00 and 10:00 p.m.. WBT ratings are 
up six, even in one. slightly down in 
one. Where is the TV audience com- 
ing from? This chart shows it comes 
from competitive stations and from 
new listener-viewers. . . ." 



Spot radio time rates 



Q. What's the outlook in spot ra- 
dio rates this fall? 

A. Generally, you can expect rates in 
several non-TV areas to be up this 
September, while those in TV areas 
will hold to the status quo. A straw 
in the wind came recently from S. A. 
Cisler. of WKYW. Louisville. Ky.. sec- 
retary of the Association of Indepen- 
dent Metropolitan Stations. At a June 
meeting in which about 20 station op- 
erators participated, he said, "more 
than 55', of the station membership 
present indicated their local rates were 
to be increased this fall, or had al- 
ready been boosted." 

Cisler went on to report: "A number 
of independents were shifting to the 
single rate card polic) for both nation- 
al and local accounts, and some were 
announcing a single rate for all 
hour-. 



Q. Are under-the-counter rate-re- 
ducing deals on the station level 
still continuing this fall? 

A. \ es. but a concerted drive is being 
made to stamp out this bargain-base- 
ment type of selling. A dozen station 
representatives polled by sponsor 
agreed, ruefully and quite unofficiallv. 
that well over 40 r < of the radio sta- 
tions in the United States indulged in 
covert deals. A major reason for this 
secret thimble-rigging of rates is the 
keen competition among the stations 
for immediate cash business. Accord- 
ing to the FCC. there were 2,098 AM 
radio stations in the United States 
which in 1949 grossed $307,000,000. 
In 19.50. thanks largely to booming 
national spot, business zoomed to a 
gross $338,000,000. but it had to be di- 
\ ided among the nations increasing 
number of AM stations, grown from 
2.098 to 2,173. To take one example 
offered bv W ells Barnett. sales develop- 
ment manager for John Blair & Corn- 
pan) : "Peoria, before the war, had one 
radio station. After the war, it had 
six counting Pekin. Naturally, all five 
are continuing to compete sharply for 
business." 



Q. Who is trying to eliminate 
these station rate deals, and why? 

A. Most state and regional broadcast- 
er associations and the reps are urging 
stations to stick to rate card rates. 
Perhaps the most unified effort is be- 
ing made by the recently formed Affil- 
iates Committee, headed by the highly 
respected industry leader. Paul W. 
I Fritz 'I Morenc) . general manager of 
\\ TIC, Hartford. Conn. In their letter 
to network affiliates last April, the 
Committee urged station operators to 
"have no hesitancy whatsoever in in- 
creasing rates." Also implicit in the 
letter was the between-the-lines mes- 
sage: Stop slashing national spot ra- 
dio rates. 

The reasoning of the stations is 
clear. The\ believe radio rates are al- 
read\ below their true value. 



Q. How do sponsors feel about the 
unstable spot rate situation? 

A. A few of them, thinking in terms 
of the recent network radio rate slash. 
would like spot radio to follow suit. 
Marschalk & Pratt, agency for Esso, 
is reported to be canvassing stations 
about the possibility of reducing rates. 



68 



SPONSOR 





That's the direction 
of WMAQ program ratings* 



More and more listeners in the prospering Middle West are 
joining the big WMAQ family all the time. 

For instance, in spite of a slight seasonal decline in al 
Chicago area listening during the first four months of 1951: 



53 
66 



0/ of rated WMAQ quarter-hours showed 



increased ratings. 

0/ of rated WMAQ quarter-hours either 
increased or remained constant. 



Contact WMAQ, Merchandise Mart, Chicago, or your near- 
est NBC Spot Sales office NOW for assistance in placing 
your sales messages before this ever-growing audience. 



* Pulse of Chicago 




16 JULY 1951 



69 



Dudlev Leblanc, the Hadacol tycoon 
i currently off radio temporarily while 
he gains breath), is notorious for un- 
der-the-counter deals. 

The great majority of ad agencies 
and advertisers, though, would like to 
see under-the-counter deals ended and 
station rates stabilized at a reasonable 
level. Those surveyed by sponsor 
agreed they would not like to see the 
medium degenerate into a cloak-and- 
suit business. If rates were to become 
too cheap, they feel, the medium itself 
would become suspect. (See statement 



by Jeff Wade in Mr. Sponsor Asks, 
page 176.) 



Spot radio availabilities 



Q. How easy or difficult will it be 
to find spot radio availabilities this 
fall? 

A. Generally, sponsors will be able to 
find spot availabilities easily in TV 
areas; not so easily in non-TV areas. 
By and large, you'll find the greatest 



LISTENERS KNOW 



THEY May Be Missing Something 

if They Don't Stay Tuned to This 

On-its-toes Newspaper Station 



WE KNOW 



YOU May Be Missing Something 
if You Don't Investigate 




INTERESTING AVAILABILITIES NOW! 

Because We Are NOW— and Recently!— Full Time 

PHONE US ABOUT AVAILABILITIES 

Phone Joseph Hershcy McCillvra, Inc., Our National Rep. 

1440 on the dial • 1,000 watts daytime • 500 watts night 



rush will be for the prime "family lis- 
tening" periods — 7:00 to 9:00 a.m. 
breakfast time; 12:00 noon to 1:00 
p.m. lunch time; 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. 
supper time. In TV areas, daytime 
slots will be most sought after, rather 
than evening periods, when radio will 
be competing against the video audi- 
ence. 

Most ad agencies, now mapping 
their fall spot radio campaigns, are 
already contending with the rush for 
daytime spot radio availabilities. Typ- 
ical was the comment sponsor received 
from Paul Gumbinner, timebuyer at 
the Gumbinner Agency for Chap Stick 
and Chap-ans, which buys fall spot ra- 
dio over some 35 stations. "Business 
is so good at most of the top radio sta- 
tions," he says, "that one of my big- 
gest problems is getting availabilities. 
That's why I'm mapping out our au- 
tumn campaign well in advance this 
summer. A good station like WFAA, 
Dallas, is usually sold out, and it's only 
as a special favor that they wangle an 
opening for me." 

Q. What factors are making it 
easier for a national spot adver- 
tiser to buy availabilities this fall? 

A. Two key trends are opening up the 
number of availabilities a national ad- 
vertiser can acquire. First, the net- 
works are releasing so-called "fringe 
time" to their affiliates which, in some 
cases, is excellent. The stations are 
selling this additional time to national 
and local spot buyers. The reason the 
nets are releasing this sustainer time 
is, of course, to cut costs. Stations are 
pressing to get such time because they 
can sell it on their own. 



Sponsor usage of spot 



Q. What product categories will 
be most active in spot this fall? 

A. Soaps, foods, and drugs will be 
heaviest ; but station representatives 
report that brewers of beer will make 
their strongest national spot efforts in 
years. In the soap category, some sta- 
tions are worried about P & G's re- 



IS YOUR SLIP 
SHOWING? 

see page 188 



70 



SPONSOR 




Big double outdoor advertising sign on one of Knoxville's 
most heavily traveled streets — another unique promotion 
aid** used by WNOX to sell itself, its programs and its 
advertisers. 

AND LISTENERS IN THE VAST WNOXVILLE MARKET ARE 
DOING JUST THIS— ENJOYING THEMSELVES MORE THAN 
EVER BY LISTENING MORE THAN EVER TO THIS GREAT 
SCRIPPS-HOWARD RADIO STATION. 



U/NOX IS A BETTER BUY TODAY THAN EVER 
AND IS QETTINQ BETTER ALL THE TIME WITH 




• 
• 

* 
* 
• 



MORE LISTENERS THAN EVER— 

(Knoxville Sets-in-use at all-time high — no television competition ) 

BETTER SERVICE AND PROGRAMS THAN EVER— 

(More for your money in every way) 

HIGHER HOOPERS THAN EVER— 

(Among the highest in the country) 

BIGGER MARKET THAN EVER— 

(WNOXVILLE area is booming) 

MORE ADVERTISERS THAN EVER— 

(With many waiting for vacancies) 



SCRIPPS-HOWARD RADIO, INC. 



Representatives: THE BRANHAM COMPANY 



CBS -10,000 WATTS -990KC- KNOXVILLE, TENN 



Others are movie trailers in all leading theaters, many outdoor adver- 
tising signs strategically located, bus cards on both sides of busses, taxicab 
cards, window displays on busiest street in town, big posters on express 
company trucks, letters to dealers, a monthly mailing piece to hundreds of 
grocers and druggists, courtesy announcements plugging programs, and 
anything else it takes to sell — to get listeners — and keep them. 



It's an 

indisputable fact — 

KLIX 

isKLICKIN 

in Idaho 's Fabulous 
Agriculture Empire 

MAGIC VALLEY 



1 
1 



Farm Market 
st - Idaho 



in 



Farm Market 
*** /// the Inter- 
mountain J Test 



56 



Farm Market 
*" /'// the Nation 



KLIX 



is KLICKIN 

and George HoIIingbery 
can 'prove it! 

1000 watts 
on 1310 
Twin Falls, 
Idaho 

A merican Broadi asting Company 

Rocky Mountain 
Broadcasting System 

Frank C. Mclntyre 
V. P. &? Gen. Mgr. 



cent cancellations of spring spot drives 
for Spic & Span and Tide, and easing 
up of those for Joy, Lilt. Drene, and 
other P & G products. P & G spokes- 
men, though, report the curtailment 
was merely timed to end with the P & 
G fiscal year on 30 June. Colgate, 
Palmolive, Peet has also curtailed its 
spot scheduling recently; and some 
representatives believe it is in the proc- 
ess of withdrawing its announcements 
from TV areas and concentrating them 
in non-TV areas. In the food category, 
frozen foods and breakfast cereals will 
get a heavy play this fall; and in the 
drug group, deodorants and cosmetics 
will be pushed. Wildroot is returning 
heavily to spot ; so is Bromo Seltzer. 

Patent drugs, like Lydia E. Pink- 
ham's vegetable compound and Mus- 
terole and Pertussin, will be promoted 
hard on spot radio, but largely in the 
Southern markets. The anti-histamines, 
trying to regain waning public curi- 
osity in their cold cures, will probably 
step up their national spot coverage. 

The hard goods spot picture is un- 
certain, dependent on surpluses piled 
up in retail outlets on the one hand 
( like TV sets ) , and wartime shortages 
of vital metal parts on the other hand 
(like electrical appliances). By and 
large, you can expect automobiles, like 
Dodge, Austin, and Kaiser-Frazer. to 
be advertised on a regional or local 
spot sales basis; razor blades, like Gil- 
lette and Silver Star, to be pushed on a 
mass national basis; and agricultural 
goods to be promoted on a particular 
locale basis, near points of distribu- 
tion. 

Miscellaneous products, like shoes, 
airlines, and telephone service, will in- 
crease their usage of spot radio a great 
deal. The same applies to book pub- 
lishers, movies and magazines, who 
will make extra-strong efforts to lure 
the public away from their video sets. 
Institutions, on the order of the Flor- 
ida Citrus Commission and the Bitu- 
minous Coal Institute, will stand pat 
with their present spot radio efforts. 
However, large corporations who have 
not been in spot radio before, will 
probably enter the field (using insti- 
tutional advertising I . In an attempt 
to reach the No. 1 sales throne, aggres- 
sive cigarette companies, like P. Loril- 
lard and Philip Morris, will undoubt- 
edl) step up their spot radio coverage. 



Q. Who are among the top users 
of spot radio? 



A. For a dollars-and-cents breakdown 
of spot radio revenue by product 
groups, see chart (page 67 I . Accord- 
ing to a SPONSOR survey of station rep- 
resentatives, these will be among the 
top 20 buyers of spot radio this Fall 
I not in rank order I : P. & G; Lever; 
Peter Paul Candy; Brock Candy Com- 
pany; Coca-Cola: Continental Oil 
Company; Best Foods; Esso; General 
Foods; Philip Morris: Borden; Atlan- 
tic Gas & Oil; Robert Hall: d-Con; 
Wildroot. 



Agencies using .spot 
radio most 



Q. Which advertising agencies 
place most national spot advertis- 
ing? 

A. According to N. C. Rorabaugh. 
the following are included among the 
top 15 spot placing agencies (not in 
order of ranking) : BBDO; Young & 
Rubicam: Ruthrauff & Ryan; Biow; 
N. W. Ayer & Son; Benton & Bowles; 
Ted Bates; William Esty: William 
Weintraub; J. Walter Thompson; 
Dancer-Fitzgerald & Sample. 



Spot radio programs 



Q. What are the main trends this 
fall in local-level programing? 

A. Over-all, you can expect news and 
disk jockey programs to be the most 
sought-after bidders for the public ear. 
An increased interest has been shown, 
too, in religious shows, participation 



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OLD ESTABLISHED 



ESTABLISHED 1930 



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ABC STATION 



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A MARSHALL FIELD STATION 
REPRESENTED 
NATIONALLY BY 
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16 JULY 1951 



73 



Ever hear about the little 
that went to Fort Wayne 
(with $750,000 in it)? 



WOWO's real-life, "sell-out" 
drama with a happy 
ending and a fiM33t 
for everybody 



What happened in Fort Wayne might 
just as easily have happened in Houston 
or in Sacramento or in Richmond, Va. 
Point is: it happened. Seems WO WO in 
Fort Wayne arranged a modest little 
marriage between the Gladieux Heating 
Company and THESAURUS' Music by 
Roth show. 

Just one-quarter hour at one o'clock 
every Sunday — hut with enough people 
in 49 counties listening for the show 
to boost Gladieux' business 600%, to 
sell $750,000 worth of oil burners in one 
year ... to set up such a clamor for 
heaters that shortages began to de- 
velop, orders had to be back-ordered, 
the heating company had to sign off, 
catch its breath, and embark on a re- 
luctant separation from the Roth Show. 

What about this Allen Roth, pied 
piper who piped in too many customers 
too quick, and led Station WOWO and 
its sponsors into this unusual "sell- 
out'" predicament? 



Music by ROTH" 




pied piper of 

Fort Wayne and 

points E, 5, N and W 



Koth is the man 
with the bow lie 
v\ ho conducts on 
llielamous Milton 
Berle program. 
familiar to millions. One of radio's 
most versatile wizards, he whirls you 
ihrough his musical "style show," out- 




specializing the specialists in any 
musical mood you could mention. All 
this with a hypnotic quality which 
seems to surround a sales message with 
urge and compulsion. 

After Roth delivered his friendly 
knockout to Sponsor Gladieux, WOWO 
unwrapped this dynamite property on 
the desk of Fort Wayne's toughest 
prospect. \\ illi a hard-hitting, fact- 
filled brochure to show, with a snappy, 
smooth audition disc to play, WOWO 
made an immediate re-sale. Soon, re- 
quests for the new sponsor's leaflet were 
(lowing in from 49 counties at a rale 
regarded by station and sponsor as 
"bordering on the phenomenal." So 
WOWO's little drama had a happy 




Every Gladieux heater dealer within 75 miles of 
Fort Wayne felt the sales impact of "M'.'sic by 
Roth." Theme: "You're paying for an oil burner 
NOW — why not have one installed!" 



ending, after all. And Roth's new spon- 
sor won't be sold into shortages. This 
time, it's a bank. 

romps all over the clock 
in Fort Wayne 

"Music by Roth" is just one THESAURUS 
show earning talent fees and time 
charges for WOWO. Recentlv released 
"Hour of Charm" and "Wayne King 
Serenade" are two others. Altogether, 
nineteen THESAURUS shows are run- 
ning in Fort Wayne every week; most 
of them stand right around the top in 
audience surveys . . . three with more 
listeners than any other show running 
at the same time. 

/mHQ31 for everybody 

Since Fort \\ ayne is about as close to 
typical as any community ever is, this 
THESA1 HI S success story calls for a 
closer look by stations, agencies and 
sponsors in other areas. Some of the 
things selling-minded people every- 
where like about THESAURUS: 

for station 

Station can pa) the whole cost of 
THESA1 HI S with the first 2 or 3 sales— 
have a talent-packed reservoir all ready 
and waiting as new sales opportunities 



come up. Every possible production 
aid to give local radio professional pace 
and polish . . . voice, music and sound 
effects to short-cut production expense. 

for agency 

Agency can easily and effectively launch 
clients on radio with THESAURUS' 
keen, hard-hitting presentation mate- 
rial. THESAURUS offers the agency 
established big-name shows . . . with a 
talent-plus-economy story no other serv- 
ice can match. 

for sponsor 

Sponsor can choose the exact THE- 
SAURUS show to fit his audience, audi- 
tion it, check its results in other markets. 
Sponsor with a small budget can buy 
"big time" talent. He can take to the 
air at unbelievably low cost and get 
proved performance. 

* * * 

Complete audience-building promotion 
kits packed with material to merchan- 
dise THESAURUS shows locally: biogra- 
phies, announcement and feature press 
releases, photos, photo and ad mats, 
exploitation campaigns. 

Your THESAURUS shows get the 
nation's hits before they're hits — 52 or 
more selections every month — provid- 
ing new tunes well ahead of their 



popularity peak. Basic library of over 
5,000 selections with weekly continuity 
for 28 program series — 55 individual 
shows. Recorded tie-ins, cross-plugs, pre- 
broadcast announcements, mood music, 
vocal cues, voice tracks, sound effects, 
time and weather jingles, commercial 
jingles, special Holiday Shows, etc. 

talent-roster grows! 

New big-name shows are piling into the 
big economy package all the time ! 
Spitalny's famous "Hour of Charm," 
"The Wayne King Serenade ," "Sons of the 
Pioneers" and "Hank Snow and His Rainbow 
Ranch Boys" are four recent newcomers 
to the THESAURUS family— all with 
ready-made audiences in the millions. 

"The 
WAYNE KING 
Serenade" 

whose famous, 
honey-toned tem- 
j po has become a 
familiar and beloved nation-wide insti- 
tution. One of the most amazing 
examples of continuous audience pop- 
ularity and commercial success in the 
history of radio. 



PHIL 

SPITALNY'S 

"Hour of Charm" 

has won one of 

r\ in erica's most 
v-""^* ^W faithful ami devoted 

followings — built 
during a continuous decade of coast- 
to-coast sponsorship by one of the 
great U. S. brand names. A powerful 




sell 



ing i 



nil 



uence on 



"Mr 



Lmenca 




"Swing and Sway -^ 

with SAMMY KAYE" -jf 



"FRAN WARREN SINGS 



Among the many other 
THESAURUS shows: 

SONS OF THE PIONEERS 

THE SINGING AMERICANS (Dr. Frank Block's Male Chorus) 

CLAUDE THORNHILL AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

LAWRENCE DUCHOW AND HIS RED RAVEN ORCHESTRA 

VINCENT LOPEZ AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

CHURCH IN THE WILDWOOD 

HERE'S JUNE CHRISTY with the Johnny Guarnieri Quintet 

RAY McKINLEY AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

OLD NEW ORLEANS (Jimmy Lytell ond the "Delta Eight") 

NORMAN CLOUTIER AND HIS MEMORABLE MUSIC 

A FESTIVAL OF WALTZES 

MUSIC HALL VARIETIES 

SLIM BRYANT AND HIS WILDCATS 

I HEAR THE SOUTHLAND SINGING (Golden Gate Quartet) 

DOWN HARMONY LANE 

RIDIN' THE RANGE 

ORGANAIRES 

LISTEN TO LEIBERT 

MUSIC IN MARCH TIME 

Send for THESAURUS' comprehensive 
brochure today! 



E TEX BENEKE SHOW" 




ARTHUR FIEDLER conducts 
"Concert Hall of the Air" 



EDDIE FISHER, 
now featured on "Music by Roth" 




"HANK SNOW and His 
Rainbow Ranch Boys" 



JOHNNY DESMOND on 
"The Music of Manhattan" 



recorded 
gram 

services 



pro; 



RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 

RCA VICTOR DIVISION 

630 Fifth Avenue, New York 20. V.y. 

Chicago Hollywood Atlanta Dallas 



programs, homemaker programs, and 
musical programs slanted for bilingual 
markets. Reason for the popularity of 
these programs, is that they give na- 
tional advertisers intimate contact with 
the special tastes of local audiences. 

In TV areas, sponsors are buying 
into daytime programs and specialized 
shows such as sports, foreign language 
and marginal time. Many stations are 
running 20 hours around the clock, in 
order to increase prime after-midnight 
time. One example is WOV, New 
York, which has a brewery sponsor ad- 
vertising at 3 a.m. at regular rates. A 



Pulse survey for WNEW projected to 
3.492,000 radio homes in 12 counties 
of metropolitan New York-New Jersey 
found 38.4% of the homes tuned to 
radio between midnight and 6:00 a.m. 
A more detailed breakdown of spot 
radio program trends is found in an- 
swers to questions below, based on a 
national AM station survey conducted 
by SPONSOR. 



Q. What's the outlook in news 
programs? 

A. The boom in news programing 



WHHM 



MEMPHIS 



"independent—but not alooP 



is 



happy to announce 
the reappointment of 

FORJOE & COMPANY 

as exclusive 

national representatives 

effective 

July 16, 1951 



L 



since the Korean war broke continues 
unabated. Even following in the wake 
of the Korean fighting, advertisers are 
banking on the fact that audiences will 
still be interested in the post-war mop- 
up and a jittery Asia and Europe. 

A typical response from sponsor's 
survey came from William J. Adams, 
program director of WHEC. Roches- 
ter: "In increases or decreases, spot 
news seems to be the program that 
pulls the greatest audience, as well as 
the one to which sponsors remain loy- 
al." 

From Vern Lindblade, commercial 
manager of KFVD. Los Angeles: "We 
have noticed no substantial increases 
or decreases in any particular type 
program, with the exception of a great- 
er news popularity (by our audiences I 
since the Korean war. . . ." 

And from Joyce M. Chapman, ad- 
vertising and publicity director for 
WJBK, Detroit, 24-hour station which 
presents news every hour-on-the-hour 
in co-operation with the Detroit Times: 
"The audience for news broadcasts has 
been steadily increasing over the 
months. Nighttime Hooper ratings 
are greater than ever before." 

Q. What's the outlook in disk 
jockey programs? 

A. Disk jockey shows are running 
neck-and-neck with news in increased 
public and sponsor popularity. Here 
are typical replies from sponsor's sur- 
vey, explaining this trend toward the 
heavy usage of platter-spinners: 

Bill Roche, promotion director for 
WFBR. Baltimore, says: "I believe 
there has been a definite trend at 
WFBR toward more disk jockey pro- 
grams. This has also been advised by 
our national rep. The reason for this 
is to build inexpensive participating 
announcement shows that will have at- 
tractive ratings. It is the opinion of 
some people that this is the only reply 
to TV competition." 

Morton S. Cohn. program director. 
WCHS, Charleston, W. Va., reports: 
"According to the latest Hooper sur- 
vey, which was conducted in Charles- 
ton from November. 1950. through 
March. 1951, the disk jockey programs 
seem to be doing best." 

Claire Himmel, research director of 
WNEW, New York, whose Art Ford 
Milkman's Matinee totals up a week- 
ly audience of 1.025.000: "Our latest 
survev proves conclusively that the 
post-midnight audience is not limited 
to night-owls and such late-night work- 



76 



SPONSOR 



WCBS ANNOUNCES 



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ALL STATION-BREAK 
ADVERTISING! 






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WCBS has always been the best station-break buy in New York. Now 

it's better than ever. Now WCBS offers advertisers a new plan. Now you can 

have your commercials delivered by your choice of WCBS local stars: 

Margaret Arlen, Jack Sterling, Phil Cook, Bill Leonard, Tommy Riggs 

and Betty Lou, John Reed King, or Harry Marble. 

Their familiar voices— heard at unexpected times— mean extra attention 

to your recorded announcements. And extra sales. 

Their entree into New York homes is your entree . . . their success can 
be your success. For complete information about star-studded 
station breaks custom-cut to your product, just get in touch with . . . 1A#£RC 

New York's #1 Station • Columbia Owned • Represented by Radio Sales 



SELL! 

. . . over Western North 

Carolina's Most Powerful 

Radio Combination: 



AM 




ASHEVILLE, N. C. 

The sure way, the economical way, 
the effective way, to reach this big. 
wealthy market. AM and FM! 



WLOS Promotion: 

NEWSPAPER Space 
Strategic BILLBOARDS 
WINDOW DISPLAYS 
DIRECT MAIL 

WLOS Personalities: 

UNCLE BING— Hillbilly 

DR. BOP— Western North 
Carolina's Only Colored 
Disc Jockey 

FRED BROWN— Sports 

SUNNY DAYE— Women's 
Shows 

WLOS POWER: 

5,000 Watts Day— 1,000 Watts 
Night— 1380 kc 

9200 Watts 104.3 mc 
Asheville's Only FM Station 

Proved results for local advertisers 
and for the great names among 
American products. Let us give 
you detailed lads! 

Ask The 

O. L. TAYLOR COMPANY 

Chicago 



New York 
I n\ Vngeles 



Dallas 
San Francisco 



or Call or Write 

WLOS, WLOS-FM 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 

Affiliated with 
The American Broadcasting Company 



ers as taxi drivers and short-order 
cooks. A lot of people are returning 
home late from such ordinary activi- 
ties as visiting or attending the thea- 
tre, ball games, club meetings — all of 
which make for a very substantial 
amount of disk jockey radio listening 
after midnight, both while driving 
home and at-home before retiring." 



Q. What's the outlook in women's 
home economic programs? 

A. Most stations report that an in- 
creasing number of sponsors are buy- 
ing into these daytime chit-chat shows 
for the hausfrau. Their reasoning runs 
this way : "TV women's programs have 
the admittedly potent virtue of being 
able to display products visually. But 
the housewife, busy housecleaning. 
would rather have her domestic ad- 
vice offered in easy, aural doses." 

One woman's program director who 
gets a big hearing on both AM and 
TV is Fay Stewart. Her woman's pro- 
gram has been aired daily for seven 
years on KSFO, San Francisco; now 
she's also heard five times weekly on 
KP1X Kitchen, on KPIX-TV, San 
Francisco. WFBR. Maryland, reports 
strong sponsor interest for this fall in 
Shoppin Fun, It's Fun to Cook, and 
Every Woman's Hour; as does KFVD, 
Los Angeles, in its Shopping Hilites. 



Q. What's the outlook in House- 
wives' Protective League pro- 
grams? 

A. Sponsor participation in HPL's 
programs — Sunrise Salute, Starlight 
Salute and the afternoon Housewives' 
Protective League show — is shaping up 
strong in most of its 10 markets. Ed 
Wood, General manager for the HPL 
programs at CBS Radio Sales, told 
sponsor: "Our business this fall looks 
as though it'll be ahead of last year's 
— even in TV areas, like Washington, 
I). C. and Hollywood. In some TV 
markets, though, it may be down some- 
what. All in all. business will be very 
good. Why? Because HPL programs, 
with their boards of housewife testers, 
have proved over the last 16 years that 
they can sell merchandise." 

Q. What's the outlook in religious 
programs? 

A. Extremely promising. A concise 
summary of the trend is wrapped up 
in the report made to SPONSOR by John 
Cleghorn. general manager of WHBO. 



Memphis: "You will find among a 
great many stations in the South a 
notable increase in the number of re- 
ligious programs. Most of these are 
commercial programs, bought and paid 
for by independent evangelists and 
evangelistic preachers supported by 
congregations on a regional basis." 



Q. What's the outlook in public 
service programs? 

A. Sponsors this fall can make a very 
shrewd buy in public service programs 
— they often have a strong local im- 
pact. The most profitable sponsorship 
will be on those stations which have 
used imagination in developing origi- 
nal shows, rather than depending on 
the" yat-ta-ta-ta of local speech-makers 
in an effort to fill the time slot. Here 
are just three random samples of intel- 
ligent public service programs: 

N. L. Bentson. commercial manager 
of WMIN, St. Paul, Minn., reports: 
"When the Minnesota 47th Viking Di- 
vision was called to active service, 
WMIN's special events department sent 
a unit to Camp Rucker, Ala., to 'follow 
the boys.' A WMIN staff announcer, 
producer and engineer flew to Camp 
Rucker: taped a series of one-hour 
shows, Camp Rucker Report, which 
were air expressed back to the Twin 
Cities and released on successive Sun- 
day afternoons. Listener response? 
Thousands of congratulatory letters. 
Sponsor response? One hundred spon- 
sors went begging for just a mention 
of their names on the series." 

WHO. Des Moines. Iowa, has built a 
reputation for itself as a public serv- 
ice station. Outstanding among its 
spark-plugs of local attention are its 
European Relief Project program, 
which has enlisted listeners to send 
tons of food. 54.000 parcels to needy 
Europeans; Veterans' Forum, in which 
local vets' problems are discussed and 
solved; News and Views About Relig- 



RESULTS PROVE 

500,000 

MEXICANS IN CREATER 

LOS ANGELES 

LISTEN TO 6 HOURS OF 

SPANISH 

PROGRAMMING DAILY ON 

KWKW AND KWKW-FM 

ASK FORJOE 



78 



SPONSOR 



Sherman was right! 



In describing the strategic importance of Atlanta, 

General Sherman likened the city to a point 

in the palm of his hand. Outstretched fingers 

represented vital supply routes on which depended 

the life of the Confederacy. 

"/ close my fist on Atlanta," said he, "and 

I capture the whole great Southeast." 

We relate this incident — not that we enjoy the 

recollection — but because, in effect, the 

same dramatic strategy applies for a successful 

sales attack on this region today. 

In its role as the distribution center and commercial 

capital of the Southeast, Atlanta wields a 

tremendous sales influence on the entire market. 

Concentrate major effort on Atlanta through Dixie's 

most powerful advertising media — WSB and WSB-TV- 

and make an impact that will be felt throughout 

the entire Southeastern Empire. 




wsb wsb-fv 



THE VOICE OF THE SOUTH 



ON PEACHTREE STREET 



Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and The Atlanta Constitution 
Represented by Edward Petry fcf Company, Inc. 



16 JULY 1951 



79 



ion: and Country Home, a public ser- 
vice program slanted toward farm 
women. 

Finally. WGAR. Cleveland, has de- 
veloped a neat gimmick in its Ask City 
Hall, in which special events director 
Donald C. Hyde poses questions of civ- 
ic interest to city hall officials. 



in ru 



ral 



Q. What's the outlook 
music programs? 

A. A strictly local trend was report- 
ed to sponsor by WHBQ, Memphis: 
There is a decline here in audience 



preference for the so-called hill-billy, 
folk or Western music. We have a staff 
band which at one time played hillbilly 
music almost exclusively. However, 
the boys switched to a rather sophisti- 
cated type of hillbilly tune and a good 
deal of straight dance music, border- 
ing on the Dixie Land style. We ob- 
jected to this for a time, but we are 
convinced that is what the listener 
wants." 

This tendency toward sophistication 
seems spotted only in certain areas, be- 
cause many stations elsewhere report- 
ed a continuing rnterest in genuine. 



THE 

FASTEST GROWING 

MARKET IN AMERICA IS 

BATON ROUGE 

WITH A 
257% INCREASE IN POPULATION, 1950 OVER 1940 
321 % INCREASE IN RETAIL SALES, 1949 OVER 1940 
(1949 SALES $154,000,000) 

Every survey made in the last 4 
years shows WLCS as the NO. 1 

STATION 8 A.M. to 6 P.M. 



• • • 



WLCS 



BATON ROUGE 

--ABC- 
REPRESENTED BY RAMBEAU 



blown-in-the-bottle hoosier music. Bob 
Atcher, "Top Hand of the Cowhands," 
still gets a heavy listener acceptance, 
with no modernistic folderol in music 
allowed, when his barn dance musi- 
cians play on Bob Atcher Presents on 
WLS, Chicago. And Honeyboy Hardy, 
WBOK. New Orleans, continues to fare 
well with "spirituals and sweet-talk 
music." 



Program improvements 

Q. What's being done to improve 
spot programing? 

A. Some of the most dynamic efforts 
are being made in clinics conducted 
by Associated Program Service and 
Broadcast Music. Inc. 

The BMI clinics throughout the na- 
tion have been sparked by Carl 
Harevlin. BMI president, and Glenn 
Dolberg. BMI director of station re- 
lations. I For programing tips gleaned 
from BMI's broadcaster clinics, see 
below. ) An interesting phase of 
BMIs music licensing efforts is the 
report underlining the trend toward 
music in radio. BMI handles the 
broadcast music performing rights of 
900 publishing firms with virtually 
100'f of the nation's radio/TV out- 
lets. A BMI spokesman told sponsor 
that "since we started in 1940. the use 
of our copyright music by broadcasters 
has continued to increase."' 

The APS clinics are sparked by 
Maurice I "Mitch" I Mitchell, v. p. and 
general sales manager. At a typical 
APS clinic for 50 station operators, 
for example, the suggestion was made 
that disk jockeys emphasize "mood 
block programing" rather than just 
plav favorite records. It was further 
suggested that all transcriptions be 
coded, on the basis of research done by 
Muzak: "A" for early-morning pepp> 
music: "B" for later-in-the-morning 
modefied bounce: "C" for early after- 
noon relaxation. 



Tips for s ponsors 



Q. What practical advice is avail- 
able to advertisers sponsoring spot 
programs? 

A. These tips, gleaned from BMI clin- 
ics, should be helpful: 

1. Watch out for disk jockeys who 
waste time with over-long chatter. 



SPONSOR 



PREFERRED NEGRO MARKETS PAY BIG DIVIDENDS 



Negro radio has solidly established its effectiveness to national advertisers. Any 
advertiser aware of the Negro Market potential can capture it forcefully and 
effectively by using Negro radio — the direct route to Negro sales. 

Some outstanding examples of the use of this media can be found among the 
following successes: 



A beer advertiser, fourth in sales in certain 
Negro areas, used every medium but Negro 
radio. After the advertiser decided to purchase 
this type of advertising, he jumped to second 
place in less than one year. Other beer adver- 
tisers followed suit. 

A national magazine decided that tne only 
effective medium to increase their circulation 
was the use of Negro radio. After a one week 
campaign, circulation increased by 40%. 

Two bread accounts bought Negro radio and 
increased to additional areas after sales showed 
a sharp rise. 

A cigarette advertiser had a general 15% 
increase. 

A toothpaste advertiser, after a short test, 
increased his Negro radio schedule to almost 
every Negro area. 

There are many more examples, but these 
firms are typical. Their verdict: Negro Radio 
delivers very profitable and at low cost. 



National Advertisers 
Flocking to Negro Radio 

The \alue of low-cost, high-return adver- 
tising through Negro radio can be attested 
to by such prominent national advertisers as: 
Bristol Meyers (Ipana); Colgate-Palmolive- 
Peet Company (Vel and Fab); Ebony Maga- 
zine; B. C. Remedy Company; American 
Safety Razor Company; Best Foods (Nucoa 
Margarine); General Foods (Sure-Jell); 
Griffin Shoe Polish; Falstaff Brewing Com- 
pany; Monarch Wine; Lever Bros. (Jelke 
Margarine); Champale; Welch's Wine; Sul- 
phur 8; Royal Crown Hairdressing; Murray's 
Pomade; Thorn McAn Shoe Stores; Cham- 
pagne Velvet; Gordon Baking Company; 
S S S Tonic; Hadacol. 



New Media Market 
Approach With Unique 
Programming 

The medium serving most Negroes, directly 
and specifically, is Negro radio. To use this 
medium properly, contact Preferred Negro 
Markets, Inc., covering approximately 8,000,- 
IKHI Negroes with a purchasing power of 
ovei $6,000,000,000 in 45 important areas. 

Negro programs are specifically designed 
for and directed to the entertainment prefer- 
ences of the Negro population. Programs 
featured are muscial entertainment, Negro 
guest celebrities, and Negro news and com- 
munity items. Each program acts as a public 
radio medium promoting the interest of the 
Negro in his community and is built around 
key personalities or Emcee's who over a 
period of time have established themselves 
solidly with the Negro population. These 
experienced personality salesmen enjoy the 
confidence and respect of their Negro folli V 
ing. They know how to talk the language of 
their Negro audience and put the sales mes- 
sage across with maximum impact. 




THE NEGRO MARKETS LISTED 
ON THIS MAP INCLUDE 
8,000,000 LOYAL LISTENERS 



REPRESENTED BY F0RJ0E & COMPANY 



16 JULY 1951 



81 




Mobile, Alabama 



BEAMED TO THE 




BIG AUDIENCES 
Who Are 

RADIO'S STEADY 
Year-round 
LISTENERS 

• hillbilly 

• sports 

• colored 

WKAB is the ONLY station 
in this area with a Merchan- 
dise Department to bolster 
distribution. 




Mobile, Alabama 

Representatives: 
THE FORJOE COMPANY 



2. It is unwise to buck several d.j. 
shows competing simultaneously with 
yours. 

3. Don"t neglect local names and 
events in news shows. 

4. Audience participation should 
highlight guests, not the interviewer. 

5. Never talk down to guests on au- 
dience participation shows. 

Q. What advice would help in the 
timebuying of either programs or 
announcements? 

A. A SPONSOR survey of timebuyers 
brought forth this list of cautions: 

1. Don't compare ratings without 
considering the percentage-of-error fac- 
tor. That may be the sole basis for one 
show besting another. 

2. Don't use BMB figures blindly. 
They are a valuable yardstick but must 
be applied against knowledge of the 
local scene. 

3. Don't fail to consider a station's 
standing in its own community. A rep- 
utation for integrity carries over to the 
advertised products. 

4. Don't overlook local live pro- 
grams. Frequently, they have enthusi- 
astic, sales-active followings. 

5. Don't waste talent of local per- 
sonalities. Give them the chance to do 
commercials in their own style. 

6. Don't fail to supervise local shows 
carefully. Over-enthusiastic talent can 
go beyond copy claims you authorize, 
causes FTC trouble. 

7. Don't buy on the basis of power 
or affiliation alone. These important 
characteristics of stations shouldn t 
blind buyers to other factors. 

8. Don't buy, as a matter of fact, on 
the basis of any one or two factors. 
Good buys are based on a study of all 
the facts. 

9. Don't fail to supply the timebuy- 
er (if you're an advertiser or account 
executive) with all the marketing and 
other strategic information available. 

1(1. Don't tie the timebuyer's hands 
(if you're a client), by insisting on 
approval of each buy. In the interim, 
good bins ma\ he -napped up. 

Type of spot time spon- 
sors are buying most 

Q. What's the outlook for one- 
minute announcements? 

A. Station representatives and time- 
buyers report this form of spot radio 
is currently most sought after. The 



low-cost factor, relative ease with 
which timebuyers can book them ^com- 
pared to programs!, and fact that a 
lot of "sell"' can be squeezed into that 
60 seconds of precious time, all con- 
tribute to their popularity. 

Q. How are station-breaks faring? 

A. People in the trade say there is a 
"considerable"' trend away from pur- 
chase of station-breaks, with the plav 
going to one-minute announcements. 
Why? Typical of those surveyed was 
the comment of Wells Barnett, John 
Blair & Company: "Because more spon- 
sors are favoring the greater amount 
of 'sell' you can pack into one-minute 
announcements." 



Q. What's the outlook for three- 
minute periods? 

A. Virtually non-existent. A few spon- 
sors, like Chevrolet, once used extend- 
ed commercial periods. But, having 
achieved uniformity of time slotting, 
stations now don't particularly encour- 
age the use of these periods. 



Q. What's new in double and 
triple spotting? 

A. By and large, station representa- 
tives and timebuyers are urging more 
stations to dispense with this type of 
squeeze play. They reason, it's bad for 
the station and certainly bad for the 
sponsor. A listener hearing too many 
commercials, one after the other, is apt 
to turn off his radio set in disgust. 



Saturation buys 

Q. What's the trend in spot satu- 
ration buys? 

A. The infiltration of TV notwith- 
standing, you can expect sponsors to 
I Please turn to page 85) 



KLIX 



In one of the west's 

RICHEST MARKETS 

Idaho's Fabulous Magic Valley 

Ask Hollingbery I 

ABC at Frank C. Mclntyre 

Ttcin Falls. Idaho V. P. and Gen. Mgr. 



£2 



SPONSOR 






••^sT 



ysrs 



ft r* 



1 






•v 



THE BARE 
FACTS 



Tremendous negro, rural and religious audiences — These three sections 
of Georgia population form the basis of Georgia's two "Three R" stations. 
WEAS in Atlanta and WJIV in Savannah, the first two markets in Georgia. 
These three elements constitute the overwhelming majority of the pop- 
ulation. Only WEAS and WJIV give you a complete coverage of Georgia's 



"huyingest" audience. 



J$& a 7/eney qfa £et'7fa- 



WEAS and its 10,000 watts blanket the heavily populated Atlanta area 
and environs. WJIV (Savannah) and its 1,000 watt coverage brings in 
the rich costal plains population. Advertisers need not look further when 
they seek the most important part of the South's biggest market — the 
three R's. The Family Stations pay off in results! 

IDEAS WJIV 

10,000 w * 1010 kc y /C-K^^^'X) 100 ° w # 900 KC 

///4^*^*<~ ^C^^M^I £s»*lS*A+±**» 



%& Savannah 



THE FAMILY ^STATIONS 



16 JULY 1951 



83 



Network programs aval 


table on 


local stations 


( 


rcid 


to) 




TITLE 


TYPE 


APPEAL 


NET 




TIME 


TESTED 


EXPLANATION 




MARTIN AGRONSKY 


News 


General 


ABC 


IS 


mln. 


6/wk 




yes 


Early morning commentary from Washington 




AMERICA'S TOWN MEETING 


Forum 


General 


ABC 


45 


min. 


l/wk 




yes 


George V. Denny Jr. and guest speakers 




BERT ANDREWS 


News 


General 


ABC 


15 


mln. 


l/wk 




yes 


News and Interviews 




CECIL BROWN 


News 


Family 


MBS 


15 


min. 


5/wk 




yes 


Commentator 




ELMER DAVIS 


News 


General 


ABC 


15 


min. 


5/wk 




yes 


News interpretation 




PAULINE FREDERICK 


News 


General 


ABC 


10 


min. 


5/wk 




yes 


Woman news analyst 




PAUL HARVEY 


News 


General 


ABC 


15 


min. 


5/wk 




yes 


News analyst from Chicago 




HEADLINE EDITION 


News 


General 


ABC 


10 


mln. 


5/wk 




yes 


Narrated by Taylor Grant 




AL HELFER'S SPORTS 


DIGEST 


Sports 


Male 


MBS 


15 


min. 


l/wk 




yes 


Inside news of sports 




ROBERT HURLEIGH 


News 


Family 


MBS 


15 


min. 


5/wk 




yes 


Commentator 




LADIES FAIR 


Variety 


Female 


MBS 


25 


min. 


5/wk 




yes 


Audience participation quiz 




TED MALONE 


News 


General 


ABC 


15 


min. 


5/wk 




yes 


Human interest news 




MR. PRESIDENT 


Drama 


Family 


ABC 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




yes 


Incidents In lives of U. S. presidents with Edward 


Ai null 


MUTUAL NEWSREEL 


News 


Family 


MBS 


15 


min. 


5 wk 




yes 


On-the-spot news 




MARY MARGARET McBRIDE 


Interviews 


General 


ABC 


30 


min. 


5/wk 




yes 


Unusual Interviews 




NO SCHOOL TODAY 


Children's Show Juvenile 


ABC 


60 


mln. 


l/wk 




yes 


Eat. morning funfest 




PERFECT HUSBAND 


Aud. Partic. 


General 


ABC 


30 


min. 


5/wk 




yes 


George Renneman. M.C. 




PIANO PLAYHOUSE 


Music 


General 


ABC 


30 


mln. 


l/wk 




yes 


Piano music 




POOLE'S PARADISE 


Variety 


Family 


MBS 


55 


nin. 


5/wk 




yes 


Music and views 




ROGUE'S GALLERY 


Drama 


Family 


ABC 


30 


nin. 


l/wk 




yes 


Private-eye drama 




GEORGE SOKOLSKY 


News 


General 


ABC 


15 


mln. 


l/wk 




yes 


Weekly commentary 




HARRY WISMER 


Sports 


General 


ABC 


15 


mln. 


l/wk 




yes 


Weekly sports round-up 





NO. 1 RET Ait, SAf.ES OPM'ORTliVMTr 



li\ MNBMA1XA! 



Only WWCA Gat y 9 Indiana 



WWtA. 



Programmed locally to over 
400,000 responsive listen- 
ers . . . 50,000 rural people, 
30,000 Negroes, 100,000 
industrial workers and four 
nationality groups. Polish- 
Creek-Croatian-Serbian. 



The 


only rad 


io 


station 


serv- 


ing 


and sclli 


"g 


all the 


rich 


Lake-Porter 


C 


ounty 


mar- 


ket. 











WWCA- 



1000 WATTS FULLTIME 
1270 KC 

Dee O. Coe 

President-General Manager 

Hotel Gary — Phone 9171 



84 



SPONSOR 



launch heavy radio saturation cam- 
paigns this fall in both TV and non- 
TV markets. The reasons: (1) to ex- 
ploit seasonal sales demands; (2) to 
promote products at a special period 
of the week; (3) to sell mass-demand 
goods ahead of competitors; (4) to 
launch new products. Falling into cat- 
egory 1 are advertisers like Robert 
Hall Clothes, who will be using spot 
radio in markets throughout the na- 
tion to win the back-to-school trade, to 
sell goods designed particularly for 
autumn, to woo pre-Christmas buyers. 
In category 2 are advertisers like 
Life, which is launching an announce- 
ment campaign in 70 markets sched- 
uled for Thursdays, Fridays, and Sat- 
urdays, as copies of the magazine hit 
newsstands in the various markets. In 
category 3 are advertisers like Lever 
Brothers, stepping up its spot radio for 
Rinso in 70 markets, for Spry in 75 
markets, in order to battle hard against 
stiff competition from P&G and Col- 
gate. I In the same category is Blatz 
Brewing Company, which hopes to 
gain suds supremacy with the aid of 
saturation spot radio come fall.) Typ- 
ical of category 4 is Protam, a nutri- 
tional supplement for people who diet, 
which is currently launching a spot ra- 
dio campaign over 200 stations to fa- 
miliarize the public with the brand 
name. 



Singing commercials 



Q. Do singing commercials still 
have a potent sales punch? 

A. The answer from agency people, 
researchers, and singing commercial 
writers is an unqualified "yes." Jerry 
Bess, vice president of the Frank B. 
Sawdon agency ( which handles the 
Robert Hall commercials!, says: "Jin- 
gles and singing commercials are as 
popular as ever. Brighter jingles are 
what everyone is seeking and to main- 
tain singing commercial popularity the 
main idea is to 'keep your commercials 
fresh'." 

Lanny Grey of the famous Lanny 
and Ginger Grey commercial writing 
duo adds some background. "There 
was a decline in the use of singing 
commercials in 1949 when everyone 
was sitting back and waiting to see 
what would happen in TV. But, in 
1950, when advertisers with limited 
budgets realized TV was for big pock- 
etbooks and that radio was here to 




MAINE 



BROADCASTING 



SYSTEM 



to -the 
BUY-WAYS 

of Maine 



^ 






WCSH 

PORTLAND 
1925 



4 ". Tf .-■'''■ '" 



WRD0 

AUGUSTA 
1932 



WLBZ 

BANGOR 
1926 



HOW TO COVER 
A THRIFTY STATE 

Few states have more diversified industries 
than has Maine with 1363, not including 
agriculture and commercial fishing. 

People prosper better when their dollars 
and their labors are invested in many enter- 
prises. 

The Maine Broadcasting System stations 
serve more of the homes of Maine's em- 
ployed men and women than any other 
radio group.* They speak regularly to 
these thrifty people who know values, buy 
wisely and enjoy the good life. 



<BMB Stu.h -: 



mmnE broadcastim systeiji 



Represented by 



WEED & COMPANY 
Nationally 



BERTHA BANNAN 
New England 



16 JULY 1951 



85 



MM 

3B 



renewals . . . 






"National, Regional, Local — Sponsors 

Renew for AP Newscasts' 

"Sponsors stay with WAVE newscasts. For instanct 
Mid-Continent Oil is now in its fourth year. Commo^ 
wealth Life of Kentucky is now in its fifth. Bon 
Clothes and Studebaker are both completing the! 
sixth year. 

"WAVE uses Associated Press exclusively for will 
news. But WAVE has its own newsgathering staff c 
four trained, full-time reporters for Louisville news, d 
one year AP used more than 100 stories phoned ml 
WAVE newsmen. AP news partnership pays both wayt 






Jim Caldwell, News Editor 
WAVE, Louisville, Ky 





"As Necessary to Us 

As Our Transmitter" 

"Sponsors want prestige and listener appeal. Associ- 
ated Press news gives them both — plus a mass of 
listeners who are conscious of the product advertised. 
Also, AP news gives our 'casts high ratings." 

Charles C. Smith, General Manager, 
WDEC, Americus, Ga. 



m 






I mHm 



■-.-:-■''■•■ 
— ••"••"•■->'■'*' 



'Has" 



-zzmmM 



«■ 



SBbHw 



revenue . . . 



■■':'.'■'■' 






i 



"160 AP Newscasts 

Sponsored Weekly" 

"Since WITH was established 10 years ago, we ha|| 
used Associated Press news continuously, most of I 
time exclusively. Our AP membership has been a gr| 
satisfaction to us. Our AP service has produced 
important results . . satisfied sponsors . . . anrj 
great deal of station revenue." 

Thomas Tinsley, Preside^ 
WITH, Baltimore, 



Renewals, ratings and revenue all attest the selling power of AP 
news. Hundreds of the country's finest stations announce with pride 



THIS STATION IS A MEMBER II 



I ■ ■ i 



iSf^s 




tC^ 

-/ 



*** 



Nf 



/ 



Associated Press . . . constantly on the job with 

• a news report of 1,000,000 words every 24 
hours! 

• leased news wires of 350,000 miles in U.S. 
alone! 

• exclusive state-by-state news circuits! 

• offices throughout the world! 

• 100 news bureaus in the U.S.! 

• staff of 7200 augmented by member stations 
and newspapers ... more than 100,000 men 
and women contributing daily! 



Accuracy, truth and live-wire reporting 
have established The Associated Press as 
the world's greatest news service. Alert 
broadcasting of AP news builds peak listen- 
ership for stations and sponsors. Faithful 
audiences have confidence in AP news... 
and they have confidence, too, in the prod- 
ucts linked with AP's reputation for 
dependability. 

And... AP's accurate, live-wire coverage 
is available to broadcasters on a cost-of- 
service basis. 

For full information on how you can get 
the benefits of AP news service... WRITE 
TODAY. 



RADIO DIVISION 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

50 Rockefeller Plaza. New York 20, N.Y. 



ASSOCIATED PRESS. 



A/ow. . . 

MORE POWER 



on 



WGTC 

5000 W Day 
1000 W Night 
Directional 

* 

MORE LISTENERS 

on 

WGTC 

New, clear signal tremendously 
increases coverage, attracts 
greater audience and more lis- 
teners, sells more buyers. 



SAME LOW RATES 

on 

WGTC 

Greater power, broader cover- 
age, more sales, at practically 
same low rates for former local 
coverage. 



MORE FOR YOUR 
MONEY 

on 

WGTC 

GREENVILLE, N. C. 

Full Time — 1 590 Kc 
Mutual Affiliate 

Nationally Represented By 

John E. Pearson Company 



stay, they turned to singing commer- 
cials and they're as popular as ever." 
Len Kudisch reports listeners tested 
by Schwerin Research Corporation 
definitely have no prejudice against 
singing commercials. When Schwerin 
recently analyzed singing commercials 
for several big name clients, audience 
reaction was favorable. One of the fa- 
vorites: a Campbell Soup Company 
commercial heard on Club 15, CBS 
musical show. 



Q. What types of singing commer- 
cials are popular? 

A. Commercials will continue to stress 
waltz, samba, or polka backgrounds. 
Occasional hillbilly or inarch tunes 
back up vocal renditions. 

Robert Hall Clothes Inc. presently 
has a woman's commercial played to 
the tune of "Strolling Through the 
Park One Day"; men's sales pitch to 
"When the Value Goes Up-Up-Up." 
Roy Ross of WNEW informs that the 
famous Miles Shoe commercials origi- 
nally featuring a male Negro quartet 
and rhythm section now use five voices 
I two girls, three men) with a two pic- 
colo-one trombone accompaniment. 
The George R. Nelson agency of Sche- 
nectady, advertising specialists for 
such famous advertiser names as Pep- 
si-Cola; General Electric (Syracuse) ; 
National Dairy; Fedders-Quigan; Mo- 
hawk Carpet and Blue Coal, employs 
as many as 11 people in some of their 
commercial renditions (trio, girl solo- 
ist, guitar, piano, bass drums, trom- 
bone, trumpet, and violinist). 



Q. What does a singing commer- 
cial cost? 

A. Lanny and Ginger Grey offer a 
complete recorded jingle series for six 
months local use for as little as $850. 
This includes: creation and writing of 
jingle and six months usage; all pro- 
duction and recording costs; finished 
masler and pressing; one or two 
voices; instrumental trio background. 
The subsequent local usage rate is only 
$385 for each successive six months 
period. 

There's no limit to costs. Produc- 
tion costs, musicians paid at AFRA 
scale, type of talent used, and whether 
advertiser is local, regional or nation- 
al, all add to the price tag. But an ef- 
fective singing commercial can be 
made to fit any size budget. 



Q. Who are some of the advertis- 
ers using singing commercials? 

A. The list reads like a Who's Who 
of American Industry with names like 
Shell Oil; Sonotone; Mohawk Carpet; 
Barney's; Pabst; St. Joseph's Aspirin; 
Cresta Blanca Wines; Twentieth Cen- 
tury Fox; Minute Maid and a host of 
local advertisers. In fact, it is these 
small local advertisers who are spon- 
soring jingles covering Mother's Day; 
Valentine's Day, Easter, Graduation 
Day and other such occasions. World 
Broadcasting System reports its mem- 
ber stations selling these special occa- 
sion musical rhymings to advertisers 
in these categories: credit jewelers; 
confectionery stores; drug stores; de- 
partment stores and other merchants 
who run three or four week campaigns 
prior to the special occasion itself. 



Transcriptions 



Q. Are national advertisers in- 
creasing their purchase of tran- 
scribed syndicated programs? 

A. Yes. National advertisers are plac- 
ing more and more money into local 
and regional markets in order to aug- 
ment their network TV coverage. In 
the trend toward spot and low-budget- 
ed night shows, transcribed syndicated 
programs such as those sold by Ziv, 
MGM Radio Attractions, RCA Record- 
ing, and Goodman are finding an ever- 
increasing market. 

The Frederic W. Ziv Company, 
which had a one-program beginning in 
1937, today produces 24 syndicated 
programs for which sponsors annually 
pay $12,000,000, heard over more than 
1,000 stations. From 12 national ad- 
vertisers in 1946, they now boast well 
over 120, many on a co-op basis. 
Among them are Coca Cola. RCA, Le- 
ver Brothers, Westinghouse, Ford, 
Kaiser-Frazer, Chrysler, Pontiac, Bor- 
den, Motorola and P&G. 

Autumn business is definitely on the 
upgrade for the program transcribers. 
A. B. Sambrook, manager of RCA Re- 
corded Program Services, told spon- 



IDAHO'S 

MOST POWERFUL 

10,000 WATTS 

K G e m 

BOISE, 185,000 CUSTOMERS 



88 



SPONSOR 



"We're from Milwaukee and we want you to see 
that your $ $ $ go farthest on WE MP" 

HIGH HOOPERS! LOWER RATE! 

PROBLEM: How to budget $125.00 per week in 
Milwaukee? 

ANSWER: On WEMP:* 

$108 per week buys 14 - 1 Min. or 100-word Announcements 
for 52 weeks 

5 ti. weekly in the "Coffee Club", 3.5 Hooperating 

5 ti. weekly in the "1340 Club", 4.6 Hooperating 

4 ti. weekly in the "Old Timers Party", 4.2 Hooperating 

Total Daily — 12.3 Hooperating 

Total Weekly — 57.3 Hooperating 




« 



ON NET STATION #1* 

$122.50 Buys 5 - 100-word Announcements for 52 weeks 
5 ti. weekly in the Early Morning Show, 6.6 Hooperating 
Total Daily— 6.6 Hooperating 
Total Weekly— 33.0 Hooperating 

Note: computation is for 100 word, on Network Station -, t , 

cost would be $203.75 per week. *"' ' M,n ' 



*All Hooperatings based on Ocl-Fcb, 1951 
Comprehensive using highest individual 15- 
minute strip rating, 8:00 A.M.-6-.00 P.M. 




For $50, $75, $100, $150 or more, you can buy 

2 times the audience of Network Station —1 

2V2 times the audience of Network Station rr2 

)oin other shrewd national advertisers using high-rated, low-cost saturation 

schedules on one of the nation's strongest independent stations! 



WEMP 



24 HOURS OF MUSIC, NEWS AND SPORTS 

HUGH BOICE, General Mgr. • HEADLEY REED. National Rep. 



16 JULY 1951 



89 



SOR: '"If all present indications mate- 
rialize, this fall will be the biggest year 
in RCA Syndicated Program sales." 
RCA Syndicated Programs began in 
1937 with three program series; now 
has 26 programs being carried over 
255 stations. Fifteen national advertis- 
ers are among its current clients, in- 
cluding Frigidaire. General Electric, 
Philco, P&G, Lever Brothers, RCA Vic- 
tor (mostly on a co-op basis). 

Harry S. Goodman Radio Produc- 
tions tallies hundreds of advertisers, 
national and local, buying over 18 



shows. Pepsi Cola. Lever Brothers, 
Lambert Pharmacal (Listerine), Ster- 
ling Drugs, Dolcin. General Foods, 
Swift & Company, American Home 
Products are numbered among its na- 
tional clients, present and past. 

Charles Michelson. Inc., whose more 
than 20 programs are heard on nu- 
merous stations, reports program sales 
to such sponsors as End's Fruit Salts, 
Blackstone Washing Machine Corpo- 
ration, and the Kentucky Utilities Com- 
pany. 

Jo Ransom, publicity director for 



WHOD... 



is proud to announce 

it is 

Movin' around with Smilin' Mary Dee 

WHOD's Sellm'est Female D.j. 




Smilin' Mary Dee 
Pittsburgh's Super Female D.J. 

This year marks the 3rd anniversary in WHOD's public service activity. 
The Mary Dee Program started with the birth of the station. 

WHOD . . . 

is also proud to announce the opening of its new Mary Dee Studios 
at Centre and Herron Avenues, in the heart of Pittsburgh's well 
heeled Hill district, August 1st. 

WHOD ■ ■ ■ The station of nations 

250 watts 8 50 on every Pittsburgh dial 



Beams programs to Polish — S!ova'< — Jewish — Italian — Greek 
Croatian — Hungarian — Negro — Lithuanian. 



Arabi 



— WRITE FOR SALES CASE HISTORIES - 
Represented Nationally By 

JOE WOOTON 
INTERSTATE UNITED NEWSPAPERS, INC. 

545 Fifth Ave. 

NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MGM Radio Attractions, whose pro- 
grams are heard over more than 200 
stations from coast to coast, reported : 
"We have had constant renewals, and 
a wide variety of advertisers, local as 
well as national." 

Teleways, Los Angeles, features such 
programs as Barnyard Jamboree and 
John Charles Thomas. Morton Pro- 
ductions. Chicago, have done well with 
The Westerners and This Is the Story. 



Q. Are top-notch transcribed 
shows available to national adver- 
tisers? 

A. Although transcription firms offer 
a variety of programs (mystery, musi- 
cal, soap opera) the national advertiser 
faces the problem of availabilities in 
all the markets he may be interested 
in. Few new transcribed shows are be- 
ing produced. Those on the market are 
already well tied up in many areas. 
But an advertiser can do one of several 
things: He might pick a new show, se- 
lecting all the markets he's interested in 
covering before local or regional cli- 
ents have bought many of them. He 
might have a show produced exclusive- 
ly for his use. He might have a pro- 
gram tailor-made to his specifications. 
The problem of long-term shows, 52 
episodes or more, has eased consider- 
ably with production of fewer shows 
and more episodes done by responsi- 
ble producers. The advertiser need no 
longer sign off for want of continuing 
episodes. 



Q, Does a transcribed program 
cost the advertiser more now than 
before? 

A. No. Increase in talent fees by 
something like 100%, processing in- 
creases and other factors contributing 
to higher cost of the finished product 
are felt very little by the advertiser. 
Basic reason is volume sales. Where 
a transcribed show once was consid- 
ered a great success if sponsored in 
some 200 markets, moderately success- 
ful shows now have 300-400 regional 
and/or local sponsors. An advertiser 
can get a transcribed show for from 
$3 to $350 and higher per episode, 
depending upon market and station. 



Q. How popular are transcribed 
programs in comparison to net- 
work offerings and live local 
shows? 



90 



SPONSOR 




FALL 

. . WINTER 
AFTER WINTER 



HIGH It VMM.* and LOW RATES make 



Independent \\ M IE 



to«!L^&8Sr^ 



1/ 



ltl wo 



* * 



. . . ONE OF THE RICHEST MARKETS IN THE UNITED STATES! 

When You Plan Your Fall and Winter Selling, Remember This . . . 

IN COMPETITION WITH FOUR NETWORK 

STATIONS, FROM 8 A. M. TO 6 P. M., 

INDEPENDENT WNEB HAS MORE LISTENERS 

THAN THREE OF THESE STATIONS COMBINED! * 

These Are Top Ratings You Can Get Your Hands On. 
In Time Periods That Are Available To You. 

THIS YEAR RLY U \ lit. THE WORCESTER STATION THAT SELLS! 

* Hooper Reports Oct. 1949-Feb. 1950 
Oct. 1950-Feb. 1951 



WORCESTER 
MASSACHUSETTS 

NEW ENGLAND'S LEADING INDEPENDENT IN NEW ENGLAND'S THIRD LARGEST MARKET 

Represented by: The Boiling Company, Inc. and Kettell-Carter, Inc. 




16 JULY 1951 



91 



Separate 

But 

i^aual 

WERD 

Proves A Moot 
Southern Point in Atlanta 

'"Separate but equal", — 
that famous phrase heard 
but seldom seen, came true, 
Hooper-wise for WERD in 
May, 8:00 AM to 12 noon- 
Monday through Friday. 

WERD'S Hooper Audience share 
equals the best station in Atlanta 
today. Here are the Hoopered 
facts : 



WERD 

Station A 

Station B 

Station C 



—23.2 
—23.2 
—19.7 
—10.6 



Other AM and FM —23.2 

WERD is the most economical 
radio buy in Atlanta. 860 on 
every Atlanta dial covers the 

area shown below 1000 

watts.. 



Contour of WERDville 




Write for proof of performance 

Represented nationally by 

JOE WOOTTON 

Interstate United Newspapers, 
Inc. 

545 Fifth Avenue 
New York 17, N. Y. 

"WERD is Negro owned and operated. 



A. Transcribed programs, with their 
big-name stars and big-budgeted, 
smooth productions, are today more 
popular than ever. Standout of the 
past year has been Ziv's Bold Venture, 
starring Humphrey Bogart and Lau- 
ren Bacall, heard on 500 stations. A 
breakdown of its varied types of spon- 
sors reveals: brewers 35%; auto deal- 
ers, 10%; food products, 9%; furni- 



ture stores, 



laundries, 7' 



ap- 



pliance dealers, 4%. In Shreveport, 
La., Bold Venture had a 20.2 rating — 
twice as high as competing shows at 
the same period, whether net or local- 
ly originated, also double the rating 
of the shows that preceded it. Another 
Ziv program, the Guy Lombardo 
Show, had an 11.2 rating in Omaha 
Sunday afternoon — topping all its 
competitors combined, and almost 
three times the rating of both the pre- 
ceding and following shows on the 
same time schedule. 

According to Bennett S. Rosner, ad- 
vertising manager for RCA Record- 
ings: "Our programs normally do as 
well, often better, from a rating stand- 
point than network offerings. For ex- 
ample, A House in the Country got a 
higher rating in Portland, Ore., than 
the network Jack Benny Show which 
played against it." Other high-rated 
RCA shows: Aunt Mary, 11.4 in Oma- 
ha, Neb.; The Haunting Hour, 8.5 in 
San Francisco. 

MGM shows, like The Story of Dr. 
Kildare, The Adventures of Maisie, 
The Hardy Family, Crime Does Not 
Pay, At Home With Lionel Barrymore, 
nab uniformly high ratings. MGM is 
particularly proud of the honors award- 
ed to its shows; MGM Theatre of the 
Air recently won a citation at the Ohio 
State University Education by Radio 
Institute. 

One of the Goodman shows, Let 
George Do It, featuring private eye 
George Valentine, has consistently 
ranked among the top 5 on the Pacific 
Coast and for 20 out of 27 months 
led all Pacific Networks in ratings. 
Popularity of Goodman shows is also 
hypoed by promotional stunts. Re- 
cently ,when its Red Ryder, sponsored 
by the R. L. Zeigler Packing Com- 
pany, was heard on WTBC, Tuscaloo- 
sa, Ala., the station leased two movie 
theatres for the exhibition of Red Ry- 
der movies. For admission, each 
youngster had to submit one wrapping 
for a Zeigler product. Over 1,700 kids 
packed the two theatres. 

Included in the variety of popular 



offerings available to national, local 
and regional advertisers is the Beatrice 
Kay Show. A Richard H. Ullman, Inc. 
( Buffalo I program, it features song- 
stress Beatrice Kay, vocalist Artie Mal- 
vin, large male chorus and guest stars. 
Available: 156 quarter-hour programs. 
A complete promotion kit with a test- 
ed kick-off promotion gimmick goes 
with the show. Teleways Radio Pro- 
ductions Inc., Hollywood, offers com- 
edy with Tom, Dick and Harry plus a 
variety of other transcribed availabili- 
ties including: Riders of the Purple 
Sage; John Charles Thomas, and 
Strange Wills. 



Q. What type of program seems 
most popular? 

A. Mystery-adventure shows on the 
order of Five Minute Mysteries (RCA) 
and Mystery House (Goodman) seem 
to be to the fore currently. But there's 
also a heavy demand for juveniles, like 
Dick Cole at Far Military Academy 
( Michelson ) , folk music like Burl Ives 
Show (Goodman), and Westerns like 
Cisco Kid ( Ziv ) . 



Q. How costly will transcribed 
programs be this fall? 

A. They will vary, depending on the 
size of the market, and, in some cases, 
the station. Bold Venture, for exam- 
ple, could cost $15 per half-hour pro- 
gram in a rural market, but $750 in 
New York City. An RCA program 
v/ill range from $4 to over $200. 



Network co-op .shows 



Q. What is the fall outlook for 
network co-op programs? 

A. Here's one segment of radio that's 
picking up billings left and right. Bert 
Hauser, co-op director of Mutual 
Broadcasting System, reports sales are 
up 66% over last year. Summer bill- 
ings are well ahead of spring, and the 
fall promises to be the top season in 



JOE ADAMS 

REACHES ALL 

NEGROES 

IN LOS ANGELES 

Kf\ \ « » | 50C0 WATTS 

\J YV L CLEAR CHANNEL 
LOS ANGELES - SANTA MONICA. CALIF 



92 



SPONSOR 



MBS history. News programs are defi- 
nitely generating the greatest interest 
with between six and seven hundred 
sponsors picking up the tab for Fulton 
Lewis, Jr. on 376 stations. Word from 
ABC is that bills are now going out to 
788 sponsors, against 587 using this 
medium a year ago. On a dollar basis, 
ABC billings are ujt 43 r v over last 
year. National advertisers who are 
snapping up these availabilities include 
Socony-Vacuum, Sinclair Oil. Interna- 
tional Harvester, and American Vis- 
cose Corp. The Amalgamated Clothing 
Workers of America I CIO I sponsor 
"American Forum of the Air in New 
York City, Washington, and Detroit. 
Further indications of the war-nerves 
of the country may be seen in the 
number of sponsors who have signed 
up for ABC co-op news programs: 
Paul Harvey 1 95 I , Headline Edition 
193), Elmer Davis (84), and Martin 
Agronsky (131). Pauline Frederick, 
woman analyst available only in East- 
ern and Central time zones, has more 
than half a hundred sponsors, includ- 
ing department stores, household ap- 
pliance outlets, cleaners, and laundries. 
One reason for greater interest in 
co-op programing is that sponsors who 
have tossed a bundle into TV shows 
in metropolitan areas are using co-op 
as a form of insurance. Cost-conscious 
advertisers are endeavoring to pinpoint 
their efforts through spot and co-op 
programs. NBC and CBS, each of 
whom have a couple of news shows 
available on co-op basis, are rumored 
to be getting ready to jump in with 
both feet. 



Library services 



Q. What's the fall outlook for ad- 
vertisers in sponsorship of pro- 
grams already prepared and script- 
ed by library services (available via 
radio stations)? 

A. With a sharp trend toward music 
and news, more advertisers are buying 
these top talent music shows, expertlv 
built and scripted, and easily adapted 
to selling on the local radio station lev- 
el. A library service today is more 
than an indexed collection of records. 
It consists of a series of open-end high- 
fidelity radio transcriptions along with 
professionally written scripts offering 
local announcers record cues, continu- 
ity, and other program aids. 

When an advertiser buys a series 



WIBC 



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Within WIBC's 0.5 MV contour live 1,068,166 
radio families* . . . with total buying power of 
$4,985,952,850.00.** 

*1949 BMB 
**1950 Sales Management Survey of Buying Power 



Ask your John Blair 
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BASIC 

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The Friendly 
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16 JULY 1951 



93 



YOU SELL 

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MAMMOTH 
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when you buy . . . 



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The Station They All Listen To 



CLEVELAND 

.... "The Family Station" 
serving Clevelanders and 
all the local nationalities 
in the 3rd most densely 
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district in the U. S. A. ... 
covering 336 square miles. 

.... Ask Forjoe for the 
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about the effective WSRS 
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lowest in town, thus the 
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with 

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an HID k 
covers 

The Big 

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Market 

and 

BUSINESS 

IS 

WONDERFUL 



from a station, he gets nationally 
known talent at low cost, plus a con- 
tinuing, integrated series of programs 
of network music show calibre. Nine 
leading library companies service sta- 
tions with these programs: Associated 
Program Service, New York; Capitol 
Records, Hollywood; Lang-Worth Fea- 
ture Programs, New York; C. P. Mac- 
Gregor, Los Angeles; RCA Recorded 
Program Services (Thesaurus Shows I . 
New York; Sesac, New York; Stand- 
ard Radio Transcription Services, New 
York; World Broadcasting System, 
New York. 



Q. What sponsors are buying li- 
brary service programs? 

A. Regional and local advertisers are 
the heaviest users, but an increasing 
number of national advertisers are us- 
ing them. too. World, which services 
800 subscriber stations, lists among its 
typical sponsors Philip's "66" Oil 
Company, Kaiser-Frazer, Borden Ice 
Cream, and Bendix TV. RCA Thesau- 
rus, which services over 500 subscrib- 
er stations, boasts of 18 national ad- 
vertisers (largely on a dealer co-op ba- 
sis), including Dodge. Ford, Coca Co- 
la, Philco, Borden. Lang-Worth Fea- 
ture Programs lists Robert Hall. Sears 
Roebuck, Kelvinator. Associated Pro- 
gram Service lists Westinghouse Deal- 
ers, Household Finance Corp.. Thyo- 
vals Vitamins, Todd's Appliances. 
Standard and others have comparable 
lists of national sponsors. 



Q. What sort of shows can a spon- 
sor buy? 

A. A vast variety, be it religious mu- 
sic, Spanish music. Dixie Land jazz, or 
what have you. World, which also of- 
fers gift-occasion and seasonal jingles, 
has headliners like Dick Haymes and 
Russ Morgan, patriotic music and 
readings, like Forivard America, river- 
boat music, like Steamboat Jamboree. 
RCA is proud of Wayne King Serenade 
which got a 34.5 rating in Mankato. 
Minn.; Church in the Wildwood, with 
a 28.1 rating in Fort Wayne, Ind. As- 
sociated- Program Service has dinner 
music, like Candlelight and Silver: 
show tunes, like Curtain Calls. Capitol 
has a neat Western serenade, Andy 
Parker and the Plainsmen; a King Cole 
Dixieland combo. Lang-Worth has 
classical music, The Concert Hour, as 
well as falk. Riders of the Purple Sage. 
\l.i< ■( r i < ■ u < > t has Inii-i /rami and a />')// 



94 



SPONSOR 



Showcase of Music. Sesac offers late 
evening dreamy music. Starlight So- 
nata and a Mister Muggins Rabbit for 
the small fry. Standard provides a 
Sports Parade and Hollywood Calling 
— narrative mingled with music. Bruce 
Eells & Associates, of Hollywood, offer 
a range from Pinto Peter in Arizona 
to Thrills From Great Operas. These 
are only samples. Each library has 
many more — representing an excep- 
tional low-cost programing opportunity 
for the economy-minded sponsor. 

VM radio 

Q. What's the fall outlook for 
frequency modulation radio? 

A. Frequency modulation radio, with 
its emphasis on fine music, fidelity in 
reproduction and freedom from static, 
is a real boon to discriminating listen- 
ers. But from a commercial and audi- 
ence viewpoint, only a handful of FM 
stations have anything to chirp about. 
Recently, General Electric Appliances, 
Inc., signed a 26-week sponsorship of 
Symphony Hall each Fridav night over 
the AM and FM stations of WQXR. 
New York. At the same time, other 
General Electric distributors contract- 
ed for the same program on the 13 FM 
stations of the Rural Radio Network 
in New York State. Powerful WMIT. 
near Charlotte, N. C. finds business so 
promising it is on the air more than 
16 hours daily and covers portions of 
six states. Paul R. Benson, production 
manager of KAYL-FM. Storm Lake. 
Iowa, reports that 28.8' < of the homes 
in Buena Vista County are FM- 
equipped. and that the station received 
452 phone calls requesting tunes on a 
musical party it conducted. While some 
FM stations have folded, other sta- 
tions, like WASH and WGMS-FM, 
Washington. D. C. WFLN, Philadel- 
phia, and KOCY-FM. Oklahoma City, 
are thriving. So is energetic WFMA 
in Rocky Mount, N. C. And some sec- 
tions report a minor boom in the sale 
of kits for quality FM tuners and am- 
plifiers. However, FM is still suffering 
from advertising malnutrition due to 
lack of circulation. 



Q. What sort of circulation can a 
sponsor get on FM radio? 

A. Industry spokesmen say that 7 1 / 4% 
of the home sets in the L nited States — 
or roughly 9,000.000 — are capable of 
tuning to FM. Receivers are usually 



FM-onlv table models; FM-AM phono- 
graphs; and TV-FM. The chief diffi- 
culty is. though, tbat not enough IM- 
AM receivers are being distributed in 
areas where the demand is heaviest. 
Between April and May. 1951, the FM 
Department of the National Associa- 
tion of Radio and Television Broad- 
casters surveyed 123 wholesale radio 
distributors in 41 cities of 18 states. 
Thirty-six of the 41 distribution areas 
queried — or 88' < — reported manufac- 
turers' shipments inadequate. Nearl) 
half of those queried (60) reported 



that the demand for FM-AM models 

c\<r< -d.-d the supplx . < <'in' identalh . 
as a sign of FM's market potential, 
To', of the 123 distributors belie\ed 
that the demand for FM reception is 
greater in rural than in metropolitan 
areas — especially in small (owns 40 
miles beyond the range of major net- 
work reception. 



Q. What's being done to improve 
FM's circulation? 

A. \n encouraging sign forecasting 




i 



NBC Affiliates 




in ALASKA! 

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GILBERT A. WELLINGTON. Nat'l Adv. Mgr. 
5546 White-Henry Stuart Bldq., Seattle 



ADAM J. YOUNG. Jr.. Inc.. East. Rep. 
New York • Chicago 



16 JULY 1951 



95 



BacR 

inihe 
Saddle 
Again ! 




Yes, the "Bellowing Bow- 
legged Boy/' Biff Collie, 
comes back to K-NUZ July 
1st. Biff, one of K-NUZ's top 
stars, returns with "Collie's 
Corral;' 11:00 AM to 1:00 
PM dailv, and ""Houston 
Hoedown," 7:00 to 10:00 
PM nightly. 

Step up your sales with a 
proven air salesman who has 
made record-breaking sales 
and Hooper historv on K-NUZ 
— Biff Collie! 

For Information Call 
FORJOE 

National Representative 

or DAVE MORRIS 
General Manager 
at KEystone 2581 

"RADIO RANCH" -'• 

P. O. BOX 2135 
TWX HO 414 




future amity and promotional co-op- 
eration between FM broadcasters and 
manufacturers was a meeting repre- 
sentatives of both parties held in late 
June in Washington, D. C. 

At first, there was some disagree- 
ment on reports of distribution, a man- 
ufacturers' survey showing there were 
at least 145,059 FM-AM radios in dis- 
tributors' inventories and an addition- 
al 42.372 in factory inventories. How- 
ever, in going through the manufac- 
turers' tallies such oddities were noted 
as 150 FM sets distributed to Hawaii — 
although Hawaii has no FM station. 
As a result of the session, broadcasters 
will report future shortages in their 
respective areas to manufacturers. 
When shortages exist, broadcasters will 
forward this information to NARTB; 
it will then be given to the RTMA; 
which, in turn, will transmit the data 
weekly to manufacturers involved. FM 
broadcasters were extremely pleased 
with this meeting of minds, one com- 
menting to SPONSOR: "At last, the set- 
tling of FM's circulation problems is 
out of the hot-air stage." In another 
big development, radio and TV set 
manufacturers are conducting a $100,- 
000 study to check movement of sets 
from the retailer to the home. 



Q. What's the outlook for FM 
"functional music?" 

A. Very grim. "Functional music," 
with its "beeping out" or obliteration 
of commercials, has been a mainstay 
of a handful of FM stations, along 
with Transit Radio and Storecasting 
(covered elsewhere in this issue). 
When the FCC last May ordered FM 
stations to discontinue "functional mu- 
sic" broadcasting. 13 of them filed a 
hotly phrased petition urging the Com- 
mission to reconsider its decision. The 
stations protested they were already 
caught between AM and TV. 

Moreover, WWDC-FM. Washington, 
filed a separate blast against the FCC's 
fiat. It claimed that the Commission 
was "impelled by the cramped, tor- 
tured and myopic views of the law and 
the Commissions function thereunder 
that the monopolistic competitors of 
■functional music propound. Phis 
last crack seemed like a direct refer- 
ence to Mu/ak Corporation, which al- 
legedly initiated the FCC's ban on 
"functional music." If the FCC does 
not reverse its decision, it is certain 
that FM'ers will carry their fight for 
survival to the Supreme Court. 



Transit Radio 



Q. What's the fall outlook for 
transit radio (FM radio programing 
and advertising directed to bus 
and trolley riders)? 

A. Business as usual pending a high 
court decision on its legality. Transit 
Radio Company, with headquarters in 
the Union Trust Building, Cincinnati, 
unsuccessfully petitioned the U.S. Court 
of Appeals, asking it to reconsider its 
earlier decision that Transit Radio 
commercials are "unconstitutional, be- 
cause they destroy "freedom of atten- 
tion." Meanwhile. Frank Pellegrin, 
sales manager of H-R Representatives, 
which handles Transit Radio sales, told 
sponsor: "We are determined to win 
in this fight for Transit Radio's life. 
The Court of Appeals having turned 
down our petition, we'll take it to the 
Supreme Court this fall." 



Q. What's the current status of 
Transit Radio's sponsors? 

A. Business is still flowing into Tran- 
sit Radio; selling continues. Only one 
advertiser, Miles Laboratories for Ner- 
vine, cancelled, under the impression 
that continued use might be construed 
as contempt of court. But after Tran- 
.-it Radio explained the legal situation, 
the account was reinstated. Transit 
Radio now has more than 100 spon- 
sors using its services in 13 cities, 
among them Continental Baking, 
Brown & Williamson Tobacco. Fanny 
Farmer Candy. Whitehall Pharmacal. 
Stag Beer, Bell Telephone. 

Q. What does Transit Radio cost? 

A. The rate is based on this rule-of- 
thumb formula: $1.00 per 1.000 cus- 
tomers. The many success stories 
Transit Radio boasts can be summed 
up in this typical report by David G. 
Taft. manager. WCTS-FM. Cincinnati: 
"Miss Giese, the local manager of 
Fanny Farmer candies, informed us 
that sales in the Cincinnati stores were 
averaging between 6 ft and 1'A below 
last year prior to the Transit Radio 



IS YOUR SLIP 
SHOWING? 

see puffo I Hit 



SPONSOR 



What's up at CT3gLLi S> 

Everything! (except rates-) 

LISTENERSHIP — Highest ratings* in the station's history, 
day and night (TV notwithstanding). 




RETURNS — 14 different sponsors using WCFL exclusively re- 
port steadily increasing effectiveness. Other adver- 
tisers are defying the "summer slump" and staying 
on as never before. 

A loan company says, "We're doubling our 
time purchases, and we're using ONLY 
WCFL!" 

A used car dealer says, "Our advertising is 
keyed to direct results — and we're buying a 
second (additional) 15-minute strip over 
WCFL." 

A TV dealer adds a second strip across the 
board. 

BUSINESS — More local and more national advertisers are 
now represented on WCFL than ever before. 

An audience estimated at well over ONE MILLION heard a recent White 



Sox night game against the St. Louis Browns ! 

WCFL 



An ABC Affiliate 



Represented by the Boiling Company, Inc. 



50,000 WATTS-1000 ON YOUR DIAL 
666 LAKE SHORE DRIVE, CHICAGO, ILL. 



16 JULY 1951 



97 




Presenting the handsome Hollywood 
singing personality, Allan Jones, plus 
England's 60-voice Luton Girls Choir and 
40-piece concert orchestra directed by 
Sidney Torch — 30 minutes, every week 
for 52 weeks. 




i„-i ll£ r Z nn o\ 






The name "Allan Jones" conjures up numerous 

moments from Hollywood's silver screen: 

remember "A Night at the Opera". . ."The Boys 

from Syracuse". . ."The Firefly". . ."The Great Victor 

Herbert"? They were all starring vehicles for 

Allan Jones. 

Star-studded entertainment— a brilliant 30-minute 
musical presentation of show tunes, standards and 
outstanding novelties — complete with voice tracks 
by Allan Jones opening and closing the show and 
introducing many of the featured numbers. 

"The Allan Jones Show" is big-time! The listener 
appeal is universal. Available in September over 
all Lang-Worth affiliated stations — 30 minutes, 
every week for 52 weeks. Send for your illus- 
trated brochure now. 

LAM-WORTH 

FEATURE PROGRAMS. Inc. 



Ml 

^ eX 






tcf 1 



auo^o 






■anew'' 



SidHty 



tot^ 



113 WEST 57th STREET, NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

WESTERN OFFICE 

LANG-WORTH Feature Prog. Inc. 
14579 Benefit St., Sherman Oaks, Cal. 

CANADIAN OFFICE 

^ S. W. CALDWELL ltd. 

80 Richmond Street West, Toronto 




£:?»'.*. 



"'^"y* °n d -." *r, s 




A * to »< -Cut 



""&. 



'"*<& 



0/r 



You 



Can't 



Sell 



Durham 

Without 
Station 

WDNC 



DURHAM, 
North Carolina 

5,000 WATTS 

620 K.c. 

PAUL H. RAYMER, REP. 




campaign. After 12 weeks of Transit 
Radio, the sales in these stores are now 
averaging T/c above last year." 



Q. Is there any change pending in 
Transit Radio programing? 

A. No. The basic ingredient will still 
continue to be listenable popular tunes. 
Other elements are capsuled news, with 
accent on local items; time signals; 
weather reports; sports scores. Com- 
mercials are spotted at least five min- 
utes apart. Although newspapers like 
the St. Louis Post Dispatch and Wash- 
ington Post have blasted away at Tran- 
sit Radio commercials, contending 
they capitalize on a "captured audi- 
ence," a survey that Public Transit 
Companies made in eight cities showed 
over 95% passenger approval. 



Storecasting 



Q. Just what is Storecasting? 

A. Storecasting is an exclusive service 
offered by Storecast Corporation of 
America ( 100 Fifth Avenue, New York 
11, N. Y.I which offers manufacturers 
a valuable coordinating tool in their 
merchandising. FM radio is used to 
funnel programs consisting of music, 
homemaking talks, and commercials 
into 630 super markets, giving spon- 
sors (more than 250 grocery and drug 
sundry manufacturers ) an opportunity 
to hit potential customers at the point 
of sale. Of equal importance to the 
sponsor is the fact that more than 400 
personal service calls are made to suh- 
scribing stores every week. These calls 
are made by merchandising experts 
who encourage retailers to maintain 
adequate stock levels and display spon- 
sored products in prominent positions 
on the shelves. These frequent con- 
tacts assure the retailer of receiving 
the best results of promotions such as 
"Breakfast Banquet" and "Royal Fam- 
ily." Newspaper ads and colorful pos- 
ters at point of sale are used to supple- 
ment the broadcasts and focus atten- 
tion on the products featured in the 
promotion. 



Q. Are sponsors satisfied with 
Storecasting results? 

A. Storecasting, now in its sixth year, 
has a renewal rate of better than 70%. 
Sponsors such as Ceneral Foods, Swift 



& Company, Libby, McNeill & Libby 
have been using this medium since its 
inception. Since the first of the year, 
77 new advertisers have signed up in- 
cluding Jell-0 ; Kraft ; Beech-Nut Baby 
Foods; Yes Tissues; Hormel Chili Con 
Carne; Minute Maid Lemonade Mix. 
Yal S. Bauman, sales manager of Na- 
tional Tea Company, says, "We know 
that our Storecast advertising pro- 
duces an increase in product sales of 
from 25% to 150%." 



Q. What new developments are 
anticipated in Storecasting? 

A. Recently, drug and drug sundry 
manufacturers have begun to aggres- 
sively merchandise and promote the 
sales of their products in super mar- 
kets. The problem of coordination 
here promises to be a terrific one and 
Storecast has been counselling both 
manufacturers and retailers as to the 
development of basic formulas for 
merchandising the line. A number of 
drug producers have signed up for the 
Storecasting service, and it is expected 
that drugs and drug sundries will add 
a substantial sum to the annual super 
market "take." 



Role of reps 



Q. What do the station reps do 
besides selling time? 

A. Reps are more important in the 
structure of spot radio than ever be- 
fore. From "pavement pounders" they 
have evolved into consultants for their 
stations on every phase of operation. 
Edward Petry, for example, exercised 
leadership by making a study of spot 
radio effectiveness in St. Louis. The 
Katz Agency goes in heavily for re- 
search (both AM and TV), supplies 
stations and timebuyers with valuable, 
data. John Blair has taken an active 
role in suggesting programing improve- 
ments to its stations. Free & Peters 
makes an important informational con- 
tribution with its shirt-sleeve clinics. 
Forjoe has organized a group of Negro 
stations into a coalition. 

All of the reps are increasingly ac- 
tive in recommending improvements, 
setting of rate structure, in fact, any 
aspect of station policy. The stations 
have turned to them for guidance be- 
cause they are faced now with greater 
difficulty in selling time than was usual 



100 



SPONSOR 



*-». /V"< >'? |.i? ** r s IV-'- ,....-. ^-\- 




. ... .... . . *iVO» Ar*-^- ^'>^\ 



V \ 



















/•ay y - v -V* - (^ s **• 






America's 
Greatest 

rtft'»'i "[[cm Advertising 

f 'fl\\ MIRf 

Medium 



KL4 



16 JULY 1951 



101 



in pre-war, pre-TV days. Advertisers 
benefit, in the long run. from the new 
role of the reps because what they are 
doing serves to make spot radio an in- 
creasingly effective medium. 



Foreign-language 



market 



Q. How can this market be reached 
with a minimum of waste? 

A. Foreign-language groups tend to 



congregate in the metropolitan areas, 
making it easy for the advertiser to 
pin-point his message. New York, New 
Jersey and Connecticut, with a total 
population of slightly less than 19 and 
a half million, have 1.800.000 Italian- 
speaking people; 2,200,000 Yiddish; 
over 500,000 Polish; 700,000 German; 
400,000 Spanish. In the Southwest 
area of the U. S., between 3,000.000 
and 3,500,000 Spanish-speaking folks 
I mostly Mexicans) are located. 

The Foreign Language Quality Net- 
work has collected data showing over 
four million Italian-speaking people in 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S PiQ*t£eA> RADIO STATION 




*C. E. HOOPER, Inc. 
Get the entire story from FREE & PETERS 




14 markets and more than 1,500,000 
Polish listeners in 11 market areas. 
Surprisingly, few advertisers have 
taken advantage of the availability of 
this valuable data assembled by FLQN. 
according to Ralph Weil. President of 
the organization. 



Q. What about the Italian-speak- 
ing market? 

A. A recent Pulse survey for WO\ . 
New York, revealed that in WOV's 
area this market includes 515.001 ) 
radio-homes. The average family con- 
sists of 4.11 persons as against a city- 
wide average of 3.30 persons. Two- 
thirds of the Italian-market house- 
wives are foreign-born (justifying 
heavy daytime programing I . Within 
this group, the station has a 17'. 
greater tune-in than competitive Eng- 
lish-language stations. Proof of the 
pulling power of this type of program- 
ing was demonstrated to the Uddo- 
Taromina Company, manufacturers of 
Progresso Foods. This sponsor booked 
a quarter-hour musical show ( six days 
weekly I and offered to broadcast a 
recording of a message from any speci- 
fied relative in Italy in return for a 
$2.00 proof of sale. Within two weeks 
he was so swamped that he upped the 
ante to a $12.00 proof of sale. In the 
past eight months so many people 
snapped up this offer that the sponsor 
has had to double his airtime in order 
to broadcast playbacks of the messages 
from Italy. 

An Advertest study made for 
WHOM, New York, showed the aver- 
age sets-in-use figures during Italian 
program periods never fell below 259c 
for any 15-minute period, even during 
the early morning, and reached as high 
as 60% sets-in-use during the evening 
periods. This Italian-speaking mar- 
ket, says Advertest, ranks as the sixth 
largest market in the U. S. 

Q. How can a sponsor cash in on 
the Yiddish market. 

A. During the week stations WEVD 
and WLIB beam at 2.200,000 people 
in New York with a wide variety of 
programing. WLIB is currently broad- 
casting 12 hours of Yiddish programs 
and 24 hours of Anglo-Jewish mate- 
rial every week for sponsors as diversi- 
fied as Safeway Stores. Crawford 
Clothes. Procter & Gamble, and Hotel 
Diplomat. WMGM, New York, gar- 
ners a fat slice of this market with its 



102 



SPONSOR 




LEADS ALL OTHER INDEPENDENT STATIONS 



43 



OUT OF 



58 



QUARTER HOURS* 



Detroit Conlan Report — April 15 Through 21, 1951 



attd,,, IN THE AFTERNOON .. . (12:00 N-6:00 P.M. 





IS 



THE NUMBER THREE STATION 



IN DETROIT 



SHARE OF AUDIENCE 



Network "A" 24.1 

Network "B" 20.9 

WKMH 13.6 

Network "C" 13.3 

Network "D" 1 1 .9 

Independent 9.8 

Non-Rated Independ- 
ents (And other).... 6.4 



BETTER BUY 



WKMH 




IN DETROIT 



"American-Jewish Caravan of Stars" 
every Sunday from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. 
Broadcast in English, the program fea- 
tures top stars of the American-Jewish 
entertainment world such as Henny 
Youngman, Molly Picon, Moishe Oy- 
sher, and Harry Hershfield. Present 
sponsors of the program are White 
Rock Sparkling Beverages, Barricini 
Candy, and I. Rokeach Food Products. 



Q. Although the Negro market is 
a large one, isn't it a low-income 
one? 



A. A recent Daniel Starch survey for 
Ebony magazine revealed that the 15,- 
000,000 Negroes in this country con- 
stitute a $15 billion market. Radio is 
being recognized as the medium that 
reaches areas not touched by Negro 
slick magazines. This, coupled with a 
growing awareness of the hefty income 
of the Negro market, is drawing ad- 
vertisers to the Negro market. 

Preferred Negro Markets, Inc., a 
new combination of Negro program 
stations represented by Forjoe & Co., 
New York, reports a remarkable inter- 
est by national advertisers. 




Think this over ! 
When you use WIBW, 
our listeners have con- 
fidence in YOU, too! 



Last year, WIBW listeners sent us 
almost a quarter-million dollars* in 
cold, hard cash. 

This money came direct to WIBW 
because our listeners have absolute 
confidence in the merchandise we 
talk about on the air. 

When our listeners hear any product 
advertised on WIBW, that's all the 
recommendation they need. They 
buy. 



'■$204,800.93 to be exact. 



fr 



v^_ 



WIBW 



Serving and Selling 

THE MAGIC CIRCLE 

Rep.': Copper Publications, Inc. • BEN tUDY, Gen. Mgr. • WIBW • KCKN 




Throughout the nation, and espe- 
cially in the South, radio stations have 
emerged for the prime purpose of cap- 
turing this rich market. Many of these 
stations use sub-standard programing 
and literally insult their listeners with 
cut-rate quality discs, too much em- 
phasis on blues numbers, and "talking 
down" to the audience. Joseph L. 
Wooton of Interstate United Newspa- 
pers, Inc. (radio division) has hopes 
of getting together with top-notch Ne- 
gro programers and setting up a code 
designed to raise the level of program 
content on these stations. 

As in the case of other minority 
groups, the Negro has a strong sense 
of brand loyalty. Because he has al- 
ways felt discriminated against, the 
very fact that a station removes some 
of that feeling by "talking" directly to 
him is almost enough to guarantee that 
he will spend his money on the prod- 
ucts and services advertised on that 
station. 



Q. What radio advertising possi- 
bilities exist outside of the conti- 
nental U. S.? 

A. Here's some data on good markets: 
American representatives for sta- 
tions in the 15,000,000-population Ca- 
nadian market (Weed & Company, 
Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc., Donald 
Cooke, and Joseph Hershey McGillvra) 
say that an increasing number of 
American advertisers are waking up to 
the vast sales potential and good brand 
of radio available in Canada, (spon- 
sor's second issue in August will con- 
tain a special section dedicated to Ca- 
nadian broadcast advertising.) 

Puerto Ricans spend about $340-, 
000.000 for mainland products annual- 
ly, and personal income levels are in- 
creasing. Although there's only about 
150,000 radio sets on the island, au- 
thorities seem to be under the impres- 
sion that about three families listen to 
each set. Almost all programing is in 
Spanish. 

Hawaii has more than 100.000 radio 
homes. The 466,000 islands racked 
up an income of more than $480 mil- 
lion last year. Almost 58.000 tourists 
dropped $35 million in this year-round 
vacationland. Bulk of programing is 
in English, remainder in Japanese and 
Ilocano. All of the top networks have 
local outlets and national advertisers 
have gobbled up main time slots. The 
CBS outlet in Honolulu. KCMB. car- 
ries everything from "Arthur Godfrey 



104 



SPONSOR 



and His Friends" and '"Strike It Rich" 
to "Perry Mason" and "Brighter Day." 
The 10 radio stations in Alaska can 
thank Uncle Sam for the recently in- 
creased defense appropriations which 
have sent a host of free-spending con- 
struction workers up to "Seward's fol- 
ly." Many sponsors, such as Blatz 
Beer, Philip Morris, Kolynos, and Bi- 
CoDol, are spending money to get their 
share of the market. Programing 
ranges from disk jockeys and soap 
operas to news programs and live ma- 
jor league baseball games. 



Regional nets 



Q. What are the advantages of 
regional network sponsorship? 

A. The national advertiser can select 
big sections where his product sales 
are weak; where he wants to increase 
distribution. Regional nets offer him 
a selectivity not available with net 
sponsorship, a range not available gen- 
erally via a single station. Anthony C. 
DePierro, Geyer, Newell & Granger 
vice president, cites this example of 
radio's regional situation today: "An 
advertiser with distribution in approxi- 
mately 20 states long wanted regional 
net radio but never seemed to be able 
to swing prime time periods. Present 
conditions in the radio field have 
changed this. Now he can get what 
he wants with plenty of station cooper- 
ation." 



Q. What's the fall outlook for re- 
gional network sponsorship? 

A. A spokesman for the huge Don Lee 
network, which has 45 stations along 
the Pacific Coast, told SPONSOR :"Our 
business will be at an all-time high 
this fall." Among its many current na- 
tional and regional advertisers are Bor- 
den, Dolcin, Viking Soap (Los An- 
geles), Hubinger Starch Company, 
Studebaker, and Wildroot. 

The only cloud on the horizon, ac- 
cording to Wythe Walker of The Wal- 
ker Company: "The networks are 
cutting rates and undervaluing the me- 
dium." The Walker Company repre- 
sents Pacific Northwest Broadcasters; 
Z-Bar Network { Montana) ; and Okla- 
homa Group Broadcasters. 

A Paul H. Raymer Company spokes- 
man says the regional networks they 
represent show business increases over 



a like period last year. The McClatchy 
Beeline stations in California are sub- 
stantially ahead of last year's business 
including the summer months; the Ari- 
zona Broadcasting System and the New 
England Major Market group report 
similar billing increases. 

Good business for three regional net 
accounts (Lone Star Chain: Oklahoma 
Network and the Southwest Network I 
are reported by the O. L. Taylor Com- 
pany. The same holds true for the 
Intermountain network represented by 
Avery-Knodel. The outlook for the 
New England regional net, according 



to Weed & Company is most favorable 
from an AM point of view. 

At the same time that regional busi- 
ness is on the upswing, the newest re- 
gional system announces the affiliation 
of a 27th station to its group. The Fi- 
delity Broadcasting System Inc., a 
group of hometown stations in Florida 
which began operation last February, 
is programing 18 hours a day. The net 
reports many national and regional 
advertisers. The programing fare: 
sports, locally produced shows, and 
transcribed programs from the major 
transcription firms. 




18 of the 20 top-rated 
programs are on CBS 
• . • and in Buffalo 
CBS is WGR 





^rtntdcoAtmy Grrpj^rutwti 



RAND BUILDING, BUFFALO 3, N. Y. 
National Representatives: Free & Peters, Inc. 



leo 1. ("Fitz") Fitzpalrick 
I. R. ("Ike") touniberry 



16 JULY 1951 



105 




is a BETTER THAN EVER BUY! 




WOAI has almost 5 times the NIGHTTIME coverage of any other San 
Antonio station (BMB). 




WOAI has almost 2 1 2 times the DAYTIME coverage of any other San 
Antonio station <BMB). 



DOMINANT BY NIGHT 



and DAY 



WOAI leads in Hooper ratings morning, afternoon and night. (Hooper's 
continuing study; San Antonio Metropolitan Area). 

DELIVERS MORE AUDIENCE 



WOAI, since 1942, has increased its radio family audience 108°o 
after erroneously eliminating all TV families in area as per ANA. 

FOR LESS MONEY! 

WOAI has increased its basic hour rates only 
13% since 1942. Radio families have increased 
84%. On this basis WOAI might logically increase 
its rate from $340 to $624 an hour. 

Still the MOST POWERFUL advertising 
influence in THE SOUTHWEST! 



this 



San Antonio 

rj5tM A AMIKKAS fAilliJ 



f'ti 



7 major arr 



Represented Nationally by 
EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY, INC. 
New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, St. Louis 
Dallas, San Francisco, Detroit 




Bj ffliiHliK5j 



106 



SPONSOR 



RADIO 

BASICS 



Radio Basics, you'll quickly discover is something special. 

Packed into easily-read, attractive charts and tables is what 
we believe to be the most extensive compendium of basic in- 
formation about radio ever put together in one place. 

A careful and extensive survey of the entire research field 
brought to light a variety of valuable information. Here are 
facts that even industry experts forget in the press of every- 
day operation. Some of the sources from which sponsor 
made its selection: A. C. Nielsen Co., The Biow Co., Pulse. 
BBDO Television Survey, Trendex, C. E. Hooper, CBS, NBC 
research, Audit Bureau of Circulations, PIB. 

In detailing the broad scope of radio's coverage, compara- 
ble figures are given for other principal media. The same 
goes for costs. Just how much does radio cost to reach a 
given number of listeners; which types of programs do the 
most efficient job; and how does the spoken medium compare 
with printed media and TV? These are only a few of the 
questions answered. 

Radio Basics is more than a primer of elementary lore, it 
brings up-to-date many changing factors — number of radio 
sets sold last year, car-radio population, radio and TV homes. 
An index at the right tells where to locate each subject. 



I Audience dimensions 108 



II Cost of radio 



III Kadio's hillings 



I Hi 



120 



IV Time listeners spend 

with radio 122 

V Where listening lakes 

place in home 121 

VI Itadio listening in TV 

homes 1 20 



► ►► 



/ The dimensions of rad£o 9 s audience 

1. How many U.S. homes have radio? 



Source: Radio & Television Research Section, The Biow Co., 1951 








96^7 have radios 



4% have no radios 



How Radio compares with TV 

Radio's 96% saturation compares with 
a national TV saturation of 26%. Physi- 
cally, 37% of America's homes are 
presently outside television's coverage 
area; all of the country, with negligi- 
ble exceptions, is reached by radio. 



2. How many sets are there per home? 



Source: NBC Research- — I January 1951 




One radio set 
22,054,000 homes or 53'7 





Two radio sets 
13,232,400 homes or 47' 



9 9 



0> 9 




Three radio sets 

4,410,800 homes 

or lO^c 




. i» o 



Four radio sets 
2,205,400 homes 

or 5 f 7 



Altogether, this adds up to 71,900,000 home radio sets now in use. During 1949 about 10,000,000 new radios were sold; during 1950 
14,000,000 were sold. Source: O. H. Caldwell, edilor of "Tele-Tech" magazine. 



3. How many homes listen to the average program? 



Source: A. C. Nielsen 






Evening average 

Average evening net- 
work show draws an 
audience of 3,3 10,000 
homes. 




,VIV 



Day average (cumulative) 

Average five-times-a-week daytime radio 
show during Dec. -Jan. 1951 reached 10,601,- 
000 homes. 



Evening average (cumulative) 

Average one-night-a-week network radio 
show during Dec. -Jan. 1951 reached 9,931,- 
000 homes one or more times over four-week 
period. 



108 



SPONSOR 



4. How does radio's circulation compare with other media? 

Sources: Audit Bureau of Circulations, NBC Research* 

Medium Circulation % of U.S. 

Radio (estimated Oct.-Dec, 1951) _... 42,900,000 96% 

TV (estimated Oct.-Dec, 1951) 15,000,000 33% 

Radio-Only Homes (estimated Oct.-Dec. 1951) 27,900,000 63% 

Saturday Evening Post' 4,036,246 9% 

Life* 5,351,630 12% 

This Week* ......._. 10,006,564 22% 

*Most recent ABC reports. Life & Saturday Evening Post, 9 months ending 30 September 1950. This Week, 6 months ending 30 September 1950. 



5. How does radio compare with other media in delivered audience? 

Sources: Various, see below 



Radio (Vz hr. once a week average evening program; Oct.-Dec. 1951) 8,190,000 people 

TV (Vz hr. once a week average evening program; Oct.-Dec. 1951) __. 6,003,000 people 

Saturday Evening Post (1949 to 1950) _ 4,415,000 people 

Life (continuing Politz Study) 5,509,000 people 

This Week (July 1949-June 1950) 7,149,000 people 

SOURCES FOR FIGURES ABOVE 

RADIO: 1950. Gross audience 16,982.000 multiplied by 

Average */, hour Nielsen rating 8.3; average average percent of noting, 26%, gives 4,415,000 

homes reached on basis of 41,700,000 radio readers. Pages were black & white, 

homes — 3,561,000. Multiplied by 2.3 listeners 
per home to give 8,190,000 people. 

LIFE: 

Sources — Politz Study. Noting data from Daniel 
■"•' Starch Consumer Magazine Report Julv 1949 to 

Average V2 hour evening ARB rating 18.6, ad- June 1950. Gross audience 23,950,000 multiplied 

justed to projectable rating of 13.8. Average by average percent of noting. 23%, gives 5,509,- 

homes reached on basis of 15,000,000 TV fami- 000 readers. Pages black & white, 

lies — 2,070,000. Multiplied by listeners per home 
to give 6,003,000. 

THIS WEEK: 

Sources — Daniel Starch Consumer Magazine Re- 
SATEVEPOST: por , j u ] v 1949 to j une 1950. Noting data, same. 

Source*. — Continuing Study of Magazine Audi- Gross audience 23.829.000 multiplied by average 

ences, 1949. Noting data from Daniel Starch percent of noting (black & white page), 30%, 

Consumer Magazine Report July 1949 to June gives 7,149.000 reader-. 

16 JULY 1951 109 



► 



i 



RATINGS 



■«■ 



I 



RENEWALS 



•-ISs&^i'Sft !■.<■■ 



• . 






^ 



HIGHER RATINGS 



In BIG Towns 


In SMALL Towns 


San Francisco . 16.0 


Hattiesburg . . 29.6 


Louisville . . 21.7 


Zanesville . . 26.0 


Minneapolis . 16.5 


Youngstown . . 21.3 



He'll chalk up high ratings for you, too.' 

MORE RENEWALS! 

. . . Minneapolis, consistently outrating important 

network shows. 
. . . New Orleans, consistently delivering a large and 

loyal audience. 
. . . Raleigh, consistently selling for Carolina Power 

and Light Company. 

He'll chalk up more renewals for you, loo! 

EASIER SALES 

• "Boston Blackie' s 19.1, the highest rated show on Sunday afternoon in 

Kansas City." 

James Coy — Rogers & Smith Advertising Agency 

• "Boston Blackie has the most loyal listening audience of any show we've 

ever had on the air and is Lake Charles most outstanding mystery 
show " 

James H. Jesse, Pgm. Dir., Station KLOU, Lake Charles, La. 

• "Today marks the 91st broadcast of Boston Blackie for Falls City Beer — 

Louisville. Our latest Hooper tops all network and local competitive 

programs." . , 

Ray D. Williams — Prater Advertising Agency 

• "We ore having tremendous success with Boston Blackie. Once it was 

necessary to re-schedule ^Blackie' for play-by-play sport commitments. 
It would be difficult for you to appreciate the deluge of calls we 
received at the station." 

John T. Rutledge, Ass't. Gen. Mgr., Station WVJS, Owensboro, Ky. 

He'll chalk up easier sales for you, too! 



■> 



Mov^onTl/f 

AM + TV = TOP RESULTS! 

Boston Blackie on TV is already proving the fastest seller ever. 
Sponsored by big-name advertisers on top TV stations in: 

NEW YORK CITY, CHICAGO, LOS ANGELES, WASHINGTON, D. C, 
DETROIT, CINCINNATI, DAYTON, COLUMBUS, PITTSBURGH, CLEVELAND, 
LANCASTER, TOLEDO, MINNEAPOLIS, RICHMOND, NORFOLK, ATLANTA 

HURRY YOUR MARKET MAY STILL BE AVAILABLE! 

WRITE, WIRE OR PHONE. 



I* 



fttitf 



®mr 



'»£"*» tat 6 ,. 



***to 



"°"nv c 



6. What's the size of the out-of-home audience? 

Source: Pulse "Out-of-Home" listening survey, February 1951 




City 

Philadelphia 

Boston 

New York 

Cincinnati 

St. Louis 

Minn. -St. Paul 

Chicago 



Average quarter-hour sets-in- 

use of "in-home" radio 

listening 



19.8 
23.1 
24.1 
20.5 
21.9 
25.0 
20.8 



3 



? 



Werage quarter-hour sets-in- 

use of "out-of-home" radio 

listening 


Percent of additional listening 

added by "out-of-home" 

sets 


3.4 




17.2% 


3.4 




14.7% 


3.5 




14.5% 


2.7 




13.2% 


2.4 




11.0% 


2.7 




10.8% 


2.2 




10.6% 



Listening from 6 a.m. to midnight every day of the week; by average quarter-hour sets-in-use. 



7. How many car radios are there? 



Source: The Pulse, Inc., 1951 

Metropolitan Area 

Atlanta 

Birmingham 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Detroit 

Los Angeles 



Car Radios 

71,100 

66,700 
288,200 
138,400 
716,700 
130,900 
501,900 
857,900 




Metropolitan Area 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 

New Orleans 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Richmond 

St. Louis 

San Francisco _ 

Washington, D. C. 



Auto radios installed, U. S. — .. 

Percentage of cars equipped with radio 
Radios in public places 



19,100,000 

46.9% 

5,000,000 

Source of figures immediately above: NBC Research, January 1951 



Car Radios 

171,800 
81,300 
770,000 
301,600 
43,600 
234,800 
350,100 
151,200 



8. How long do they listen daily out-of-home? 

Source: BBDO report on TV, 1951* 

Non-TV Homes TV Homes 

AVERACE LISTENER 1 hr. 23 min. 1 hr. 20 min. 

HOUSEWIFE 1 hr. 10 min. 1 hr. 03 min. 

MALE HEAD OF FAMILY 1 hr. 26 min. 1 hr. 22 min. 

"OTHER" MEMBER 1 hr. 29 min. 1 hr. 32 min. 

^Note: Away from home listening was largely automobile radio listening. The BBDO panel showed 51% of its members auto-radio equipped. 

112 SPONSOR 



9. How does listening differ hour by hour? (by number of homes) 



Source: A. C, Nielsen, January 1951 










Time of Day Sets-in-Use 


Time of Day Sets-in-Use 


Ti 


me c 


f Day Sets-in-Use 


p*- J 9 AM-10 AM 6,709,000 


( ^i 2 PM-3 PM 8,121,000 


0' 


PM- 


8 PM 11,538,000 


r^ J 10 AM-11 AM 7,682,000 


C ^ 3 PM-4 PM 7,995,000 


©• 


PM- 


9 PM 11,820,000 


f \ J 11 AM-12 AM 8,058,000 


( y\ 4 PM-5 PM 7,838,000 


©• 


PM- 


10 PM 11,726,000 


( ' J 12 AM- 1 PM 9,030,000 


( k ) 5 PM " 6 PM 8 ' 215 ' 000 


©•• 


PM- 


11 PM 9,469,000 


f P\ 1 PM- 2 PM 9,657,000 


[ ] 6 PM-7 PM 9,594,000 


©" 


PM- 


12 PM 5,299,000 


10. How does listening differ hour by hour? (by °/o of homes) 


Source: A. C. Nielsen 










% Tuning in % Tuning in 
Homes with Radio Only Homes with Radio pi 


us TV 






All Homes* 


9-10 AM 
10-11 AM 
11-12 NOON 


21.4 16.6 

24.5 22.5 
25.7 25.7 








20.6 
24.0 
25.7 


12- 1 PM 

1- 2 PM 

2- 3 PM 


28.8 24.1 

30.8 18.4 

25.9 16.0 








27.4 
27.7 
23.6 


3- 4 PM 

4- 5 PM 

5- 6 PM 


25.5 16.3 
25.0 14.3 
26.2 13.6 








23.3 
22.3 
22.8 


6- 7 PM 

7- 8 PM 

8- 9 PM 


30.6 11.4 
36.8 10.9 

37.7 8.6 








25.7 
30.6 
31.0 


9-10 PM 
10-11 PM 
11-12 MID. 


37.4 8.5 
30.2 7.5 
16.9 5.4 








30.6 
24.3 
13.8 


*Except homes having no radio. 










11. How many homes are 


reached by the top 10 radio shows? 







Source: A. C. Nielsen. Total number of homes reached, average of second and third weeks of May, 1951 — Average Audience Basis 



16 JULY 1951 



1. Lux Radio Theater 

2. Jack Benny 

3. Charlie McCarthy 

4. My Friend Irma 

5. Talent Scouts 

6. Walter Winchell 

7. Mystery Theater 

8. You Bet Your Life 

9. Mr. Keen 

10. Mr. Chameleon 



No. of homes 

4,274,000 
3,855,000 
3,771,000 
3,771,000 
3,646,000 
3,520,000 
3,436,000 
3,394,000 
3,394,000 
3,143,000 



113 



► 



12. How many listeners per set? 



Source: C. E. Hoooer, Mid-winter 1949-50 









N. Y. Time 


Radio Audience 


TV Audience 




■» fi 


Alt 


r3 


6:00- 7:00 p.m. 


0.71 


0.83 




nn 


Hi 


It 


7:00- 8:00 p.m. 


0.77 


1.07 




5 ff 


f 


I 


8:00- 9:00 p.m. 
9:00-10:00 p.m. 


0.76 
0.78 


1.21 
0.78 




^ 2 





£ 


6:00- 7:00 p.m. 


1.02 


0.94 




■ m A 


M 


■ 


7:00- 8:00 p.m. 


1.06 


1.17 




V W 


■ 


■ 










• A V 


V 


■ 


8:00- 9:00 p.m. 


1.07 


1.43 




z w flf 


W 


If 










v v rv 


l/v 


If 


9:00-10:00 p.m. 


1.12 


1.12 










6:00- 7:00 p.m. 


0.54 


1.46 




2 *>A 


£*- 


s 


7:00- 8:00 p.m. 


0.54 


1.17 




s A* 


•Jl 


m- 










i WW 


f 


f 


8:00- 9:00 p.m. 
9:00-10:00 p.m. 


0.49 
0.41 


0.87 

0.41 










6:00- 7:00 p.m. 


2.27 


3.23 




TOTAL 






7:00- 8:00 p.m. 
8:00- 9:00 p.m. 
9:00-10:00 p.m. 


2.37 
2.32 
2.31 


3.41 
3.51 
2.31 





13. How does listening vary with the season? 



Source: A. C. Nielsen 



Sets-in-use 

/in 




■■" 


Night 


ime 6 


p.m.- 


12 mi< 


i. 




Dayt 


me 6 


a.m.-( 


■> p.m. 




























4U 


















































„ 


M 






*N 


s 


r^ 










,' 


S 


*+ 


++* 


'«*>• 


*•». 


s 
















p-l 




ou 










^ 


^ 


\ 


■fffl 


/ 


/ 














S 


s 


V 


-- 


/ 


f 


4+* 


90. 








/u 


































^5 


*^ 










m _ 




















































III ■ 

n 
















































1 





JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN.JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN.JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC 
1 948 1 949 


■ 1 


114 










































SP 


ONS 


OR 







14. How many stations are there? 



Sources: Networks and TV Digest 



ABC 


CBS 


MBS 


\ NBC 


TOTAL 

WITH 

INDEPENDENTS 


RADIO 249 


180 


545 


168 


2,251 


TV 61 


62 


DUMONT 
60 


65 


107* 



*TV stations have multiple affiliations, particularly in one-station markets. , 
FM Stations— 672 , ;' '/ ' 



15. How does listening vary by city size? 



Source: A. C. Nielsen (Average audience by city size) 





Small & Rural 

1,223,000 listeners 

Total listeners — 3,227,000 



Medium-sized 

1,023,000 listeners 







Metropolitan 

981,000 listeners 



Number of programs averaged here — 105 




Seasonal variations in listening 

Chart, left, traces the seasonal pattern in radio listening. As adver- 
tisers have long been aware, January marks the peak of audience size, 
while July represents the trough. Summer dip of the listening curve 
has caused many sponsors to regard summer radio as a poor buy, 
audience-wise. But as one agency radio research expert pointed out 
to SPONSOR, if the averages of three months near peak and trough 
are compared, difference is not nearly as marked as it appears. Both 
high and low points are extremes which last only a short time, and 
consequently should not be regarded as significant in themselves. 



R. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. 

1951 



16 JULY 1951 



115 



II. Cost of broadcast advertising 

1. How many radio and how many TV homes can be reached for a dollar? 



Source: The Biow Co., Fall 1950 




Radio — 161 



Television — 87 



Homes per Dollar 



Persons per Dollar 

Radio — 
371 

Television — 
226 



2. How does network radio compare with other media in cost? 





Cost-per-thousand 


Audience 


Net Radio (a) 


2.23 


8,289,000 


Average sponsored evening half-hour 






Life (b) 


3.18 


5,509,000 


Average black-and-white page 






This Week (c) 


3.34 


7,149,000 


Average page 






Net TV (d) 


4.23 


5,889,000 


Average sponsored evening half-hour 







Sources: (a) Nielsen average audience rating Oct. -Dec. 1950; (b) Starch, July 1949-June 1950; gross audience Politz Study 1950; (c) Starch, 
July 1949-June 1950; (d) American Research Bureau, Oct.-Dec. 1950. 



3. What would be the cost of one announcement 
on enough stations to cover the U. S.? 

Source: The Biow Co. 




Evening- 
$3,500 



Day — 
$1,750 



116 



SPONSOR 



► 









C° ****** 






This powerful radio voice is hitting a 17,000,000 population area in 5 important states 
and is open to advertisers at the lowest rate of any major station in this region. A 
tremendous buy for action and sales that is establishing new records for advertisers 
daily. Plan your schedules NOW. Put this powerful 50,000 Watt voice to work for you. 

CKLW 

50,000 WATTS at 800 KC 
GUARDIAN BLDG. • DETROIT 

Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. J. E. Campeau 

9 
National Representative President 

Mutual Broadcasting System 

16 JULY 1951 . 117 



4. What's the talent cost, rating, and homes per dollar for various 
types of radio and TV programs? 



Sources: A. C. Nielsen, The Biov 



RADIO 



Program 
Type 


Average 

Talent 

Cost 


Number 
Programs 


Average 
Rating 


Number 
Programs 


Aver. No. 
Homes 
per $ 


Number 
Programs 


Average 

Talent 

Cost 


Number 
Programs 


Average 
Rating 


Situation 
Comedy 


$11,000 


8 


28.9 


8 


135 


8 


$10,700 


16 


9.6 


Variety 
Comedy 


$11,700 


19 


28.0 


19 


126 


19 


$19,500 


6 


10.2 


General 
Drama 


$ 7,500 


14 


26.7 


II 


116 


1 1 


$ 8,000 


5 


8.2 


Mystery 
Drama 


$13,500 


15 


28.0 


14 


145 


14 


$ 5,400 


20 


8.6 


Concert 
Music 


$15,800 


1 


20.1 


1 


82 


1 


$ 7,800 


6 


5.4 


Popular 
Music 


$ 9,800 


2 


36.8 


1 


73 


1 


$ 7,000 


5 


5.1 


Variety 
Music 


$ 6,500 


17 


19.6 


14 


94 


14 


$10,700 


6 


8.7 


Quiz & Aud. 
Partic. 


$11,600 


17 


22.1 


17 


127 


17 


$ 5,900 


10 


7.3 





Aver. No. 






Number 


Homes 


N 


umber 


Programs 


per $ 


P 


rograms 


16 


16 




181 


7 


142 




7 


5 


184 




5 


21 


211 




21 


8 


119 




8 


5 


123 




5 


6 


158 




6 


10 


188 




10 



5. What are some typical talent costs for radio shows? 
(compared with TV) 

Source: The Biow Co., January 195! estimates 

All shows are 30 minutes unless otherwise noted. 



RADIO 




TV 




RADIO 




TV 




Situation Comedy 








Quiz Panel 








Aldrich Family 


$10,000 


One Man's Family 


$8,500 


20 Questions 


$3,700 


Goodrich Celebrity Time $7,500 


Life of Riley 


$10,000 


The Goldbergs 
Stu Erwin 


$8,750 
$12,750 


Concert Music 




Leave it to the Years 


$3,750 


General Drama 








Voice of Firestone 


$8,000 


Voice of Firestone 


$13,500 


Dr. Christian 


$6,000 


Hollywood Screen Test 


$3,000 


Telephone Hour 


$13,200 






Hallmark Playhouse 


$6,000 


Kraft Theatre (60 min. 


) $13,600 


Railroad Hour 


$10,500 






Cavalcade of America 


$13,200 


Studio One (60 min.) 


$16,500 


Popular Music 








Mystery Drama 








Vaughn Monroe 


$10,000 


Your Hit Parade 


$28,000 


Nick Carter 


$2,300 


The Web 


$8,500 


Contented Hour 


$7,500 






Mystery Theatre 


$5,200 


Lights Out 


$8,500 










Mr. and Mrs. North 


$7,500 


Plainclothesman 


$3,750 


Variety Comedy 
















Red Skelton 


$20,100 


Allen Young 


$13,500 


Audience Participation 






Judy Canova 


$9,800 


Ken Murray (60 min.) 


$20,000 


People Are Funny 


$8,500 


Paul Winchell 


$12,800 


Jack Benny 


$28,800 


Colgate Comedy Hour 
(60 min.) 


$50,000 


Quiz Giveaway 








Variety Music 








$64 Question 


$4,00C 


Chance of a Lifetime 


$3,750 


Bing Crosby 


$25,000 


Godfrey's Talent Scouts 


$4,500 


Bob Hawk 


$7,500 


Stop the Music 


$8,750 


Grand 'ol Apry 


$5,200 


Showtime USA 


$21,000 






(30 min. segment] 




Gene Autry 


$7,500 


Original Amateur Hour 


$10,000 



118 



SPONSOR 



WEST VIRCINIA 
STATE CAPITOL, 
CHARLESTON 




This is the story of radio in 

Charleston* 

liVest I ii'fjitiiii... 

the whs story 

WCHS is the station with the highest over- 
all Hooperating! With five stations in town, WCHS has 43.1% 
of the total audience— more than twice the share of the next 
ranking station! This establishes WCHS as tops in the Charleston 
city area! 

WCHS runs away with the score in the 
hinterland as shown by the latest BMB figures! They show that 
the total picture discloses that WCHS gives you more than all 
the other four in terms of total listening audience! 

WCHS leads overwhelmingly in top rated 
shows! The Hooper survey shows that WCHS leads the field in 
84.1% of all rated quarter hours! 

WCHS advertisers have the lion's share of 
the audience both in and out of the city area — and your chances 
are 6 out of 7 that you will be in the highest rated spot in 
Charleston radio at the times you're on the air! 

The Charleston, W. Vo., Radio Story is the Story of 



WCHS • 580 ON YOUR DIAL • 5000 WATTS DAY AND NIGHT 



16 JULY 1951 



119 



I 



III. Radius Billings 

1. How much money, in gross figures, has been spent to buy network time in 
recent years? 



Source: Publishers Information Bureau 




1951 
First 5 Months 



$33,060,678 




$25,260,893 




$14,582,390 -12.0 



+ or - 
from 1950 



+ 9.9 '.; 



- 8.8 




$ 7,668,217 



5.2 



1950 



$70,744,669 



61,397,650 



35,124,624 



+ or -*, 
from 1949 



11.6' 



4.1 



17.1 



1949 



$63,403,583 



1948 



$62,265,105 



1947 



$59,250,964 



64,013,296 69,697,590 65,756,517 



42,342,854 44,304,245 43,550,144 



16,091,977 -10.8 



18,040,596 22,728,802 22,372,711 



TOTAL NETWORK GROSS TIME BILLING 




*9t9 / 

/Jssoi 



$183,400,000 




ISffj I $ 80,572,178 (first 5 months) 



2. How much money was spent to buy spot radio time? 

Source: SPONSOR estimate 




1947 
$90 million 



1948 
$100 million 



1949 
$108 million 



1950 
$120 million 



120 



1951 
$132 million 

SPONSOR 



► 



FOR 



COVERAGE 



WITH A 



+ 



II I : < . I O X A L I. Y 



WGY and only WGY with its powerful 50,000 watts serves 53 counties 
in 5 northeastern states. Included in this tremendous coverage picture are 21 
major metropolitan markets each with 25,000 or more people within its retail 
trading area. 



HOOPER SHOW 1. If IT . . . 


. BMB 


1' HOM.lt IT 




HERE THEY ARE 










NEW YORK 










ALBANY 


HUDSON 




NORWICH 


SARATOGA 


AMSTERDAM 


JOHNSTOWN 




ONEONTA 


SCHENECTADY 


GLENS FALLS 


KINGSTON 




ROME 


TROY 


GLOVERSVILLE 








UTICA 


MASSACHUSETTS 




VERMONT 




ADAMS 


PITTSFIELD 




BARRE 


RUTLAND 


NORTH ADAMS 






BENNINGTON 


BURLINGTON 



. . . add to this the home counties in which these 21 cities are located and you 
have a richly concentrated market of 2,980,000 people with spendable incomes 
in excess of 3 billion dollars 



LOCALLY 




In the 1 1 county area recognized by the Commerce Department of the 
State of New York as "The Capital District", the actual BMB county by county 
breakdown showing the percentage of radio families comprising a station's weekly 
nighttime audience is as follows: 

COUNTY 

ALBANY 

COLUMBIA 

FULTON 

GREENE 

MONTGOMERY 

RENSSELAER 

SARATOGA 

SCHENECTADY 

SCHOHARIE 

WARREN 

WASHINGTON 

With a BMB average of 90% WGY leads its closest competitor by more 
than 45'r for the combined 1 1 counties of New York State's Capital District. In no 
instance does any area radio station surpass WGY in the number of nighttime 
listeners — even in home counties. In daytime listening one station enjoys a 
slight margin in only one county. Here is the actual station by station comparison 

TOTAL WEEKLY AUDIENCE 

im NIGHT 

428,160 451,230 

163,910 171,940 

107,910 113,360 

115,510 121,220 



VGY 


STATION A 


STATION B 


STATION C 


90% 


82% 


63% 


67% 


84% 


32% 


25% 


35% 


87% 


22% 


14% 


22% 


87% 


19% 


29% 


36% 


96% 


31% 


16% 


21% 


88% 


88% 


53% 


55% 


96% 


57% 


45% 


45% 


91% 


77% 


54% 


52% 


97% 


«% 


— 


16% 


91% 


— 


19% 


18% 


93% 


32% 


30% 


29% 



STATION WGY (50,000 W) 
STATION A (5,000 W) 
STATION B (10,000 W) 
STATION C (1-5,000 W) 



So remember, for complete coverage of a vast 53 county 
area plus concentrated coverage of New York State's 3rd 
market, the Capital District, your best radio buy is WGY. 



A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION Represented Nationally by NBC Spot Sales 



#• \ Time spent with radio 

c&mptired with other media 

1. Percentages of population spending time with radio and other media 
during a typical day 

Source: BBDO Survey, November 1950 

Read SUNDAY NEWSPAPERS __ 93% 

Read DAILY NEWSPAPERS ...... ..... 93% 

Read MAGAZINES 66% 

Listen to HOME RADIO _ 82% 

Listen to RADIO AWAY FROM HOME 25% 

View TELEVISION IN HOME 23% 

View TELEVISION AWAY FROM HOME 10% 



2. How do TV set owners and non-owners differ in their media activities 
during a typical day? 



Source: BBDO Survey, November 1950 



Read SUNDAY NEWSPAPERS 
Read DAILY NEWSPAPERS 

Read MAGAZINES 

Listen to HOME RADIO 

Listen to RADIO AWAY FROM HOME 

View TELEVISION IN HOME 

View TELEVISION AWAY FROM HOME 



NON-TV HOMES 

94% 
93% 
69% 
87% 
24% 



11% 



TV HOMES 

93% 
92% 
60% 
67% 
26% 
87% 
9% 



3. How much do people listen each day per home? 

Source: A. C. Nielsen, Jan. -Feb. 1951 



RADIO ONLY HOMES 



HOMES WITH RADIO & TV 



4.53 HOURS 



2.63 HOURS 



ALL HOMES* 

*Except homes with no radio 

122 



4.06 HOURS 



SPONSOR 



► 






LHYItOlfV LOVES A "MYSTERY* 9 . . . 

rilL "Launches" One With Glamor 



A.DTER1 [SI Vl.\ * 



^ RVHODV loves a mystery 
-and they like 'em better 
rapped up in pretty pack- 
Is how KTUL, the "Show- 
i i" station down Tulsa way, 
■ p with a "natural" to hypo 
r interest in the Tulsa Char- 
3 se Show, May 29 thru June 

ypical KTUL promotion 
t. it launched another poten- 
i ebrity on the Stardust trail 
n Tbig time" — a trail traversed 
i tly by former KTUL'ers. 
j time it was Peggy Fowler — 

ster nt' Tulsa's famous Patti 
, who now is recognized as 
r i's most popular woman 

recently featured in Life 
ne as the disk jockey's darl- 
ose record sales during the 

months totaled 5,000,000, 
I start at KTUL, too. For 
ars — before she hit the "big 
she was KTUL's star vocal- 

f, who closely resembles her 
sister and sings with simi- 
ling, was the sensation of 
lsa Horse Show — billed as 
ystery Singer." 

Hopalong Cassidy was 

on the last two nights of 

jw, ticket sales zoomed from 

ment KTUL and the press 




KTUL's Peggy Fowlrr, right, "Mystery Singer" of the Tulsa Charity llorsr Show, shartd spotlight honors 
with CBS' Hopalong Cassidy. Left, above, Hopalong is welcomed by Mayor George Stoner, right; John Esau, 
vice president general manager of KTUL, and Promotion Manager George Ketcham. Below, I'eggy sing* "Ten- 
nessee Waltz" with Sammy Kayt 's hand. 



began needling folks to guess the 
"Mystery Singer's" identity. 

For the first time, the "SRO" 
sign was hung out for such an 
event in the Tulsa fairgrounds pa- 
vilion. The show was completely 



PWfflfc/ 




sold out for the last three perform- 
ances. 

Masked and lovely Peggy made 
four brief appearances in the arena 
with Sammy Kaye's band — singing 
"Mocking Bird Hill" and "Tennes- 
see Waltz." 

With a 1951 Ford convertible 
contributed by the Oklahoma Dis- 
trict Ford dealers as the prize, 
nearly '20, 000 spectators tried their 
luck at guessing her true name. 

The result was amazing. Eighty 
five per cent of the official entry 
blanks bore the name "Patti Page." 
Another 10 per cent guessed a 
variety of such famous names as 
Peggy Lee, Dorothy Shay, Mar 
garet Whiting, Mary Ford, Martha 
Tilton, .In Stafford, Doris Day, etc. 

The comparative few who 
guessed "Peggy Fowler" shared in 
a drawing for the new automobile 
to climax the final performance, 
when Peggy was unmasked. 

Peggy is featured as "Mrs. Mel 
ody" mi the "Mr. and Mrs. Melody" 
show over KTUL Friday nights al 
7:00, with male vocalist Johnny 
Kirk. 

Youngest of eight musical daugh- 
ters of Tulsa's Mr. and Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Fowler, Peggy may soon 
join the ranks of other "big time" 
artists and radio personalities who 
have KTUL showmanship as their 
background . 



OUSly since his return from service 
in World War II. 

"We don't nerd a Hooper," says 
Viola Noble, advertising manager 
of Clarke's, "to determine what this 
program does for us. We test it 
very carefully — and very periodi- 
cally." 

Harry Clarke, store owner, ap- 
pears personally from time to time 
on the newscast and dues the com 
mercial on some outstanding st\ le 
Or value item. Not only does the 
merchandise sell but literally 

hundreds of people mention having 
heard him on the air. Clarke's 
was using its own version of 
"beamed technique" long before the 
famous Joske survey. 



TULSA'S EXCLUSIVE RADIO CENTER 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 

Radio Station Representatives 
JOHN ESAU, Vice Pies. & Gen. Mgr. 



[ERTISEMENT 



SPONSOR NEWSCAST 13 
YEARS 

Clarke's Good Clothes in Tulsa 
recently signed renewal for "To 
morrow's News Tonight" 
KTTJL, marking 13 years' sponsor- 
ship of the 10:00 p.m. night h ai 
casl without .-i break. Ed Neib 
ace newscaster of KTUL has served 
at the "Mike" for Clarke's continu- 



NOW 

CBS 

IN THE RICH 

FORT SMITH TRADE 

AREA OF WESTERN 

ARKANSAS— 

KFPW 

FORT SMITH, ARKANSAS 

Owned and Operated 
By KTUL 

JOHN ESAU— Vice President 
General Manager 

AVERY-KNODEL, Inc. 

National Representative 



1 . II It vrv listening tahes place 
in the home 

1. Where do they listen in radio homes-only? 

Source: Trendex Survey X (Week of Jan. 16-22, 1951) 




38.9% 44.8% 53.8% 34.3% 33.6% 17.4% 18.5% 15.5% 19.0% 6.5% 2.6% 6.2% 0.9% 1.7% 2.1% 
LIVING ROOM KITCHEN BED DINING PLAY 

ROOM ROOM ROOM 



0.9% 1.8% 1.5% 
OTHERS 



2. In TV homes, where do they listen to radio when TV is on ? 



Source: Trendex Survey X (Week of Jan. 16-22, 1951) 



32.1% 
KITCHEN 



28.6% 

LIVING 

ROOM 



25.0% 

BED 

ROOM 



7.1% 
DEN 




3.6% 
DINING 
ROOM 



J 



3.6% 

PLAY 

ROOM 



3. Where do TV set owners listen to radio when TV is off? 




40.9% 


27.3% 


18.2% 


6.8% 


4.5% 


LIVING 


KITCHEN 


BED 


DINING 


DEN 


ROOM 




ROOM 


ROOM 





124 



2.3% 

PLAY 

ROOM 



SPONSOR 



► 



ONLY A 



THE GEORGIA PURCHASE 



COMBINATION 



OF STATIONS 




WAGA 

ATLANTA 

5,OOOw • 590kc 



'Jvi*y 



MACON 



WMAZ 

MACON 

10,OOOw • 940kc 



CAN COVER 



GEORGIA'S 



MAJOR 



MARKETS 



WTOC 



SAVANNAH 



5,OOOw • l,290kc 



SAVANNAH 



(ALL CBS AFFILIATES) 

THE ( J"'<* OFFERS ADVERTISERS 
AT ONE LOW COST: 

• Concentrated coverage 

• Merchandising assistance 

• Listener loyalty built by local programming 

• Dealer loyalties 

— in three major markets. 



Represented individually and as a group by 



THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT ♦ ATIANTA • DALLAS • KANSAS CITY • LOS ANGELES * SAN FRANCISCO 






• #. Mtadio listening itu TV hownes 

1. How does radio set use vary with length of TV ownership? 



Source: Trendex Survey X (Week of Jan. 16-22, 1951] 



TV Homes 



TV Sets in Use 



One or More j One Radio 
Radios in Use | in Use 



Radio But Not 
TV in Use 




LESS THAN 1 YR. j 61.7% 



2. How does radio listening vary (in New York homes) 
with length of ownership? 

Source: Trendex Survey X (Week of Jan. 16-22, 1951) 



Nine or more 
quarter-hours 

Five to Eight 
quarter-hours 



One to Four 
quarter-hours 



No time spent 



4 * 8 1 




4.4 ~1 



9 MONTHS OR 
LESS 



11.8 



27.9 



55.9 



10 TO 18 
MONTHS 




Radio Listening between 7:00 p.m. and 12:00 midnight 

126 



19 TO 24 
MONTHS 



9.0 



18.8 



25.9 



46.3 



OVER 24 
MONTHS 



SPONSOR 



► 




FIRST AGAIN 



in the Big 
Houston 
ar ket ! 




February-May Hooper Report: 

14 of the FIRST 15 Daytime Shows 
14 of the FIRST 25 Nighttime Shows 
5 of the FIRST 7 News Broadcasts 
Are Heard on KPRC 

KPRC leads by 31% over the second station 

in Total Rated Time Periods 



A-3-51 




5000 WATTS 

NBC and TQN on the Gulf Coast 

JACK HARRIS, General Manager 
Represented Nationally by 
EDWARD PETRY & CO. 




16 JULY 1951 



127 



3. How does radio listening vary with length of set ownership? 

Source: Pulse, Inc. study for WOR, December, 1950 



14.7% 




► 



47^ Increase in 
Radio Listening 
7 p.m. -12 Mid. 



9.6% 



DECEMBER, 1950 



DECEMBER, 1948 



4. What's the difference between radio listening in radio-only homes and radio 
plus-TV homes, by time of day? 



Source: Trendex Survey X (Week of January 16-22, 1951 



43.9% 11.4% 



EVENING 
6-10 P.M. 



27.0% 



17.3% 



AFTERNOON 
12-6 P.M. 



Radio sets-in-use in radio-only 
homes 

Radio sets-in-use in TV homes 




MORNING 
8-12 NOON 



123 



SPONSOR 




WTIC's 50,000 Watts represented nationally by Weed's Co. • Paul W. Morency, Vice-Pres. — Gen. Mgr., Walter Johnson, Asst. Gen. Mgr. — Sales Mgr. 



16 JULY 1951 



129 



how to 

save money 

in television ...by watching 



the ball 



games 



Comes the baseball season, and some people in advertising suddenly 
discover there's more to television than network programs. What 
they "discover" is something as old as broadcasting: Spot program 
advertising. 

For those ball games you see on your screen are Spot programs. So 
is that homemaker show your wife watched yesterday. And that 
Western that had your kids digging spurs in the sofa. And that half- 
hour mystery show, and that feature-length film, etc. 

Yes, Spot programs cover practically every form of television enter- 
tainment. They may be live or film . . . day or night . . . long or short 
. . . directed to the entire family, or to one specific member. They can 
be all these things — and much more. Spot programs can be your 
highway into successful television advertising. 

For Spot program advertising saves you money. Compared to network 
rates, it saves you up to 19% for the same period . . . over the same 
stations. Saves you more than enough to take care of the extra film 
prints involved and their distribution to stations. 

Spot program advertising saves you money in another way. You're 
never saddled with "must" stations, or minimum station requirements. 

And you get more for your money with Spot. You're a more profitable 
customer to the stations. So stations clear time more readily . . . 
cooperate wholeheartedly. 

If you'd like to know more about Spot program television advertising, 
just call any Katz representative. You, too, may find that in tele- 
vision . . . 

you can do better with Spot. Much better. 



K A Z A Ci E N V ■ / INC. Station Representatives 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • ATLANTA • DALLAS • KANSAS CITY 



.- .-,.... -. ... / . • 



9aM»BBaBBBfflnHHBnHBaBinBHBHi 



*'C(^ 



*«1 



■**CE 





'0**0 



nq»Tm oa«OU 




f Ay /0# 



*« 



iOv'H OliQIi 



WTOwtf.g 



"» 



"«0« 



MMaKa 







/* 



/* 






Denver 



*»"Ona 



I "»* ««*iCO 



lo * An e 



Albuquerque 

o 



>» D, e , 



9o 



o 



SEE OTHER SIDE 

Tills map and its supplements include: 

• TV homes by 
markets 

• TV national repre- 
sentatives by stations 

• existiny and planned • TV network affilia- 
intereonnections tions by stations 



• TV cities 



• TV stations 



»!•*» 



Omo 



l^ - 



OKI* NOMA 



Ola|iomo Gt> r 






fort Worth 



Son Antonio ^ 




NBC, ABC, DTN Yes 



NBC, ABC, DTN Yes 



NBC, ABC, DTN 



MBC, ABC, DTN 



No (relay due 

late '52) Petry 



Pearson 



H., R. & P. 



Yes 



NBC, ABC, DTN Yes 



NBC, ABC, DTN 



NBC, ABC, DTN 



Katz 



Katz 



Yes 



Avery-Knodel 



Yes 



Headley-Reed 



MBC, ABC, DTN Yes 



Avery-Knodel 



MBC, ABC, DTN Yes 



H., R. & P. 



MBC, ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Meeker 


MBC, ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Headley-Reed 


endent 
sndent 

3ndent 


No (relay by 
late '51) 


ABC Spot Sales 

Petry 

Katz 

NBC Spot Sales 

Raymer 

Radio Sales 

Blair-TV 









ABC 


DTN 




Yes 

Yes 


Free & Peters 
Petry 


MBC, 


ABC, 


DTN 


Yes 


Branham 


NBC, 


ABC, 


DTN 


Yes 


Free & Peters 


MBC, 


ABC 


DTN 


Yes 


H., R. & P. 



4BC, DTN 




Yes 

Yes 


Petry 

Free & Peters 


MBC, ABC, 


DTN 


Yes 


Petry 


NBC. ABC, 


DTN 


Yes 


Kdf2 



NBC, 


ABC, 


DTN 


No 


Blair-TV 








Yes 


Offices N. Y., Chi., 
Pitts., San Fran. 


ndent 






Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Weed 

Radio Sales 
ABC Spot Sales 
NBC Spot Sales 


ndent 






Yes 


Offices N. Y., CM., 
Bost., San Fran., 
L A., Portland 


indent 






Yes 


Free & Peters 


NBC, 


ABC, 


DTN 


Yes 


Petry 



Oklahoma City (Okla.) 
90,200 TV sets 

WKY-TV 



Omaha (Nebr.) 
78,800 TV sets 

KMTV 
WOW-TV 



CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN 



3 CBS, ABC 

6 NBC, DTN 



No 



Philadelphia (Pa.) 
858,000 TV sets 

WCAU-TV 

WFIL-TV 

WPTZ 



Phoenix (Ariz.) 
38,200 TV sets 

KPHO-TV 



Pittsburgh (Pa.) 
265,000 TV sets 

WDTV 



10 CBS 

6 ABC, DTN 

3 NBC 



Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN No 



Providence (R. I.) 
152,000 TV sets 

WJAR-TV 



CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN 



Yes 



II CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN Yes 



Richmond (Va.) 
82,000 TV sets 

WTVR 



NBC 



Rochester (N. Y.) 
83,100 TV sets 

WHAM-TV 



Salt Lake City (Utah) 
46,600 TV sets 

KDYL-TV 4 

KSL-TV 5 



Yes 



CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN Yes 



San Antonio (Tex.) 
46,100 TV sets 

KEYL 
WOAI-TV 



San Diego (Calif.) 
100,000 TV sets 

KFMB-TV 



San Francisco (Calif.) 
197,000 TV sets 

KGO-TV 

KPIX 

KRON-TV 



Schenectady (N. Y.) 
158,000 TV sets 

WRGB 



NBC 

CBS, ABC, DTN 



No (relay by 
late '51) 



ABC, DTN 
NBC, ABC, CBS 



Katz 



- 



Katz 
Blair-TV 



Radio Sales 

Katz 

NBC Spot Si 



Petry 



Same as WA [ 



Weed (Bos) 
Bertha Ba 



Blair-TV 



Hollingberry 



Blair-TV 

Radio Sales illtl 



No (relay by Blair-TV 
late '52) Petry 



CBS, NBC, ABC 



ABC 

CBS, DTN 
NBC 



Branham i\] 



mii l ABC Spot SaliL, 
No (relay by . , 

Free & Peters ,, 

■! 



Seattle (Wash.) 
85,000 TV sets 

KING-TV 



St. Louis (Mo.) 
293,000 TV sets 

KSD-TV 



Syracuse (N. Y.) 
122,000 TV sets 

WHEN 
WSYR-TV 



CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN Yes 



r 

No (relay by 
CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN late '51) Blair-TV 



NBC Spot Sal 



NBC, CBS, ABC, DTN Yes 



Toledo (Ohio) 
93,000 TV sets 

WSPD-TV 



Tulsa (Okla.) 
74,200 TV sets 

KOTV 



Utica (N. Y.) 
43,500 TV sets 

WKTV 



Washington (D. C.) 
265,000 TV sets 

WMAL-TV 
WNBW 
WTOP-TV 
WTTG 



8 CBS, ABC, DTN 

5 NBC 



Yes 

Yes 



13 



13 



CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN Yes 



CBS, NBC, ABC, 



DTN No (relay by 
1 late '5 2) 



CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN Yes 



Wilmington (Del.) 
69,000 TV sets 

WD EL-TV 



ABC 
NBC 
CBS 
DTN 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



Free & Peters > ' 



Katz 

Headley-Reed 
( Boston— Kettef 
Carter) 



Katz 



Petry 



Coolce 



Katz 

NBC Spot Sali 
Radio Sales 
N. Y. & Chi.— r 
West Coast— R 
ard Railton 



NBC, DTN 



Meelce 



TV Set Total (NBC estimate 1 June, 1951) 
Estimated Sets by 1 September (NBC) 



1 2,769,} 
13,500, 



M ket and stations 






Inter- 




N iber of sets 


Channel 


Affiliation 


connected ? 


Representative 


mquerquc (N. M.) 










8 00 TV sets 










m-Tv 


4 


CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN 


No 


Branham 


Aies (Iowa) 










5 400 TV sets 










\n l-TV 


4 


CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Weed 


A anta (Ca.) 










1 3,000 TV sets 










V GA-TV 


5 


C3S, DTN 


Yes 


Katz 


■b-tv 


8 


ABC, NBC 


Yes 


Petry 


B ti mo re (Md.) 










31,000 TV sets 










V AM 


13 


ABC, DTN 


Yes 


H., R. & P. 


V AL-TV 


II 


NBC 


Yes 


Petry 


V1AR-TV 


2 


CBS 


Yes 


Katz 


Bighamton (N. Y.) 










4 100 TV sets 










VIBF-TV 


12 


CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Boiling 


- mingham (Ala.) 










5,900 TV sets 










V .FM-TV 


13 


CBS, ABC 


Yes 


Radio Sales 


V RC-TV 


4 


NBC, DTN 


Yes 


Raymer 


Gtomington (Ind.) 










1 ,500 TV sets 










VTV 


10 


CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Meeker 


Eston (Mass.) 










71,000 TV sets 






> 




VZ-TV 


4 


NBC 


Yes 


NBC Spot Sales 


V JAC-TV 


7 


ABC, CBS, DTN 


Yes 


Petry 


Effalo (N. Y.) 










2 5,000 TV sets 










\ EN-TV 


4 


CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN 


Yes 


H., R. & P. 


( arlotte (N. C.) 










1 ,900 TV sets 










MTV 


3 


CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Radio Sales 


(icago (III.) 










i 0,000 TV sets 










MKB 


4 


CBS 


Yes 


Weed 


>;nr-tv 


7 


ABC 


Yes 


ABC Spot Sales 
N.Y. — Ben Berentson 


1 5N-TV 


9 


DTN 


Yes 


West — Keenan & 
Eickelberg 


HBO 


5 


NBC 


Yes 


NBC Spot Sales 


ncinnati (Ohio) 










: 8,000 TV sets 










' DPO-TV 


7 


ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Branham 


' (RC-TV 


II 


CBS 


Yes 


Katz 


I..W-T 


4 


NBC 


Yes 


Offices N.Y. Chi. LA. 
Columbus, Dayton 


1 eveland (Ohio) 










t. 7,000 TV sets 










'EWS 


5 


ABC, CBS 


Yes 


Branham 


NBK 


4 


NBC 


Yes 


NBC Spot Sales 


'XEL 


9 * 


ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Katz 


jlumbus (Ohio) 










19,000 TV sets 










BNS-TV 


10 


CBS 


Yes 


Blair-TV 

H. Stovin (Canada) 


LW-C 


8 


NBC 


Yes 


Same as WLW-T 


TVN 


6 


ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Headley-Reed 


allas-Ft. Worth (Tex.) 










21,000 TV sets 










U.D-TV 


4 


CBS 


No (relay due 


) Branham 


FAA-TV 


8 


NBC, ABC, DTN 


late '52) 


Petry 


BAP-TV 


5 


NBC, ABC 




Free & Peters 


avenport-Rock Island 










(Iowa) (III.) 










7,600 TV sets 










'HBF-TV (Rock Island) 


4 


CBS, ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Avery-Knodel 


'OC-TV (Davenport) 


5 


NBC 


Yes 


Free & Peters 


ayton (Ohio) 










30,000 TV sets 










/HIO-TV 


13 


CBS, ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Hollingberry 


/LW-D 


5 


NBC 


Yes 


Same as WLW-T 


fetroit (Mich.) 










91,000 TV sets 










j/JBK-TV 


2 


CBS, DTN 


Yes 


Katz 


/WJ-TV 


4 


NBC 


Yes 


Hollingberry 


^XYZ-TV 


7 


ABC 


Yes 


ABC Spot Sales 


rie (Pa.) 










18,000 TV sets 










/ICU 


12 


CBS, NBC, ABC, DTN 


Yes 


Headley-Reed 



Crand Rapids (Mich.) 
79,000 TV sets 

W LAV-TV 



Greensboro (N. C.) 
69,600 TV sets 

WFMY-TV 



Houston (Tex.) 
80,100 TV sets 

KPRC-TV 



Huntington (W. Va.) 
44,000 TV sets 

WSAZ-TV 

Indianapolis (Ind.) 
138,000 TV sets 

WFBM-TV 

Jacksonville (Fla.) 
32,200 TV sets 

WMBR-TV 



Memphis (Tenn.) 
86,500 TV sets 

WMCT 



Miami (Fla.) 
70,000 TV sets 

WTVJ 




Milwaukee (Wise.) 
243,000 TV sets 

WTMJ-TV 

Minneapolis-St. Paul (Minn.) 
265,000 TV sets 

KSTP-TV 5 

WTCN-TV 

Nashville (Tenn.) 
31,700 TV sets 

WSM-TV 

New Haven (Conn.) 
158,000 TV sets 

WNHC-TV 

New Orleans (La.) 
57,500 TV sets 

WDSU-TV 

New York (N. Y.) 
2,390,000 TV sets 

WABD 

WATV (Newark) 13 

WCBS-TV 2 

WJZ-TV 7 

WNBT 4 
WOR-TV 



CB5 



CB! 



CC! 



CB 



CB: 



Johnstown (Pa.) 






93,100 TV sets 






WJAC-TV 


13 


CB 


Kalamazoo (Mich.) 




38,000 TV sets 






WKZO-TV 


3 


CB 


Kansas City (Mo.) 






122,000 TV sets 






WDAF-TV 


4 


CB 


Lancaster (Pa.) 




101,000 TV sets 






WGAL-TV 


4 


CB 


Lansing (Mich.) 






53,000 TV sets 






WJIM-TV 


6 


CB 


Los Angeles (Calif.) 






933,000 TV sets 






KECA-TV 


7 


AE 


KFI-TV 


9 


Inc 


K LAC-TV 


13 


Inc 


KNBH 


4 


NE 


KTLA 


5 


Inc 


KTSL 


2 


CE 


KTTV 


1 1 


Dl 


Louisville (Ky.) 




92,000 TV sets 






WAVE-TV 


5 


Nl 


WHAS-TV 


9 


CI 




WPIX 

Norfolk (Va.) 
69,100 TV sets 

WTAR-TV 




NSORS: FALL 1951 






><* M 




Note to subscribers: copies of ibis map available free on request 




RCA-NBC research scientists 

and engineers are blazing new paths 

in the use of ultra-high frequencies — to 

increase the nation's enjoyment of television 



World's first custom -6u/lt UHF station 

— points fie way to more TVwr more people 



Although television now reaches 45 
million people in more than 12 million 
homes, thousands of communities are 
still too far from existing stations to be 
reached bv any programs. Moreover, 
under present conditions, many cities 
with limited program service want, but 
can't have, additional TV stations. 

In preparation for the establishment of 
a country-wide television service, RCA has 
pioneered for many years in ultra-high- 
frequency T(UHF) research. 

Today — an experimental station built 
by RCA at Rridgeport, Conn., is supply- 
ing the practical experience and engineer- 



ing facts needed to design the best UHF 
equipment— including transmitters, receiv- 
ers, and converters. NBC programs on the 
air during the full broadcast day are used 
by RCA — and other manufacturers, too — 
for large-scale field tests. 

From results of this pioneering, RCA engi- 
neers have determined that practical UHF 
equipment can be built to serve the public, 
and that present RCA Victor television sets 
can be readily adapted to give equally fine 
performance on both UHF and VHF. 

* * * 
See the latest in radio, television, and elec 
tronics at RCA Exhibition Hall, 36 W. 49th St., 
N. Y. Admission is free. Radio Corp. of Amer- 
ica, RCA Building, Radio City, N. Y. 20, N. Y. 







Built by RCA al Bridgeport, Conn. .-first UHF 
transmitter to opi rati o) lai schedule. 




njiDio conponsiriofii a-f America 

tVor/c/ /^earc/er /n 'fcact/o — T^rsf- in ~7e/ew's/or? 



16 JULY 1951 



135 




FALL in line 

M Coming up! These desirable availabilities— 

SPOT-WISE . . . 

Fall racing from Laurel and Pimlico, Maryland's top tracks, two races every afternoon during meet. 
20 second or 1 minute spots, $62.50; 8 second time signals, $25. 

"The Woman's Angle'* starring Polly Urummond and Ann Marr. 2:45-3:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday. 
20 second or 1 minute spots, $62.50; 8 second time signals, $25. 

"Hollywood Serial Theatre", top stars in screen classics. 3:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday. 
20 second or 1 minute spots, $62.50; 8 second time signals, $25. 

"Slnpapers Television News", live and film roundup of important events. 7:00-7:15 and again at end 
of days programming. 20 second or 1 minute spot (early and late repeat) $100; 8 second time signal, $40. 

"Adventure and Action" theatres, features films for action fans 11:00 p.m. Thursday and Friday 
evenings respectively. 20 second or 1 minute spots, $62.50; 8 second time signals, $25. 

"Hollywood Guest Book", your favorites via Snader Telescription. Sunday afternoons before and 
after Film Theatre of the Air. 20 second or 1 minute spots, $100; 8 second time signals, $40. 

"Boots & Saddles", full-length western for the young in heart. 6:00-6:55 p.m. Monday thru Friday. 
20 second or 1 minute spots, $100; 8 second time signals, $40. 

"Boots & Saddles", Western stars and Western action 10:00 to 11:00 a.m. Saturdays. 20 second or 1 
minute spots, $50; 8 second time signals, $20. 



n> 



PROGRAM-WISE . . . 

"Weather Permitting", (weather forecast) or "Star for Tonight" (Snader Telescription), 6:55- 
7:00 p.m. program strip, Monday thru Friday. 1 time rale. $130 and $20 talent fee. 

"The Collegians" hen talent, 1:00-2:00 p.m. Saturdays. 1 time rate, $550 and $100 talent fee. 
Frequency discounts allowed — 



)WMAR-TV 

CHANNEL 2 * BALTIMORE, MD. 



Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. new YORK • Detroit • KANSAS CITY • San francisco 

CHICAGO • ATLANTA • DALLAS • LOS ANGELES if TELEVISION AFFILIATE OF THE COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 




Daytime is the best bet 

The TV advertiser using spot video is generally wading in un- 
familiar waters. He needs the answers to everything from 
"What precisely is spot television?" to "What kind of rate 
protection can I get?" 

These answers are here, in sponsor's Fall Facts section 
on spot television. The careful reader will learn the latest 
about spot video rates and costs, new developments in spot TV 
programs, valuable tips on how to cut costs in spot TV. 

With sponsors tearing their hair over TV availabilities in 
the spot medium, and timebuyers wondering where to look 
next for a good spot TV buy, sponsor's look-see into the con- 
fused situation on spot TV availabilities will help many ad- 
vertisers get their bearings. 

Other important topics — such as the programing trends 
in spot TV (the result of a nationwide survey of TV stations 
on just this question) — are brought into the limelight. What 
types of shows are on the increase, as well as the decline, at 
TV's local level are outlined for the TV sponsor and his 
agency, with special emphasis on daytime video. Which lead- 
ing advertisers, and product groups, will be heavily in spot 
TV this fall? — this comes in for treatment. 

Where do you go from here? The index at the right will 
-how you. 



Spot TV basics 




138 


Kates and costs 




139 


Availabilities 




140 


Programing 




140 


Freeze 




142 


Network co-op shows 




142 


Network programs availa- 
ble on local stations, chart 


144 


Sponsor trends 




144 



16 JULY 1951 



137 



Snow Crop's H. T. Hamilton (center), Maxon's Pumphrey meet reps at spot TV clinics. Below 
(4th from left), Glenn Gundell, ad and sales mgr, National Dairy Products, is guest of honor 




Spot television basics 



Q. What precisely is spot televi- 
sion? 

A. In the words of one station repre- 
sentative firm. The Katz Agency, Inc.: 
"Spot advertising is not a program 
type . . . it's not a time segment. Spot 



advertising is a distinct advertising 
medium with many important and ex- 
clusive advantages. Spot is the medi- 
um which gives you complete freedom 
of selection among 107 television sta- 
tions, regardless of network affiliation. 
Spot makes possible the utmost flexibil- 
itv in adapting your TV campaign to 
time-zone variations, seasonal varia- 
tions — to all the special requirements 



of your own product and merchandis- 
ing plans." 

Basically, spot TV can be considered 
as market-by-market buying of TV 
time or programs, announcements, par- 
ticipations, and station breaks that 
does not involve network facilities, and 
which operates at local market level. 



Q. When is it wise to use spot 
TV? 

A. The main virtues of spot TV are 
the same as those of spot radio buying 
(see section on spot radio, p. 65). 
However, there are other factors that 
are peculiar to TV alone, i.e.: 

1. Network radio time-and-talent- 
costs have gone up, but at a fairly pre- 
dictable rate. Network television time- 
and-talent costs, on the other hand, 
have been building faster, and nobody 
will predict where they will level off. 

It may be wise to consider spot TV 
if you find that network TV is pricing 
itself out of your budget. A good ex- 
ample of this is the announced decision 
of the Florida Citrus Commission to 
use spot TV in conjunction with other 
media this fall. The Commission rea- 
soned that, if it were to buy a net 
show, as much as $1,500,000 of its two- 
million-dollar budget would be taken 
up by TV network programing. This 
would leave little room for anything 
else. Thus, the fruit growers turnsd to 
spot radio and TV. 

2. The squeeze play is still operat- 
ing when it comes to good network TV 
availabilities, and clearing TV network 
time. The situation for fall doesn't 
look much better. Spot TV may be an 
advertiser's answer, under certain con- 
ditions, if he can't clear the kind of 
network time he wants for a television 



NET CO-OP'S PROVIDE FLEXIBILITY: WHEN CLEARING NETWORK TIME PROVED TOO DIFFICULT, PURE OIL BOUGHT "WHO SAID THAT 




program campaign. (For details, see 
section on network TV availabilities, 
p. 152.) 



Q. How many people can you 
reach with spot TV? 

A. Station reps figure that you can 
reach just as many people with spot 
TV as you can with any other form. 
That means that the potential spot TV 
audience is 61.8% of the families in 
the U. S., via some 13.500.000 TV sets. 



Q. What is the cost-per-thousand 
in spot TV? 

A. Nobody yet has been able to figure 
this out accurately. Specific spot shows 
and spot announcements can be calcu- 
lated when the market, time costs, rat- 
ings, and talent and production charges 
are known. A few timebuyers at agen- 
cies have figures that they use private- 
ly. Biow Company figures show that 
the average TV cost-per-thousand is: 
$1.25, Chicago; $.97, Cleveland; $1.95, 
Columbus; $1.35, New York; $1.00, 
Philadelphia. (Figures are derived 
from NBC-CBS average ratings report- 
ed by Telepulse for December 1950 
projected against estimated costs.) 



Q. Is spot TV still a good testing 
ground for network TV program 
methods? 

A. The costs would be great for night- 
time testing. But for an advertiser who 
wants to get his foot wet in TV, day- 
time spot TV shows or film shows are 
a good pilot operation for possible fu- 
ture network TV. night or day. 

STATIONS WHICH FITTED ITS SALES TERRITORY 



Participating shows in daytrme TV are big spot trend. "3 To Get Ready" is WPTZ hit 





Spot TV time rates 
and costs 



Q. What will the rate situation 
be this fall in spot TV? 

A. By the end of July 1951, about 
half the TV stations in the country will 
have boosted their rate cards over 
spring 1951. This is not the end. Be- 
fore October, there will be additional 
raises in local spot rates. Sample: Ef- 
fective 1 July, the class "A" spot rates 
for one-minute announcements on 
NBC's KNBH. Los Angeles, was 
jumped from $165 to $200. up about 
22%. 

Over-all. if a sponsor wants to have 
the same nationwide spot campaign 
this fall he, had last year in video, us- 
ing the same time slots on the same sta- 
tions, it will cost him about 20% more. 



Q. Will local spot rate increases 
stop any time soon? 

A. No one can answer that. Proba- 
bly not. You can expect to see local 
spot increases for quite some time, fol- 
lowing closely on the pattern of net- 
work TV rate increases. 



Q. What can a sponsor do in TV 
in the face of constantly-rising 
rates? 

A. Basically, he can re-evaluate his 
spot campaigns frequently, as rates 
rise. Since the cost-per-thousand view- 



ers, on whatever time slot or program 
he wants to buy next, may be going 
down even if rates go up, he can spend 
more money — and still get his money's 
worth. 

Or. if there's no more money forth- 
coming in the budget, he can do the 
following: by some judicious timebuy- 
ing, and careful examination of avail- 
abilities, an advertiser can shift his 
money into lower-priced time periods, 
marginal time slots, and lesser-priced 
programs. Daytime programing will 
be a big trend this fall. 



Q. What kind of rate protection 
can a sponsor get in spot TV? 

A. Stations are generally offering the 
usual rate protection. This amounts to 
six months' protection against a rate 
hike, if he renews or buys before the 
new rate goes into effect. 



Q. What is the fall outlook for 
program costs in spot TV? 

A. Local TV stations are up against 
the same situation as the networks. It 
will cost the stations more to sign up 
rights for sports packages, more for 
feature films, more for union labor, 
more for talent fees than it did last 
fall. 

Since the situation changes accord- 
ing to the market, and what the spon- 
sor buys in the market, there is no ac- 
curate, over-all percentage figure. Just 
don't expect your spot program dollar 



i apart from time costs 
it did a year ago. 



to go as far as 



Sp ot TV availabilities Spot TV programing' 



t 



Q. How can an advertiser keep 
down his costs for spot TV? 

A. It all depends on what you re us- 
ing. These are some of the more fre- 
quently-offered suggestions by ad agen- 
cies and reps: 

// you're an announcement user — 
Shop carefully for availabilities. Don t 
buy on the basis of ratings alone. Try- 
to find, with your film producer, cheap- 
er ways of getting the same effective- 
ness out of a film announcement or 
station break. Investigate marginal 
time periods, and daytime TV possi- 
bilities. 

// you're a program user - - Stay 
away from pretentious overhauling of 
successful local TV programs; they're 
usually being done on a tight budget 
and your costs may go up without 
added effectiveness. Examine new pro- 
grams, and new program types care- 
fullv: you can sometimes turn up a 
real buy. Don't just play it safe and 
use only what everybody else uses. Re- 
member that there's a law of supply 
and demand and that TV offers unusu- 
rewards to the creative sponsor. 



STATION 

MANAGER 

AVAILABLE 

(due station sale) 



• j». 



Civic minded 

* Family man 

* Excellent recurd 

* Finest references 



Prefer East 
Henlics cunlidential 

Box 47 

SPONSDH 



Q. What will the availability sit- 
uation be this fall? 

A. It will be at least as tight as last 
year, and in the major TV markets 
even tighter. However, the turnover 
in availabilities will be greater. 

In other words, if you or your agen- 
cy are shopping for local TV time or 
programs, you may find the immedi- 
ate situation this fall extremely tight. 
Then, if you stay on the chase, you'll 
find that good openings will be show- 
ing up periodically. This is due to 
rate hikes, which have started a kind 
of TV musical chairs, causing many- 
advertisers to move into less expensive 
time, marginal hours, and cheaper pro- 
grams. Many advertisers will also stay 
on in their premium times, but cut 
down the frequency. 

All this means that an advertiser 
shouldn't be frightened away from spot 
TV this fall by the seeming lack of 
availabilities. Stick around. They'll 
probably show up if you're persistent. 



Q. Where is it best to start look- 
ing for good spot TV availabilities? 

A. Chances are they'll occur most fre- 
quently in locally-built participation 
programs, especially in daytime hours. 
A sizable number of TV stations are 
concentrating much of their program 
efforts on this type of show in an ef- 
fort to catch some more of the spot 
business that is going begging for lack 
of time. Some agencies and advertis- 
ers, conditioned to thinking of spot TV 
in terms of station breaks and an- 
nouncements, will have to overhaul 
their thinking and timebuying meth- 
ods as a result. 



Q. Will it be easier to clear spot 
TV program time than network? 

A. The outlook for fall, based on a 
SPONSOR checkup of leading reps and 
stations, is "yes.'* Its not that sta- 
tions will have the extra time kicking 
around. But. the station's "take-home 
pay" on a network program buj is an 
average of M) cents in every network 
dollar charged in the base lime rate. 
( In .1 spot I \ liu\ . the station's "take- 
home pay" is an estimated 54 cents in 
the base snot time rale. In other words, 
stations make more money on spot. 
and arc more inclined i<> clear difficull 
time for sponsors. 



Q. What are the main fall trends 
in local-level programing? 

A. From a special SPONSOR survey of 
TV stations on this question, this pat- 
tern emerged: 

ON THE INCREASE— News shows 
are gaining steadily in popularity with 
local video viewers, and are picking 
up plenty of local and national spon- 
sorships. This is due, in part, to the 
high interest in war news and the fact 
that TV news techniques are now be- 
coming more accomplished. WTCN. 
Minneapolis, for example, pointed out 
that "a very healthy increase" had ap- 
peared both in their total of news 
shows and advertisers. 

Good local participating programs, 
usually live musical-variety shows, are 
on the upbeat; are very popular with 
local sponsors giving them a big play. 
Notes WAAM, Baltimore: "The buik 
of WAAM's business on participating 
shows is from the local advertisers, 
with the national sponsors heavy on 
station breaks and nationally-known 
adjacencies." Reports WBKB, Chica- 
go: "WBKB has increased in number 
of clients on participating shows." 
WTVJ. Miami, reports: "With an av- 
erage of 200 different local sponsors 
using WTVJ each month, we have 
found it necessary to open up a lot of 
participating programs. Advertising- 
wise, the trend is to participating 
shows." 

Also due to be around this fall will 
be more feature film programs, more 
local sports packages, more audience- 
participation shows. 

ON THE DECREASE— Except in 
random cases, the audience is wearing 
a bit thin on TV wrestling, one of the 
pioneer program types. Commercial 
educational programs that are based 
primarily on "talk" rather than visual 
appeal are lessening. 

Q. Are there any noticeable trends 
in daytime spot TV programing? 

A. "l es. There's a trend toward build- 
ing local TV programs that is very 
similar to the daytime trend in network 
programing. TV stations have not hit 
upon the same kind of easy formula 
that the local disk jockey represents 
for radio stations. But. the participat- 
ing program, often a showcase built 
around a popular local personality 
akin to radio's "morning man." is be- 



140 



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16 JULY 1951 



ZENITH RADIO CORPORATION | 

6001 West Dickens Avenue, Chicago 39, Illinois 

Please send your free booklet "UHF Television . . . What It 
s . . . What It Means To You.'' 

Name of Dealer 

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City & Slate 

Your Name 

! 2 u 

141 



coming a big factor in program build- 
ing by local TV stations. This fall 
many a daytime program will be con- 
structed around local personalities, of- 
ten radio-recruited. 

With networks beginning to pro- 
gram daytime dramas in TV. there is 
a growing tendency for local TV sta- 
tions to program film packages in the 
daylight hours. These films are usually 
selected so that they are a light, '"mati- 
nee" type to appeal to the distaff view- 
ers. 

Otherwise, the program situation in 
spot TV is pretty much the same as it 
was last fall as regards balance of 
types. The over-all number of spot 
programs on almost every station has, 
however, been stepped up. 

Q. Are there any special program- 
ing trends in nighttime spot TV? 

A. Yes. More stations are going in 
for the type of late-hour film show 
that was pioneered by WPIX, New 
York, with its Night Owl Theatre. 
These are being scheduled in marginal 
time, around midnight usually, and 
are picking up a lot of national spot 
TV business. More nighttime spot TV 
newscasts will be around this fall (most 
big TV stations have increased their 
news staffs since last year ) . Many big 
nighttime sports packages of all types 
will be around, an increase over last 
year. 

Actually, trends in nighttime TV, 
due to lack of time slots in which sta- 
tions can build programs, are less pre- 
dictable than daytime. Most big ad- 
vertisers are looking for good adja- 
cencies for announcements and breaks 
when they go shopping in nighttime 
spot TV. 

Q. Are independent TV stations 
emerging with definite program 
formulas? 

A. There are only six, all in New York 
and Los Angeles (WPIX, WATV, 
WOR-TV, New York; KFI-TV, KTLA. 
KLAC-TV, Los Angeles). Nearly all 
of them are still working out their own 
program formulas. None of them has 
emerged with the kind of clean-cut "in- 
dependent station" formula that was 



A COMPLETE TV film studio. 
In Hollywood (28) since 1938... 

TELEFILM Inc. Live & cartoon. 



made famous by New York's WNEW 
and others in radio. 

Programing on independent stations 
consists mainly of a few low-cost live 
shows (variety, cooking, quiz, etc. i . 
and quite a number of feature film 
shows, Western film shows, sports pro- 
graming, and newscasts. Programing 
is generally set up on a somewhat hit- 
or-miss basis, with no real attempts at 
block programing or programing in 
counterpoint to networks, except in the 
case of sports packages and adjacent 
sports programs. One of these sta- 
tions, at least (KTLA), has achieved 
standout popularity with viewers. 

Eventually, when the freeze is off, 
new stations are on the air, and the 
chaotic current situation settles down 
a bit, definite program formulas will 
emerge at independent TV stations. 



TV freeze 



Q. Will possible lifting of the tel- 
evision "freeze" affect my fall 
plans? 

A. It may affect your fall 1952 plans, 
but fall 1951 is status quo. FCC's 
recent announcement of 2,000 proposed 
TV allocations for new stations in the 
very high and ultra high frequencies 
was like opening the lid to a Pandoras 
box. Far from settling the question of 
new stations, it provides grist for ad- 
ditional argument. 

On 23 July, hearings on these alloca- 
tions are scheduled to open before the 
Commission. It's estimated that be- 
tween 800 and 900 persons are seeking 
to be heard — including educators who 
are out to earmark channels for their 
own exclusive use. An unofficial esti- 
mate, based on normal hearing proce- 
dure, figures it would take about a 
year to hear that many people. Na- 
turally, the hearings will be speeded up 
considerably, perhaps by substitution 
of written for oral testimony. 

Even assuming that everyone agrees 
on allocations and no one sics the Su- 
preme Court on FCC, as has been 
threatened by opponents of the alloca- 
tion plan who question FCC's right to 
set aside channels for education, there 
is Mill a very practical engineering 
problem. There's no shortage of trans- 
mitting equipment right now, despite 
tightening materials controls; in fact 
c\n\ huge manufacturer is shipping 
transmitters out of the country to 



cash-on-the-line foreign customers. But 
there will be a problem with TV re- 
ceivers built to pick up today's very- 
high frequency channels. Most of the 
new crop of stations will have to broad- 
cast in the higher uhf channels. 

Sounds straightforward enough. If 
channels get crowded on one part of 
the spectrum, open up new ones where 
there's more room. But one difficulty 
with ultra-high-frequency operation is 
that the effective transmitting radius 
is only 30 miles, or half of that on 
vhf. And just how good reception will 
be no one knows for sure; it will vary 
drastically according to terrain, since 
electronic waves of this length behave 
much like light waves and can only 
travel in straight lines. 

Further, television set makers will 
need heavy persuading to build a new 
breed of TV set capable of pulling in 
uhf stations. They could, of course, 
make converters. But an extra box 
hooked up to the fancy living room re- 
ceiver has never gone over well in the 
past, either from an engineering or an 
aesthetic point of view. Witness the 
failure of FM converters. 

No, any reservations which may 
have been nourished by the idea of a 
rash of new TV stations — soon — may 
as well be forgotten. It will continue 
to be an increasingly frantic rat-race 
for availabilities on 107 television sta- 
tions for most of another year and 
possibly longer. 



Network eo-op shows 
(TV) 

Q. Are national advertisers using 
more co-op shows as spot pro- 
grams? 

A. Yes. Some national advertisers and 
a few big regional advertisers are be- 
ginning to show up. here and there, 
using co-op programs where they can't 
(1) get network clearance on a station 
for a program, and (2) where they 
can't find a local show that suits their 
advertising purposes. Pure Oil is us- 
ing Who Said That? as a co-op (via 
Lee Burnett) on some 17 NBC-TV af- 
filiates, mostly in the East, buying it 
through station reps rather than 
through network sales. The Campbell 
Soup Company (via Ward Wheelock, 
Philadelphia) is using an ABC-TV 
family comedy co-op, The Haggles, on 
KSD-TV, St. Louis as a pilot spot op- 
eration, and Fort Pitt Brewing Com- 



142 



SPONSOR 





Eyes and Ears 
of a GOOD CITIZEN 



You don't declare yourself a good citizen. That distinction is something 
you earn — through faithful service to your community's needs and aspi- 
rations. 

Ask our fellow citizens in Dayton! WHIO-TV has become the recognized 
forum for Dayton's civic efforts. Dayton turns first to WHIO-TV for 
programs in the public interest — just as Dayton's civic leaders come to 
us first for airtime in support of their most important causes. 

This identification with civic causes has won WHIO-TV a unique place 
in the hearts of a great community. It has established, throughout our 
broadcast period, a listening preference and an audience loyalty which 
we make every effort to continue to deserve. WHIO-TV is represented 
nationally by the George P. Hollingbery Co. 



WHIO-TV 

is currently supporting these worthy organizations 



Armed Forces enlistment 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

Red Cross 

Civil Defense 

Green Cross Safety Campaign 

Community Chest 

Social Security 

Montgomery Co. Ministerial Assn. 

Dayton Council on World Affairs 

U. S. Air Forces 

St. Elizabeth Hospital Fund 



Cancer Drive 

Cerebral Palsy Campaign 

Save- A -Life Campaign 

YMCA 

YWCA 

Dayton Division of Health 

St. Joseph Orphanage 

Boy Scouts 

Girl Scouts 

Public School Activities 

Paint-Up and Clean-Up Week 




WHIO-TV also schedules regular public service features such as the 
weather and market reports; and scheduled public services included reg- 
ularly in participating programs throughout the day. 



Network proyrttms available on lava! stations (TV) 



t 



TITLE 


TYPE 


APPEAL 


NET 


TIME 


TESTED 


EXPLANATION 




AMERICAN FORUM OF THE AIR 


Forum 


Family 


NBC 


30 min, 


l/wk 


yes 


Issues of day discussed by experts 




CACTUS JIM 


West. Adventure 


Juvenile 


NBC 


30 min. 


5/wk 


yes 


Cactus Jim relates tall tales to youngters 




COURT OF CURRENT ISSUES 


Drama 


Adult 


DuM 


30 min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Dicussion of current issues 




DOWN YOU GO 


Quiz 


Family 


DuM 


30 min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Parlor game with pri2es for viewers 




LIFE BEGINS AT 80 


Panel Discussion 


Adult 


ABC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Humorous panel of 5 octogenarians 




MAGIC COTTAGE 


Drama 


Children 


DuM 


30 min. 


5/wk 


yes 


Rendition of fairy tales 




MONDAY NIGHT WRESTLING 


Sports 


Family 


DuM 


3 hrs. 


l/wk 


yes 


Wrestling from Columbia Park, N. J. 




NOT FOR PUBLICATION 


Drama 


Family 


DuM 


15 min. 


2/wk 


yes 


Short short story with newspaper background 




ROLLER DERBY 


Sports 


General 


ABC 


90 min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Madhouse of skates, thrills and spills (resume In 


fall) 


THE RUGGLES 


Family Comedy 


General 


ABC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Family comedy situation with Charlie Ruggles 




SATURDAY NIGHT WRESTLING 


Sports 


Family 


DuM 


3 hrs. 


l/wk 


yes 


Wrestling from Chicago 




SHADOW OF THE CLOAK 


Suspense Drama 


Family 


DuM 


ill min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Helmut Dantine in counter-espionage dramas 




STUDS' PLACE 


Dramatic 


General 


ABC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Informal program portraying human relationships 




THEY STAND ACCUSED 


Drama 


Family 


DuM 


60 min, 


l/wk 


yes 


Authentically reproduced courtroom dramas 




WASHINGTON REPORT 


Discussion 


Family 


DuM 


15 min. 


2/wk 


yes 


Tris Coffin moderates panel discussion 




WHO SAID THAT? 


News Quiz 


Family 


NBC 


30 min, 


l/wk 


yes 


Bob Trout. J. C. Swayze and guest panel 




WRESTLING FROM CHICAGO 


Sports 


General 


ABC 


2' 2 hrs. 


l/wk 


yes 


Popular wrestling bouts 





pany is sponsoring ABC-TVs Wres- 
tling from Chicago on WEWS. Cleve- 
land, and three Pennsylvania ABC-TV 
affiliates. More may go co-op soon. 



Q. What networks carry co-ops? 

A. Video co-ops. you'll find, follow 



FOR QUICK, EASY 

REFERENCE TO 
YOUR COPIES OF 

SPONSOR 



get the 

beautiful 

SPONSOR 



binder 

BINDER ORDER FORM 



at only 

$ 



4 



SPONSOR 

510 Madison Ave. 

New York 22 

Please send me Binder holding 13 is- 
sues and bill me later. 



NAME 
FIRM 



ADDRESS 



CITY ZONE STATE 

□ $4 one binder □ $7 two binders 

IMPORTANT: Binders come in two sizes 
il) to fit your 1950 issues of SPONSOR & 
(2l the somewhat larger 1951 issues. Please 
write numbers 1 or 2 in boxes to indicate 
size of binder desired. 



very much the same pattern they do at 
radio networks. The senior networks 
don't go in for them much, hut the oth- 
er networks find them valuahle in 
rounding out their schedules, and in 
providing stations with network-cali- 
bre programs available for sale at the 
local level, sponsor's latest checkup 
shows ( see above ) that DuMont has 
5.V, of them. ABC-TV slightly more 
than 29' , . and NBC the rest. 



Q. What's the outlook for fall in 
TV co-ops? 

A. I his depends to a large extent on 
the possible lifting of the "freeze" on 
new TV stations. As things stand now. 
networks are sometimes leery of start- 
ing up a co-op series, because it's hard 
to recapture the time for a national 
advertiser, many of whom are pressing 
TV networks for availabilities they 
haven't got. If the freeze should come 
off. look for more co-op shows to de- 
velop in morning and afternoon hours. 
According to network co-op sources, 
these would probabh be inostl) day- 
time drama, homemaking, news and 
sports shows. Costs would be in line 
with local TV shows. 



Spot TV's big* sponsors 



Q. Who will be among the big 
users of spot TV this fall? 

A. A checkup b\ SPONSOR of station 
reps and timebuyers shows thai these 



clients I not necessarily in order of 
billings i will be among the leaders 
when it comes to spot TV time pur- 
chases this fall. Procter & Gamble, 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet. Lever Broth- 
ers, R. J. Reynolds, Liggett & Myers, 
Rhodes Pharmacal, Rival Packing Co., 
Ronson, Schwinn bicycles. Standard 
Brands, General Foods. Time Inc., 
Ward Baking. Trico Products, Wild- 
root, and the various auto divisions of 
Chrysler. Ford and General Motors. 



Q. What product categories will 
be active in spot TV this fall? 

A. As in spot radio, the expectation 
for fall is that the leading food, drug 
and soap manufacturers will be at the 
top of the heap in spot TV spending. 
Auto advertising, plus the advertising 
for auto accessories, has been lighter 
the early part of this year than last, 
but is expected to bounce back strong- 
l\ if the squeeze comes off scarce mate- 
rials and credit controls case a bit. 
Much the same thing holds true for 
appliances and radio-TV sets, since 
dealer inventories are riding high and 
most dealers arc eyeing the Christinas 
season as a good one for them. 

Beer and wine sponsors will be back 
heavil) in spot TV this fall, since evi- 
dences of local successes for this prod- 
uct categor) arc good. There will be 
some activitj on the part of leading 
gas and oil firms in spot T\ . but most 
of the leading air advertisers in this 
categor) are spending large amounts 
in nelwoik TV. 



144 



SPONSOR 



A SEMES FEATURING THE MEN WHO HAKE FKEE & PETERS THEIINHN SERVICE 




1 




U, 

s all Tl- 




Keith T. McKeiiey! 



When Keith McKenney decided to "get 
in on the ground floor of television", 
he really went all out — spent three 
years as camera man, stage manager, 
program supervisor, production man- 
ager and script-writer, and then added 
three more years in television sales, 
before joining F & P. Today, Keith 
obviously qualifies as a true Television 
Specialist, and is anxious and ready 
to serve you. 

"Serving you" is the main reason our 
TV department has grown so tremen- 
dously in the past few years, even 



though these years have of course been 
ones of enormous growth for television 
in general. New men, new accounts, 
new highs in billing — they're all a 
reflection of F & P's basic philosophy 
that our biggest job is to help you get 
the greatest possible value for your 
TV dollars. 

We think a visit with any one of our 
"Colonels" will convince you that we 
really work at that job — and that we 
do it well, here in this pioneer group 
of radio and television station repre- 
sentatives. 








University of Michigan (R.A.) 

Two years, U. S. Navy 

Three years, General Electric Co. 

Five years, WWJ-TV, Detroit 

Free & Peters (Detroit Office* 
since February. 1951 







EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL 

TELEVISION 

REPRESENTATIVES 

DAVENPORT WOC-TV* 

(Central Broadcasting Co. — 
WHO-WOC) 

FORT WORTH-DALLAS WBAP-TV* 

(STAR-TELEGRAM) 

LOUISVILLE WAVE-TV* 

(WAVE, Inc.) 

MIAMI WTVJ 

(Womctco Theatres) 

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL WTCN-TV 

(DISPATCH-PIONEER PRESS) 



NEW YORK 



WPIX 



(THE NEWS) 



ST. LOUIS KSD-TV* 

(POST-DISPATCH) 

SAN FRANCISCO KRON-TV* 

(THE CHRONICLE) 



♦ Primary NBC Affiliates 



^ Free & Peters, inc. 

l/\ \ Pioneer Radio and Television Station Representatives Since 1932 



fORK 



CHICAGO 



DETROIT 



ATT.WTV 



FT. WORTH 



HOLLYWOOD 



SAN FRANCISCC 



ami semeat park 



SERVICE STATIONS 



SPONSOR: Cone> Man.l AGENCY: Chester C. Moreland 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This Cincinnati park called 
at ten lion to its L951 opening day with a TV expenditure 
oj a few hundred dollars. The promotion: TV Rangers 
sponsorship ami other participations announcing the 
opening oj all park facilities. A tabulation of opening 
day attendance figures showed 14.521 persons flocked to 
('oney Island compared to 8,500 on the same day a year 
before without Tl ; weather conditions were the same. 

WLW-T, Cincinnati PROGRAM: TV Rangers; Participations 







SPONSOR: Shell Oil Co. AGENCY: J. Walter Thompson 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Shell inaugurated a 15-min- 
ute. Monday to Friday newscast featuring Al Constant. 
After the first show, Constant interviewed two Shell deal- ■ 
ers. One reported 27 new customers the day after the 
first newscast; the second dealer had two new customers 
waiting for service early that same day. Other Shell sta- 
tions in the area find gas-oil sales climbing steadily up- 
ward since the TV show started. Cost: $360 per program. 

KRON-TV. San Francisco PROGRAM: Shell News 



POTATO CHIPS 



SPONSOR: H. W. Lay & Co. AGENCY: Liller, Neal & Battle 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Oscar's Prize Party fea- 
tures on-camera phone calls to children interspersed with 
Western songs. Each child called wins a prize for answer- 
ing a question correctly; gets a chance to win a bicycle. 
The slant: youngsters must send in a picture of Oscar cut 
from a bag of Lay's potato chips — along with name, ad- 
dress, age, and phone number. Results: 58,238 pieces oj 
mail in five months denoting a sales gross of $8,734.70 
at the very minimum. Once-weekly program cost: $90. 

WSM-TV, Nashville PROGRAM: OscaFs Prize Parly 



HAIR PREPARATION 



ICE CREAM 



SPONSOR: Charles Antell Co. 



AGENCY: Hare 



CAPS! LE C WE HISTORY: The sponsor ran a half-hour 
film program, one-lime, offering hair care advice and sell- 
ing a lanolin hair preparation and a combination comb- 
brush. Viewers were asked to phone in their orders or 
write to WAAM for the offer. From this single half-hour 
costing $390. Antell reported a total of 612 cash orders 
or a gross return of some $1,500 on their Tl film venture. 
This Baltimore hair preparations firm is now sold on TV. 



W \ Wl. Haiti 



PROGB Wl: Film Feature 



FOOD SLHEISS 



SPONSOR: I eemsti i & I ... \GE\<A : Direct 

CAPS1 LE CASE HISTORY : Five-minute afternoon and 
riming participations on a three-a-a eel; basis called at- 
tention to the com pain's food slicer. The pi/eh: a direct 
mail ordei deal on the Pal 'n Johnnj show. Over a peri- 
od of three months. Feemster reported sales oj 2(1.1100 
units at a dollai apiece with an advertising expenditure 
of approximately $1,000. And the sponsor adds TV was 
the only medium "selling" for them. 

VWi/ I \. D.-ir.iii PROGR Wl: Pal 'n Johnnj 



SPONSOR: Costa's Ice Cream Co. 



AGENCY: A. W. Lewin 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Ice cream sales were off 
more than 12% in Costa's area when they started Tl 
sponsorship. But, in spite of this, Costa sides after 19 
shows ($450 per program) went way up; distribution- 
ivise they tripled dealer outlets: and the sales department 
found dealer resistance virtually eliminated. One new 
dealer informed Costa that his ice cream sales doubled 
in the first two weeks of his Costa franchise. 



WATV. Newark 



ROOKIJTTS 



WTMJ-T\. Milwaukee 



PROGRAM: Junior Frolics 



SPONSOR: I. nick Dairy Co. AGENCY: Al Herr 

> M'SULE CASE HISTORY: This firm wanted to ac- 
quaint viewers with three different types of recipe book- 
lets. Their purpose: to increase usage of milk and milk 
products in cooking. Three $75 participations heralded 
the free offers. And mail response to these TV commer- 
cials amounted to 327 requests for egg booklets; 1,347 
mail returns for milk booklets; 1,742 responses for meat 
booklets — total of 3,410 requests from three participations. 



PROGRAM: What's New 



-L^ 




The most modern method of teaching small 
children to read — the method by which new 
teachers are trained at Millersville State 
Teachers' College — was recently featured on 
"MSTC Presents" on WGAL-TV. Every 
other Sunday afternoon at three o'clock, 
living rooms in the WGAL-TV area become 
schoolrooms for one-half hour. Hundreds of 
adults learn broadening, worthwhile facts 
about today's living, are taught new, help- 
ful, skills. Professor George Anderson of 
Millersville State Teachers' College is the 
moderator on these educational telecourses 
which have covered such subjects as: a series 



on the use of the slide ride; a program on 
leatherworking; a demonstration and in- 
struction period in carving; a program on 
linoleum cuts. Wide public interest, in llii:- 
one of many community service programs 
carried on WGAL-TV, is evidenced in the 
fact that after each show the station receives 
an average of 180 requests for a copy of the 
complete program proceedings. 

WGA L T V 

LANCASTER, PENNA. 

A STEINMAN STATION • Clair R. McCollough, Pres. 



NBC 




T V. AFFI UATF. 

Represented by 

ROBERT MEEKER ASSOCIATES Chicago . San Francisco . New York . Los Angeles 



16 JULY 1951 



147 



t 







if 






• 



used in locating best radio relay routes 



Network television rides micro- 
waves in the Bell System's new 
radio relay systems and travels un- 
derground in coaxial cables. About 
half of the total television channel 
mileage is now provided by radio 
relay. 

BEST ROUTES FOUND 

But which are the best locations 
for the radio relay stations? No 
charts exist for microwave routes. So 
Bell System engineers pioneer — pore 
over maps and aerial photographs 
to plot possible station locations. 



Then scouting parties take over. 
They cross the country step by step 
testing the most likely routes. Like 
rays from gigantic searchlights, mi- 
crowaves are shot from point to 
point to determine which of the 
proposed paths are most suitable. 

200-FOOT STATIONS 

Then the costly construction be- 
gins. Relay stations — some over 200 
feet high — span forest, mountain 
and plain. 

Facilities valued at $73,000,000 
are now used by the Bell System for 



television purposes. This includes 
radio relay systems, coaxial cable 
and associated equipment — 18,000 
miles of television channels. 

COST KEPT LOW 

Yet the cost of this service is 
relatively low. The Telephone Com- 
pany's total network facility charges 
average about 10 cents a mile for a 
half hour of program time, includ- 
ing both audio and video channels. 
This averages less than 5 per cent 
of the total cost of a typical drama, 
comedy or variety program. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 



PROVIDING NETWORK TRANSMISSION CHANNELS FOR THE RADIO AND TELEVISION INDUSTRIES TODAY AND TOMORROW 




M8 



SPONSOR 




Standing room only 

What's happening in network television these days? What's 
going to happen this fall? What about network rates and 
availabilities, program trends, color television, daytime tele- 
vision, nighttime television? 

Here's where you're going to find many of the answers re- 
garding network television that you've been seeking this sum- 
mer. Here are facts compiled from top network executives, 
producers, film men, color experts, manufacturers, time- 
buyers, agency executives and leading research organizations. 

sponsor's Fall Facts section on network TV gives you 
network-by-network facts on fall rate increases, how the fall 
situation on availabilities shape up, what to do when you 
can't clear network time. 

Programing, too, is thoroughly examined. The new trends 
in shows — the general trends, as well as daytime and night- 
time — are discussed. Included are new developments in TV 
talent, the growing "star system" in TV, how nighttime pro- 
gram types stack up against daytime counterparts, on the ba- 
sis of popularity. 

You'll find the latest facts here regarding color TV — the 
still uncertain subject which has created more talk in the 
industry than anything in recent years. 

The index at the right shows the location of these TV topics. 



\«'i TV circulation 


150 


Time and program costs 


150 


Availabilities 


152 


Program trends 


152 


Available net packages, 
chart 1 53, 


154 


Leading net TV clients 


156 


Leading ad agencies 


157 


Color TV 


158 


C'oast-to-coast video 


158 


Kinescopes 


158 


Alternate-week programing 


159 



16 JULY 1951 



149 




BIG COMEDY: RESULTS ARE GOOD, RATINGS ARE HIGH. BUT, WEEKLY BUDGETS ARE RAPIDLY NEARING THE $100,000 MARK 



Network TV circulation 

Q. What will the circulation of 
network TV be this fall? 

A. Bv network estimates, the 107 op- 
erating television stations in 63 mar- 
kets ( 61 by CBS's estimate, which fig- 
ures that there is some overlap) will 
be reaching 13.500.000 TV sets and 
61.8'v of the families in the nation. 
There are no more TV stations today 
than one year ago; there wont be any 
more by fall. With set sales moving 
slowly, due to the normal summer 
slump in appliance sales, uncertainty 
over color in the publics mind, near- 
sat-uration in some markets (like New 
York. Chicago. Baltimore, etc.), and 
tighter consumer credit controls, the 
number of sets in markets will be 
about the same. too. 



Network TV time and 
program costs 



Q. What is the rate situation go- 
ing to be this fall on the TV net- 
works? 

A. Over-all, network TV rates will be 
up an average of some 15% by 1 Oc- 
tober as compared with June 1951. 
This includes all raises in all time clas- 
sifications on all networks. 

Network increases are not necessar- 
ily proceeding on a flat network basis 
between now and fall. Rather, they are 
constantly affected by station-by-station 
upward adjustments in rate cards. 

Most rate increases seem to be fall- 
ing into this pattern: 

1. Rates are holding fairly steady in 
most large TV markets where three or 
more stations are now operating and 



the set market is fairly well saturated. 
A few NBC-TV and CBS-TV owned- 
and-operated stations are making up- 
ward adjustments, but the raises are 
mostly at affiliated stations. 

2. Rates are climbing (including 
special raises in between those gener- 
ally announced by the networks) at af- 
filiated stations, particularly those in 
non-interconnected areas or where TV 
is still novel and sets are selling strong. 



Q. What specific raises can you 
look for this fall at networks? 

A. At CBS-TV, there was a rate hike 
that went into effect 1 July amounting 
to 12.89( average increase. This will 
vary somewhat in specific time seg- 
ments, it is well to note. There will be 




Serials: A costly daytime trend. "Miss Susan" for C-P-P 



Daytime Glitter: "Kate Smith" success proves the ladies want variety 



150 



SPONSOR 




Situation Comedy: Growing trend, "Amos 'n' Andy" among hopefuls Mysteries: Still strong. More will have documentary approach 



other raises coming in periodically 
from various stations in August, Sep- 
tember and October, so that by fall 
the over-all rate increase for CBS-TV 
will be about 20' < as compared to 
June 1951. 

NBC-TV hiked its rates approxi- 
mately 23.5% on 1 July, and does not 
expect to have any more raises be- 
tween that date and the fall. However, 
individual stations affiliated with NBC- 
TV may do some rate adjusting up- 
wards between now and fall. 

ABC-TV expects to follow the NBC- 
TV pattern to some extent between now 
and fall. As of 1 August, there will be 
rate increases on the ABC-TV owned- 
and-operated stations in New York, 
Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, and 
San Francisco. These rate increases 
will average 23%, and up to 41.5% 
for the basic Class "A" time rate on 
KGO-TV, San Francisco. ABC-TV 
does not anticipate any rate increases 
on its affiliated stations between July 
and fall (the network had not received 
any of the usual 30-day notices of in- 
creases from TV affiliates as sponsor 
went to press), but it is likely that 
there will be increases by individual 
outlets. 

DuMont does not anticipate rate in- 
creases by its owned-and-operated sta- 
tions between now and fall. The affili- 
ates may be another story, although 
DuMont has not been notified of any 
affiliate rate hikes as of 1 July. 

Q. Are rate increases predictable, 
as far as an advertiser is con- 
cerned? 

A. No. Stations hike their rates, and 
networks boost the rates on owned-and- 



operated stations, when they feel that 
the number of sets in a market justify 
the increase. Nearly all of the TV 
broadcasters in the country are trying 
to recoup their losses and investments, 
get into the black. Generally speaking, 
the cost-per-thousand viewers is less 
even after rate hikes than a vear ago. 



Q. Do rate increases usually hit 
hardest in a particular time classi- 
fication? 

A. To some degree, rate hikes usually 
hit hardest on "Class A" nighttime net- 
work rates. This is a case of supply 
and demand, since this time classifica- 
tion is usually most sought after. How- 
ever, network rates — when there is an 
increase — go up in all classifications. 
A sponsor can sometimes pick up a 
bargain in a "lower" time classifica- 
tion when rates are rising, provided he 
investigates carefully the audience 
composition of other time slots. 

Q. What kind of rate protection 
does a sponsor get these days in 
network TV? 

A. The usual — six months from the 
time the new rates go into effect, if he 
renews or buys before the effective date 
of increase. 



Q. When will rate increases slow 
or stop entirely at TV networks? 

A. Nobody knows. The relatively- 
steady situation in radio network op- 
eration (as compared to TV) was 
reached only after many years, and af- 
ter a near-complete saturation of the 
entire U. S. with radios and stations. 



Magazines have recently been jacking 
up rates on the basis of increased op- 
erating costs. 



Q. What about program costs on 
TV networks this fall? 

A. Here, too, costs are continuing up- 
ward. They are the result of increased 
prices for materials, costumes, sets, 




Color: New commercial power on TV's horizon 




Home Show: Trend away from fact stanzas 



16 JULY 1951 



151 



r 



etc., plus higher prices for talent, union 
labor, literary rights, rehearsals, and 
so forth. How costs today compare 
with three years ago was pointed out 
recently in Time magazine, in writing 
about Ed Sullivan and the Lincoln- 
Mercury variety program Toast of the 
Town on CBS-TV. According to Time, 
the talent on the first show, which in- 
cluded the fabulous team of Rodgers & 
Hammerstein, cost a mere $270 — prac- 
tically a donation of services. Today, 
Ed Sullivan admitted candidly, he 
"couldn't get the same people . . . for 
less than $12,000." 

Pointed out Hubbell Robinson, Jr., 
CBS V.P. in Charge of Network Pro- 
grams, to sponsor: "Certainly costs 
will continue upward, sometimes at a 
rapid rate, on network TV shows. How- 
ever, the over-all average rise in show 
costs is lagging behind the increases 
in the nationwide cost-of-living." 

CBS's Robinson also added that it 
still costs "a minimum of $5,000 a 
week on top of almost any type of ma- 
jor program's costs" to put the show 
on film. 



\etwork tinie 
availabilities 



Q. What will the situation be this 
fall on clearing TV network time? 

A. Good network time availabilities 
will be impossible for you to clear this 
fall, and will continue to be a difficult 
problem until such time as the lifting 
of the television freeze brings in new 
stations. With 40 ((>3..V,I of the 
nation's 63 video markets still being 
served by only one station, any new 
network advertisers coming in this fall, 
will only complicate the clearance prob- 
lem further. 

Q. Will it be easier to clear time 
on one TV network than on an- 
other? 

A. Not really but you'll find, accord- 
ing to some preliminary checks b\ 
agency timebuyers, that the networks 
which have the most 52-week TV 
business will in some few cases be 
ea-icr to clear time with. This is be- 
cause these networks (NBC-TV and 
CBS-TV) have relinquished less time 
to the stations, to be sold locally or 
cleared for another network, due to 
hiatus of advertisers. No networks, in- 
cidentally, will now guarantee to recap- 



ture TV time for you after a hiatus, 
although they will do it in radio. 



Q. What can an advertiser do if 
he can't clear network time in the 
amount that he wants for a live- 
origination show? 

A. He can do one of three things: I 1 I 
he can take what live time he can get 
in interconnected cities, and use kine- 
scopes of his show on other "network" 
stations; (2l he can put his program 
on film, at added cost, and place it 
through his agency as a spot opera- 
tion; or (3) he can shift over to a 
large-scale timebuying operation of 
spot programs and announcement 
availabilities; he can go into the day 
or night participation programs now 
being set up by all networks to meet 
the crisis and accommodate more ad- 
vertisers who would otherwise be fro- 
zen out of television. 



Q. Who are some of the leading 
advertisers who have made a 
change from straight TV network 
programing to spot programing? 

A. One of the outstanding examples is 
Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Company, 
which could not clear premium "live" 
network time for its Bigelow Theatre. 
At last report, Bigelow-Sanford, 
through Y&R. is using its filmed show 
on some 34 stations on a spot basis, 
reaching the markets it wants with a 
span of a few days at most between 
airings of a single film. Others in- 
clude: Snow Crop Marketers I through 
Maxon ) with the Snow Crop Matinee 
Theatre; Pepsi-Cola (through Biow) 
with the Faye Emerson Show; Rose- 
field Packing (through Guild. Bascom 
and Bonfigli I with Skippy Hollywood 
Theatre (as in radio); and Kellogg 
Company (through Leo Burnett) with 
Wild Bill Hickok. 



Q. What are some of the advan- 
tages in shifting from the use of 
network kinescopes to straight 
spot buying for filmed programs? 

A. As the, result of a recent study of 
the situation on network availabilities, 
the Katz Agency (station reps) points 
out that "for the same time, on the 
same stations, you pa) up to \.9% less 
when you buy the period on spot than 
when you buy it on a network." This. 
• if course, is because spot rates are low- 
er than network rates. The Katz point 
of view is thai network kinescopes, 



widely used because of lack of station 
availabilities, make networks virtually 
a spot operation. Also. Katz adds, the 
spot method avoids waste circulation, 
assures the advertiser of promptness in 
airing his film, avoids the relatively 
poor quality of kinescope films, does 
not add to program costs appreciably 
if the program is already on film; and, 
since the revenue is more for a station 
by this method, stations will be more 
inclined to do a good promotion job. 

Q. Are there any disadvantages to 
this method? 

A. For some advertisers, there are. 
Spot buying takes the campaign out 
from under network rates, but also out 
from under the networks' services, like 
national publicity, co-ordinated audi- 
ence promotion, network routing and 
handling of film shipments, and "sales 
service" ( which may run from giving 
technical advice to a program assis- 
tance ) . If an advertiser feels he needs 
these services on a national basis, part 
of his spot savings may be swallowed 
up in hiring free-lance firms or in pay- 
ing agency overtime. 

Q. Would lifting the freeze re- 
move the advantages of spot pro- 
gram buying? 

A. No. It would take a lot of the pres- 
sure off advertisers who have been 
forced into spot buying by the lack of 
live network time slots. But. the basic 
advantages (cost, flexibility I remain 
the same. 



Program trends in 
network TV 



Q. What will be the main pro- 
graming trends this fall in network 
TV? 

A. After three big seasons of network 
TV shows, networks, package produc- 
ers, clients, and agencies have a lot of 
experience to draw upon. Generally, 
the main programing trends shape up 
like this: 

PROGRAMS: Most of the big. su- 
per-duper comedy-variety shows that 
were around earlier this year, such as 
Colgate Comedy Hour, Texaco Star 
Theatre, Show of Shows, will be back 
— but there will be few new ones, since 
costs for this type of show have sky- 
rocketed. 

I /'lease turn to page 154) 



152 



SPONSOR 



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VE ALLEN SHOW 



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STAR REVIEW 



/ AZING MR. MALONE 



THOR. AUTHOR 



J BARBER'S CLUBHOUSE 
ND DATE 



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MEO THEATER 



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PITOL CLOAKROOM 



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JDERELLA STORY 



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IE IN AMERICA 



IME PHOTOGRAPHER 



RAINE DAY SHOW 



AN DAVIS SHOW 



ICTOR NEXT DOOR 



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ALTENBORN IN THE NEWS 



ID GLOVES 



RANKIE LAINE SHOW 



AND OF OZ 



ANGFORD-AMECHE SHOW 



EAVE IT TO THE MEN 



UTH LYONS 



ED MACK FAMILY HOUR 



IAGIC ISLAND 



IEET YOUR COVER GIRL 



IIDNIGHT NEWS 



EXPLANATION 



Variety 


Family 


CBS 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$12,500 




yes 


Variety show with new comic 


Variety 


Family 


CBS 


15 mln, 


5 wk 


$8,500 
$1,750 


(51 
(1) 


yes 


Hour long daytime show available in '/* hr. segs 


Variety 


Family 


NBC 


60 mln. 


l/wk 


$60,000 




yes 


Top comics on rotating weekly basis w guests 


Drama 


Family 


ABC 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$7,500 




yes 


Murder-packed Craig Rice detective stories 


Drama 


Family 


ABC 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$7,000 




yes 


Dramatizations and discussions of new plays 


Sports 


Family 


CBS 


30 mln. 


1 wk 


$3,850 




yes 


Sports quiz show with 9-14 yr. old contestants 


Variety 


Family 


ABC 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$7,000 




yes 


College boys and Gl's vie for glamour dates 


Comedy 


Family 


NBC 


1 hr. 2/wk 


$6,075 




yes 


Ben Blue and variety acts 


Drama 


Family 


NBC 


30 mln 


l/wk 


open 




no 




Interview 


Family 


CBS 


15 min 


2/wk 


$3,215 


(1) 


yes 


Boy and girl marry on program, receive gifts 


Drama 


Family 


NBC 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$5,925 




yes 


Outstanding drama in arena technique 


Serial 


Family 


NBC 


15 min. 


5/wk 


$1,900 




yes 


Daytime serial 


Panel 


Family 


CBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$1,975 




yes 


Interviews with top statesmen 


Variety 


Family 


CBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$16,500 




yes 


New comedienne and guests 


Sports 


Male 


CBS 


15 min. 


l/wk 


$2,750 




yes 


Red Barber, guests, sport highlights of week 


Variety 


Children 


NBC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$3,750 




yes 


Ed Herlihy M.C.. and talented children 


Serial 


Family 


NBC 


15 mln, 


5/wk 


$1,900 




yes 


On film 


Drama 


Family 


NBC 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$11,878 
TV) 


(AM & 


yes 


Dramas of Impact of time on human lives 


Drama 


Family 


ABC 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$11,000 




no 


Based on experience of Luko S. May, criminologist 


Drama 


Family 


ABC 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$11,000 




no 


Documentaries on crime investigations 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30 min. 


2/mo 


$12,500 




yes 


Richard Carlyle as Casey 


Interview 


Family 


ABC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$2,500 


per V* hr. 


yes 


Celebrity interviews and hit tunes 


Comedy 


Family 


CBS 


30 min. 


2/mo 


$23,500 




yes 


Comedy In a hat shop 


Serial 


Family 


NBC 


15 mln. 


5/wk 


$1,700 




yes 


Daytime serial 


Quiz 


Family 


DuM 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$4,152 




yes 


Parlor game with prizes 


News 


Family 


CBS 


15 min. 


l/wk 


$1,850 




yes 


Available Sat. night 


Panel 


Family 


CBS 


30 mln. 


1 wk 


$2,500 




yes 


CBS newsmen and guests on current topics 


Drama 


Family 


ABC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$8,500 




no 


Mystery series featuring suave amateur sleuth 


Adventure 


Juvenile 


NBC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$5,850 




yes 


Filmed adventure serial 


Drama 


Family 


NBC 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


open 




no 


Dramatic adventure written by Ben Hecht 


Variety 


Family 


CBS 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$4,750 




yes 


Kid performers and orchestra 


Interview 


Family 


NBC 


15 min, 


5/wk 


$1,370 
$6,250 


(1) 

(5) 


yes 


Poetry, philosophy, and guests 


Drama 


Family 


DuM 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$3,668 




yes 


Suspenseful mystery 


News 


Family 


DuM 


15 mln. 


5/wk 


$2,089 




yes 


Newsroom setting: Bill Brennan as newscaster 


Kitchen 


Female 


CBS 


30 mln. 


5/wk 


$1,914 Partic. 
spilt net 


yes 


Top homemakers' program with Louise Leslie 


Panel 


Family 


CBS 


30 min. 


5/wk 


$7,200 
$1,600 


(5) 
(1) 


yes 


Experts and a panel of children 


Audience Partic. 


Women 


ABC 


30 mln. 


l/wk 


$2,000 
partic. 


per 


yes 


Household hints, etc., by Jessie DeBoth 


Variety 


Juvenile 


ABC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$4,000 




yes 


A county fair show for kids 



Family 



Sports 



Family 



15 min. 
30 mln. 



l/wk 



News interpretation 



l/wk 



$4,050 



Kids 3-12 in boxing bouts 



Variety 



Family 



30 mln, l/wk 



$15,150 



Mr. Rhythm'' goes to town 



Fantasy 



NBC 



30 mln. l/wk 



open 



Filmed puppets 



Variety 



Family 



ABC 



Family 



30 min. 



5/wk 
l/wk 



$2,500 per !/ 4 hr. 



Feature-packed variety show 



$4,000 



Questions on love, money and marriage 



Audience Partic. Family 



30 mln. 5/wk 



$650 per 'A hr. 
$1,300 per ' , hr. 



Guests from audience 



Variety 



Family 



60 mln. l/wk 



$7,500 V/i) 



Major Bowes graduates 



Family 



68 min. l/wk 



$6,250 (I) 
$3,500 C/ 2 ) 



Big, zippy kid program featuring kid games 



Variety 



Family 



30 mln. 3 wk 



$2,800 (I) 



Robin Chandler Introduces familiar cover girls 



5 min, 2 wk 



$3,925 (2) 



Late news summary 



[Continued on next page) 



Xvailahic nettv 


ork pat 


'kaae programs 


(TV) 












I Continued from previous page) 


TITLE 


TYPE 


APPEAL 


NET 


TIME 






TESTED 


EXPLANATION 


GARRY MOORE SHOW 


Variety 


Family 




CBS 


15 min. 


5/wk 


$8,375 
$1,875 


(5) 
(1) 


yes 


Daytime; V'4 hr on full hour show open 


AL MORGAN SHOW 


Musical 


Family 




DuM 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$4,152 




yes 


Unique piano styling, vocalists, guests 


MR. OMM 


Drama 


Family 




NBC 


30 min. 


i wk 


$13,000 




yes 


Charles Korvin in dramatic vignettes 


MR. WIZARD 


Science 


Family 




NBC 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$3,000 




yes 


Interesting explanation of basic science 


MY TRUE STORY 


Drama 


Women 




ABC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$7,500 




yes 


In cooperation with True Story Magazine 


NATURE OF THINGS 


Science 


Family 




NBC 


15 min. 


l/wk 


$1,206 




yes 


Dr. Roy Marshall explains basic science 


NBC OPERA 


Opera 


Family 




NBC 


1 hr. 1 


/wk 


open 




yes 


Seasonal 


NEWS STRIP 


News 


Family 




CBS 


15 min. 


5/wk 


$5,625 
$1,125 


(5) 
(1) 


yes 


Straight news show 


NEWS STRIP 


News 


Family 




CBS 


5 min. 


5/wk 


$3,590 


(5) 


yes 


Only in conjunction with Steve Allen Show at noon 


NEWS STRIP 


News 


Family 




CBS 


15 min. 


5/wk 


$6,750 
$1,500 


(5) 
(1) 


yes 


Mid-day news strip 


NOT FOR PUBLICATION 


Drama 


Family 




DuM 


15 min. 


2/wk 


$1,412 




yes 


Short short story involving reporter 


PANHANDLE PETE 


Drama 


Children 




NBC 


15 min. 


2/wk 


$1,350 


for 2 


yes 


Children's stories of Wild West 


Q E D 


(Jul/ 


Adult 




ABC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$4,100 




yes 


Pane! of amateur sleuths 


REMEMBER THIS DATE 




Quiz 


Family 




NBC 


30 min, 


2/wk 


$1,800 
$3,500 


0/4) 
(■/*) 


yes 


Quiz about historical dates 


BUCK ROGERS 




Drama 


Juvenile 




ABC 


30 min, 


l/wk 


$7,500 




yes 


Interplanetary science fiction series 


MRS. ROOSEVELT MEETS 


PUBLIC 


Forum 


Family 




NBC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$5,440 




yes 


Mrs. R. and outstanding guests 


DAMON RUNYON S BROADWAY 


Comedy 


Family 




NBC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


open 




yes 


Filmed adventures of immortal characters 


SATURDAY NIGHT WRESTLING 


Sports 


Family 




DuM 


3 hrs. 


l/wk 


$3,287 




yes 


Wrestling from Chicago: Jack Brickhouse, anncr. 


SHADOW OF THE CLOAK 




Drama 


Family 




DuM 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$3,911 




yes 


Helmut Dantine as counter-espionage agent 


SHOWTIME USA 


Drama-Variety 


Adult 




ABC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$17,000 




yes 


Variety acts and drama presented by ANTA 


SINCERELY. KATY RANDALL 


Serial 


Family 




NBC 


15 min. 


5/wk 


$1,700 




yes 


Daytime serial 


SING IT AGAIN 


Quiz 


Family 




CBS 


15 min. 


l/wk 


$7,050 




yes 


Famous musical quiz 


KATE SMITH REVUE 


Variety 


Family 




NBC 


60 min. 


l/wk 


$52,000 
$26,000 


('/*) 


yes 


Kate and big time guests and variety acts 


SONGS FOR SALE 


Music 


Family 




CBS 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$12,025 




yes 


Steve Allen and amateur songwriters 


STAGE ENTRANCE 


Interview 


Family 




DuM 


15 min. 


l/wk 


$900 




yes 


Earl Wilson takes you backstage 


SURE AS FATE 


Drama 


Family 




CBS 


60 min. 


l/wk 


$17,350 




yes 


Expert production has won high critical acclaim 


GLORIA SWANSON SHOW 


Variety 


Family 




ABC 


60 min. 


l/wk 


$2,500 


per V* hr. 


yes 


Entertainment, news & fashion 


THEY STAND ACCUSED 


Drama 


Family 




DuM 


60 min. 


l/wk 


$4,014 




yes 


Authentically reproduced courtroom dramas 


TIME FOR ERNIE 


Variety 


Family 




NBC 


15 min, 


5/wk 


$550 




yes 


Comedian Ernie Kovacs with music and songs 


TODAYS WOMAN 


News 


Female 




NBC 


30 min. 


5/wk 


open 




no 


Nows of and for women and 10 min. drama 


RUDY VALLEE SHOW 


Variety 


Family 




NBC 


66 min. 


. wk 


$2,000 


per Va hr. 




Rudy as emcee of variety show 


VANITY FAIR 


Variety 


Family 




CBS 


30 min. 
45 min. 


2/wk 
3/wk 


$2,344.67 partic. 
split net 


yes Dorothy Doan and Robin Chandler alternate as M.C. 


WASHINGTON REPORT 


Discussion 


Family 




DuM 


15 min. 


2 wk 


$622 




yes 


Tris Coffin moderates panel discussion 


WATCH THE WORLD 


Educat. 


Children 




NBC 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$5,855 




yes 


Fiins of educat onal and nesw interest 


WE TAKE YOUR WORD 


Panel 


Family 




CBS 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$5,650 




yes 


Amusing and educational tracing of word derivatives 


WHAT IN THE WORLD 


Panel 






CBS 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$2,850 


(1) 


yes 


Leading authorities discuss various topics 



























Situation corned) shows, which have 
proved \<t\ successful on a cost-per- 
thousand l>a-i- and arc somewhat eas- 
ier to produce than the Berle-type TV 
show, will be on the upbeat. CBS-TV, 
for instance, is planning to air situa- 
tion coniedie> on il- network that are 
T\ \eiMoii- of radio favorites includ- 
ing \l\ Friend Irmn. M v Favorite Hus- 
band, and Corliss In ha . 

Mysterj shows are beginning to ta- 
per ofT in number, although the) will 
be back this fall as a strong program 
ing element. There will be more spon- 
sored one-shots lliis fall, like Times 
sponsorship of the Kefauver hearings 
on VBC-TV, and seasonal one-shots, 



like Frigidaire's fane\ Boh Hope 
shows. 

Sports will play about the same role 
in network TV as last season, although 
their position is being threatened some- 
what by collegiate bans and opposition 
ol sports promoters to telecasts because 
of alleged box-office effects; also thea- 
tre TV ma\ sign up mam major -polls 
events exclusively for theatrical show- 
ing. 

Broadl) speaking, network TV shows 
llii- fall will be tending more toward 
the "entertainment" l\pe. and aw.i\ 

from artistic ventures on one hand and 
the "nuts-and-bolts" type show (exam- 
ple: a cooking program) on the other. 



TALENT: You can watch for a real 
"star system" to start this fall in TV 
network programing (as well as in TV 
films I. Networks and producers have 
signed big-name talent in the past, of 
course, but usually for a specific pro- 
gram built around the star. Now, in 
addition to this, a definite trend is 
growing at networks to sign high- 
bracketed talent to a general contract 
la la Hollywood S major studios), and 
then use their services for a whole list 
ol shows within the network's program 
structure. The recent pacting of Mary 
Sine lair to a contract of this sort by 
CBS. and the resultant publicity build- 
up, is a good example. 



154 



SPONSOR 



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155 



This type of talent operation is ex- 
pected to grow, as new TV faces and 
talents are turned up, to include more 
television writers, directors, producers 
en a general contract basis. When the 
situation becomes really competitive, 
as it is on the West Coast, there may 
even be a group of network "TV talent 
scouts" to scan the talent possibilities 
in all phases of entertainment. 

People signed under this system will 
either be assigned to various existing 
shows, or if they warrant it, will be 
used as the keystone of a new show se- 
ries — or both. 

CREATIVE ACTIVITY: The pres- 
ent balance of creative program plan- 
ning and follow-through will remain 
about the same this fall as last fall, al- 
I hough there will be some interesting 
backstage struggles for control. Net- 
works are determined to remain a big 
factor in TV program creation (they 
lost much ground in radio, have only 
recently gained some of it back ) . 
Equally determined to become bigger, 
as TV grows more important as a tal- 
ent outlet, are important package pro- 
ducers and agencies with big TV cli- 
ents. A good general guide will be to 
watch networks, agencies, and package 
producers, noting where most new cre- 
ative talent is being hired and new 
shows packaged. The balance may then 
be swinging in that direction. 



Q. What special programing 
trends will there be in daytime 
network television? 

A. ^ ou'll see a definite swing this fall 
to more "light" shows in the daytime. 
These will be personality showcases, 
along the lines of the Kate Smith Show 
on NBC-TV, and probably sponsored 
in segments by several advertisers. 
rather than just one. (Example: the 
new ABC-TV show starring Don A me- 
dic. I Their function will be to enter- 
tain, rather than instruct. In fact, a 
program v. p. at one leading network 
lias predicted the eventual "disappear- 
ance of the "household liinls type o\ 
network TV shows in a year or so. 

\l the same time, there will be much 
more attention paid to daytime dra- 
matic shows ol a serial nature. This 
type, long a mainstay of daytime ra- 
dio, is beginning to come into its own 
on the visual air. CBS-TV will have 
its P&G soaper, First Hundred Years, 
this fall in the 2:30 to 2:45 p.m. slot; 
plans for more shows ol this t\ pe are 

in the works. 



NBC-TV will have Miss Susan, for 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet. in a 3:00 to 
3:15 p.m. period. Neither ABC-TV 
nor DuMont has any formalized plans 
for shows of this type, but interest in 
them is high. Lever Bros, is said to be 
perfecting film versions of some of its 
serial dramas now running in daytime 
radio, and Whitehall Pharmacal is re- 
ported shopping for a TV serial for 
fall network use. 

Watch, too, for some network test- 
ing of daytime TV block programing. 
This is relatively unexplored territory, 
but if tests show that building a series 
of similar-appeal daytime TV shows 
into a block is successful, the daytime 
TV structure may take on many of the 
same aspects of daytime radio. 

Q. Why do viewers watch daytime 
TV? 

A. According to a recent study made 
by Advertest Research in the New 
York area, 58.3'/ of the respondents 
listed "entertaining" as the reason why 
they watched daytime video. About 
20% indicated that it was "relaxing," 
and only 12.6/< included "interesting" 
( i.e., gave useful information I . 

Q. What special programing 
trends will there be in nighttime 
network television? 

A. Unlike daytime TV. which will see 
a real development this fall, there are 
few new special trends expected for 
nighttime network TV. All of the big, 
successful nighttime TV shows should 
be back this fall. Some of them may 
be revamped a bit to make them more 
"entertaining." A few of the mystery 
shows, like Suspense, are planning to 
break away from the fixed routine of 
"private eye" stories, whodunits or 
horror, and are going in more for doc- 
umentary exposes I communism, nar- 
cotics, gambling, etc.). 

Q. How do average nighttime TV 
ratings stack up against daytime 
ratings? 

A. Comparison rating figures of A. C. 
Nielsen for a typical month shows that 
daytime averages are moving up, 
nighttime averages slightly down. Here 
are the figures: 

AVERAGE NIELSEN RATINGS FOB TV 
PROGRAMS 
Type April, L950 April. 195] 
All Evening Pro- 
grams 29.7 
All Day Programs 
(exeepl kid 
7.-1 9 9 



Q. How do nighttime program 
types stack up again daytime pro- 
gram types in popularity compari- 
sons? 

A. Generally, the show types that are 
most popular at night carry their pop- 
ularity with them to their daytime 
counterparts. This includes variety 
shows, musical-variety types, audience 
participation shows, and dramas. The 
reverse is not true. Daytime "service 
shows," that are instructive (cooking, 
shopping, beauty hint programs) do 
not go over at night. 

Here are the figures from the recent 
Study of Daytime Television No. 3 
made by Advertest Research in New 
York last May: 

RELATIVE POPULARITY OP TV PROGRAM 

TYPES COMPARING DAYTIME AND 

NIGHTTIME* 



Type 


L 


ike tin lit mi* 


Like nighttime 


\ ;i riety shows 




76.5% 


94.0% 


Musicals (variety 




67.2% 


93.0% 


type) 








Quiz programs 




55.0% 


78.8% 


Feature movies 




40.4% 


67.9% 


Cooking programs 




36.4% 


6.0% 


Beauty hints 




35.4% 


27.5% 


Shopping programs 




31.5% 


13.9% 


Serials 




28.5% 


42.1% 


\\ estern Films 




22 -', 


19.5% 


Sewing programs 




15 IV, 


3.3% 


Sonne: Advertest 


Research 





It's interesting to note that the pe- 
riod covered was Monday-through- 
Friday, only adult females were inter- 
viewed with a roster technique, and 
that the viewers responding above (302 
out of a sample of 765 I were consis- 
tent viewers of both daytime and night- 
time TV. The study was made 4-15 
May 1951, in TV homes in the New 
York area. 



Leading' TV network 
clients 



Q. Who will be the leading clients 
on TV networks this fall? 

A. It 's hard to say. Even at this late 
date, several big television clients are 
said to be holding back on their fall 
plans, generally settling budget prob- 
lems. The nearest thing you can get 
to an answer on this is to stud) what 
has been happening, and draw your 
own conclusions. 

During Januar) and February of 
this year, food advertisers spent near- 
l\ $3,500,000 for gross network time. 
Tobacco firms, during this period, 
spent some $2,200,000. and toiletry ad- 
vertisers spent about SI. 730. 000. Au- 
tomotive advertisers spent about $1,- 
650,000 and the makers of household 
equipment, supplies paid $1,184,000. 



156 



SPONSOR 



It's interesting to note that, during 
this time, network TV time sales were 
running five times over what they were 
for the corresponding two-month peri- 
od of 1950. ( Based on NBC, CBS and 
ABC reports to P.I.B. DuMont not re- 
porting.) 

The largest single spender was Proc- 
ter & Gamble. Others follow in ap- 
proximately this order: Reynolds To- 
bacco; General Foods; Ford Motor 
Co.; Anchor-Hocking Glass. 

Now, let's take a quick look back at 
1950. 

For last year, based on Publishers 
Information Bureau figures, these were 
the top TV network advertisers in 
gross TV network time sales on NBC, 
CBS and ABC. 

Leading Network Advertisers — 1950 

1. Ford Motor Co $1,837,057 

2. R. J. Reynolds 1,642,425 

3. P. Lorillard 1,458,125 

4. National Dairy Products 1,356,652 

5. General Poods Corp 1,128,606 

Comparing the two will show you 
why predictions are difficult. Leading 
advertisers changed their positions 
drastically in some cases, but all did 
some moving between their full-year 
standing for 1950 and early 1951. 

What will happen this fall is truly 
anybody's guess. You can look, how- 
ever, for most of last year's big clients 
to be at least very active in TV net- 
work advertising, with the general av- 
erage of money-spending for time go- 
ing up. 

Leading ad agencies in 
network TV 



Q. What agencies are tops in TV 
network business placement? 

A. Again, there is no clear-cut pattern 
for fall. A sponsor estimate of last 
year's agency standings, based on 
P.I.B. figures, shows this approximate 
order, with estimated gross TV billings 
placed by the agency: 

Leading Ad Agencies in .Vet TV — 1950 

1. J. Walter Thompson $4,000,000 

2. Youn? & Rubicam 3,000,000 

3. William Esty 1,886,000 

4. McCann-Erickson 1,823,000 

5. BBDO 1,768,000 

6. Kudner 1,739,500 

7. Wintraub 1,369,000 

8. Maxon 1,303,000 

9. Lennen & Mitchell 1,275,500 

10. Kenyon & Eckhardt 1,246.000 

Since the TV clients of the above 
agencies are expected to be back this 
fall I although with some expenditure 
shifting within agencies I . the rank or- 
der of agencies in TV network business 
placement should be roughly similar to 
these ten. 



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16 JULY 1951 



157 



\ 



Color television 



Q. Should an advertiser get into 
color TV now in order to gain ex- 
perience and good time franchises? 

A. So far as experience goes, the 
knowledge gained from working with 
color film announcements (which can 
be televised in black and white, and 
can be used in theaters I is excellent 
background for any potential color ad- 
\ritiser. But since there won't be any 
regular network color this fall during 
choice evening hours you won't be able 
to stake out a franchise for some po- 
tentialK valuable time slot. 

Q. How can advertisers "hedge" 
against the day when there will be 
color TV on a large scale? 

A. For an additional 30-40' V. accord- 
ing to a recent sponsor checkup on 
film producers (such as Archer Pro- 
ductions. Hal Roach, Apex, etc.), you 
can have your film commercials, or 
even TV film programs, produced in 
color film. Many of the basic lessons 
of visual air color presentation can be 
learned this way. The resulting films 
can be used in black and white, and 
can then be used later when color gets 
an audience. Some advertisers, like 
P&G with its Red Skelton Show, are 
reported making plans to shoot their 
film shows in color. Independent pro- 
ducers, like Gene Autry, are already 
rolling color film in anticipation of 
widespread color TV, and using the 
films on black and white TV. Remem- 
ber, color film can be shown on any 
system of colorcasting, CBS or any 
other which might come out of the 
laboratory . 



Q. When will color TV start roll- 
ing in earnest? 

A. 'i <>u II find that the pattern of 
growth will shape up something like 
this. By this fall, CBS will be feed inn 
some 20 hours of color TV programs 
each week. (This compares to CBS's 
90 hours weekly of black and white 
I hi- fall, and the 3S0 hours or more 
weekl) on all four TV webs.) This 
will be about all CBS color TV staffs 
can turn out without disturbing nor- 
mal black and while schedules. Mean- 
while. CBS will be doing a mammoth 
job ol publicity and promotion on its 
color TV, to (1) make the public col- 
or-conscious, and create a demand for 



sets and more programs, and (2 1 to 
persuade all the leading set manufac- 
turers to turn out sets capable of pick- 
ing up CBS's color. If the publicity 
drive sets the imagination of the public 
afire, you may see quicker growth for 
color than any one now predicts. 



Q. How soon will new color con- 
verters and or sets be on the mar- 
ket? 

A. A sponsor checkup on leading set 
manufacturers shows that a dozen or 
so I CBS-Columbia. Arvin, Stewart- 
Warner, Tele-Tone, Celomat. Muntz, 
Monarch-Saphin, Color-Video Inc., 
and a few others) will be making con- 
verters or sets. But none of them are 
industry giants. RCA, Emerson, Ad- 
miral, Motorola and others wont re- 
tool until the public demand is really 
strong. Set deliveries will probably 
start between September and Decem- 
ber of this year, by industry estimates. 
Mass production is not expected to 
come for at least two or three years. 



Q. What is advertiser and agency 
reaction to color? 

A. The initial reaction seems to be 
enthusiastic, but most agencies are 
warning their clients to proceed with 
caution, since the limited circulation 
of color TV this fall still marks it as a 
semi-experimental ad medium. Nearly 
two dozen advertisers have been airing 
participations and announcements on 
CBS-TV color network and affiliated 
stations, but budgetwise it doesn't add 
up to much. 



Coast-to-coast video 



Q. When will live coast-to-coast 
television start? 

A. Not even officials of the American 
Telephone & Telegraph Company, 
which installs the nation's TV cable.-, 
are sure. Television's "Golden Spike 
won't be driven, by all estimate-, be- 
fore the end of this year, perhaps nol 
before next spring. Switchboards, TV 
equipment and relay installations are 
the big stumbling blocks. 



Q. What will coast-to-coast TV 
mean to sponsors? 

A. There will he two major effects of 

an East-W e-i TV hookup: 



1. Kinescopes — With no live link 
between East and West Coast TV sta- 
tions this fall. TV sponsors will be 
shipping kinescopes of their programs 
to the West Coast as the only alterna- 
tive. In many ways, this is a stop-gap 
measure. A cable connection means 
the end to much of this problem, and 
will assure sponsors of first-rate live 
transmission of their shows and prob- 
ably higher ratings — when shows are 
in the proper time slot for simultane- 
ous peak viewing on both coasts. It 
won't make the situation on availabili- 
ties much easier until there are more 
TV stations on the West Coast. 

2. West Coast Programs — The re- 
verse of East-to-West programing will 
start emerging. Hollywood's talent 
pool, so far as Hollywood-originated 
TV shows is concerned, has barely 
been touched. With the completion of 
the trans-continental cable, watch for 
a strong upsurge in live shows bearing 
the "produced-in-Hollywood" tag. 
More sponsors will start using Holly- 
wood talent on their shows, since it 
will probably cost them less, being 
right next door to TV studios and 
eliminating the need of an expensive 
trek East. Look for more TV equiva- 
lents of programs like Lux Radio The- 
atre. 



Kinescopes 



Q. What about the quality of 
kinescope recordings? 

A. All the networks report a decided 
improvement in the quality of kines. 
One network film director claims a 
10(1', increase in qualitj during the 
past year, due to special film emulsions 
and improved processing methods. He 
expects the improvement to continue. 

Q. How much does it cost a spon- 
sor to have kinescope recordings 
made? 

A. The number of kinescopes made 
tor showing on network stations \ar\ 
with the advertiser's contract. Some 
arrangements between advertisers and 
network- provide for one kinescope for 
e\er\ two stations on the kine schedule 
— with "bicycling" of each print to 
two stations. Other arrangements call 
for one print for each station, and so 
on. 

If an advertiser wants a kine of his 
-how for private use — as an air cheek 



158 



SPONSOR 



or audition, for example — the charges 
run as follows: 



Recording charge 
Cost per print 



ABC CBS DuM NBC 

$150 $250 $270 $285 

150 70 75 65 



Q. Are there any new develop- 
ments planned for recording TV 
shows? 

A. Yes. A joint RCA-NBC project has 
been underway for several months, will 
get its first engineering test about 30 
July. It's an arrangement wherebv 
movie cameras are hooked up to the 
television cameras so as to capture the 
action on film at the same time as it's 
telecast. This film is then edited into 
a single, integrated record of the pro- 
gram. Having been made directly, the 
resulting film is much clearer than 
kinescopes which are taken off a TV 
tube. 

If the RCA-NBC technique works it 
will be licensed for general use, ac- 
cording to a network spokesman. Cost 
may be higher, at first, than kines; but 
the improved quality will make these 
recordings much more effective. 

Q. What's the trend in the amount 
of kinescope recording being done 
by the television networks? 

A. One major net estimates that the 
amount of film earmarked for kines 
has about doubled in the past year. 
To give some idea of what a big oper- 
ation kinescoping has become: NBC 
kinescopes an average of 48 hours of 
programing per week, CBS ships out 
an average of 1,200 reels of film week- 
ly. One program has 40 kines made 
up for each performance. 

Even when the cable reaches the 
West Coast, demand for kines will re- 
main substantial. Network spokesmen 
point out that stations now on the ca- 
ble use kinescopes because it allows 
them to schedule the network programs 
at a time other than the original live 
telecast. 



"Alternate week" 
programs 



Q. What is the "alternate week" 
TV program theory, and when is 
it used? 

A. As the title implies, these are pro- 
grams which appear every-other-wesk 
on a regular schedule. Usually, they 
are two evenly-matched shows (pre- 



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At home in any kitchen, Jean Phair com- 
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16 JULY 1951 



159 



sented one per week, which alternate 
as a tandem I . 

The reason for using such a pro- 
graming approach is equally simple. 
With TV time and talent costs con- 
stantly rising, putting on a show every- 
other-week costs less, gives the talent 
a "breather," and allows more time for 
finished production. 

Two recent examples of "alternate 
week" shows: Robert Montgomery 
Presents and Somerset Maugham The- 
atre on NBC-TV, and Starlight Theatre 
and Burns & Allen on CBS-TV. 



Q. Do viewers have difficulty in 
following schedules for these 
shows? 

A. Yes, there is some confusion. Last 
month. Advertest Research conducted 
a survey in 770 TV homes throughout 
the New York area, interviewing male 
and female viewers on this topic. 

Some of the highlight findings: (ll 
Only 42% could name, without help, 
one alternating week program. (2) 
Only 40% know in advance of per- 
formance which alternate of a pair will 
be presented. (3) Only 16'< could 



Ihe 



he producers of transcribed 
musical radio and/or television 
announcements for such leaders 
of American industry as General 
Electric, Pepsi -Cola, Seal test, 
Benrus Watch, Block Drug, 
Mohawk Carpet Mills, St. Joseph 
Aspirin, Blue Coal, Shell Oil and, 
literally, a host of others, are 
ready to go to work for YOU. 



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Schenectady and New York City 



name the program scheduled for the 
evening of the day of questioning. 

Some 37% of viewers miss seeing 
some alternating programs because 
they do not know that they are on. 
However, some 41 % of the respon- 
dents said that they felt they were get- 
ting "better programs" by this method. 



Q. Do viewers seem to prefer 
weekly TV shows over alternating 
wek programs? 

A. Yes. Advertest figures show that 
68% of the sample preferred weekly 
shows. Main reason: the ease of fol- 
lowing programs. 



Q. What effect does the alter- 
nate-week show have on viewing 
patterns? 

A. According to Advertest: "In some 
cases, a large audience is shared by 
buth programs. In others, a joint au- 
dience is small. In some instances, it 
appears that the weaker of a pair of 
alternating programs benefits from the 
fact that it alternates with a more pop- 
ular program. More than one-third of 
all respondents do not watch any pairs 
of programs. However, 64% watch at 
least one pair of alternate week pro- 
grams." 



Q. Does putting a show on an al- 
ternate week basis lower its spon- 
sor identification? 

A. To some extent, yes. But. there is 
a counterbalancing saving in costs. 
The Advertest study shows that the av- 
erage sponsor identification figures for 
the current alternating programs 
ranges from a high of 87% to a low 
of 6%, with an average identification 
for the six pairs of alternating pro- 
grams at 38%. 

S.I. for 12 comparative weekly pro- 
grams ( selected on the basis of time, 
type and relative popularity ) ranged 
from a high of 74' i to a low of 15%, 
with the median running for the 12 
shows around 44' . . 



Q. Is it wise for a sponsor to think 
of putting his show on an alternate 
basis? 

A. Says Advertest: "the alternate 
week television program can be. and in 
many cases already is. a strong audi- 
ence builder and effective advertising 
vehicle." 



160 



SPONSOR 



lOkdti otouioviMe fdt- 



BESIDE 




The Louisville Metropolitan Area ranks 28th 
in America. 

WAVE has a Daytime BMB Audience of 
238,490 families. Its BMB Area has an Ef- 
fective Buying Income of more than one- 
and-a-half hillion dollars* — or 66.4% as 
much as the entire State of Kentucky! 

WAVE-TV was first in Kentucky by more 
than a year ... is now a third-year veteran, 
preferred by the majority of the 90,526 
TV set-owners in and around Louisville. 
WAVE-TV is Channel 5 . . . features out- 
standing local programming as well as NBC, 
ABC and Dumont. 

Ask Free & Peters for the whole WAVE 
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*Sales Management Survey of Buying Power, May 10, 1950 




WAVE* has a Daytime BMB Audience 
of 238,4<>0 families in Kentucky and 
Southern Indiana. Thin area has an 
Effective Buying Income of $1.67 
billion, as against S2.51 billion fur 
the entire State. The Effective Buy- 
ing Income within WAVE*s Daytime 
BMB counties is 151% of the In- 
come in those Kentucky counties in 
which WAVE does NOT have a BMB 
audience 1 

*The WAVE-TV Coverage Area 
contains 256, 100 families. 



LOUI 




FREE Cr PETERS, INC. 

Exclusive National Representatives 



16 JULY 1951 



161 



r 




GET ALL THE FACTS! 
WRITE FOR YOUR COPY 



-.at 



Ch, NortkeAM Ohio.. 




WGAR Cleveland 
50,000 WATTS . . . CBS 

562 




RADIO . . . AMERICA'S GREATEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



D J ibe SPOT -for SPOT RADIO 



* v 'f) \ Represented Nationally by 
itft ~-&~" Edward Petry & Company 



SPONSOR 




Premiums, unions, TV film . . . 

Radio and television are loaded with matters of industry-wide 
interest on which no "Network" or "Spot" label can be 
pinned. In sponsor's Over-all section, advertisers will find 
the latest merchandising trends rubbing shoulders with tips 
on what's doing in the premium and contest field. Wrapping 
up the quickly-moving television picture are four key topics: 
Hollywood's film plans for TV; what non-Hollywood inde- 
pendent producers are up to; how theatre and subscription 
television are doing; how agencies and advertisers are whit- 
tling down the cost of TV film commercials. 

A concise rundown of the latest union activities spotlights 
the jurisdictional squabble between rival technician's unions, 
tells how unions are reacting to the problem of weeding out 
subsersives. 

With radio fighting back against calamity howlers, and 
TV still incompletely charted, research organizations have 
added new services, sharpened up some old ones, sponsor 
gives a detailed outline of just what each research outfit turns 
out — including qualitative firms like Daniel Starch, Horace 
Schwerin, Advertest. 

Index at right gives the exact location of each Over-all 
topic. 



Research 1 H4 

Contests and premiums IK!) 

Film trends 171 

Hollywood and TV 1 72 

Feature film producers 1 74 
Theatre and subscription TV 175 

TV and sports 181 

TV cost cutting 182 

>lail order and P.I. 181 

Merchandising 185 

Unions 185 

TV code 187 



16 JULY 1951 



163 




COST-CUTTING TRICKS (SEE P. 182) SAVE SPONSOR FILM MONEY. ABOVE, SUBWAY ILLUSION IS CREATED FOR ALKA-SELTZER 



6 



Research 



. . . Because we think thai right now W heaties are doing 
an much as anybody to tell America about common 
stocks and the value of owning them. 
. . . Because Wheatics are dramatizing that story — on 
television, on radio, in the press — in a nation-wide 
contest, offering the winners $50,000 worth of common 
stocks as prizes. 

. . . BeeauBe Wheatie. asked our help ill running that 
contest ... in providing investment guidance for the 
prize winners — or anyone else for that matter — with- 
out charge or obligation. 

Of course, we were glad to do anything we could, 
because we've always felt that a lot more people should 
own common stocks and earn a return of 5% or 67' on 
their extra dollars. Then too, dollars invested in com- 
mon stocks are more likely to keep their purchasing 
power than dollars that are simpU set a-idc. for over 
the years, as prices for food, clothing, and other neces- 
sities have gone up, so have the prices of common stocks. 

Apparently General Mills feel, much the same way. 
feels that sprearling nil ownership interest in American 
enterprise is the best possible way to preserve it. 

So if you'd like a chance to win the top prize — 
$25,000 worth of common stock- just ask your grocer 
for an entry blank in the V, heaties contest today. 

And if you'd like to know more about common stocks 
- what they are, how you buy them, why it might he 
good for you to own some — just ask us for a copy of 
our pamphlet "What Everybody Ou/thl to Know . . . 
About Thi, Stork and Hon,! Business 

You'll find it answers vour questions in words anvone 
can understand There's no charge, no obligation. Just 
ask for the "pamphlet on slocks" arid send rennet to 



l>'l 



AD-lt) 



Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fewer & Beane 

70 PINE STREET NEW YORK s. N V 

Telephone WHilrhall 4-1212 

373 Madison Avi. (57th St.) 1407 BnOAOwAY(38thSt ) 
Tel MUrrsy Hill »616l Tel LOngane -t tss( 

N(«»t -44 Broad Si —Tel MArlcl 3-8500 
S;ai»,W in Wesi Park Place— Tel: 4-7355 



Radio-promoted contest offered stocks as prize 



Q. Are there any new trends in 
radio research? 

A.. Yes. With radio out to spotlight 
its claim as number one low-cost me- 
dium, media research outfits have ex- 
panded their radio services. Here are 
some examples of recent additions, as 
well as one which will be starting this 
fall. 

This June C. E. Hooper announced 
release of the first "Area Hooperat- 
ings." A survey commissioned by 
Cleveland's WTAM established the ra- 
tio between "inside" city audience size 
and "outside" area audience size. 
Once established, by a diary study of 
joinc (>(>() "inside" and "outside" lis- 
teners, this ratio was used to project 
regular Cleveland Hooperatings to the 
« ntire primary area of the station. 

Station WTAM. and others reported 
dickering with Hooper for a similar 
survey and service, will thus be able to 
claim credit for a larger share of their 
listeners. Agency timebuyers should he 
on the lookout for an increasing num- 
ber of "Area Hooperatings" from 50,- 
000 wallers, who have the most to L'ain 



from this new rating technique. 

Dr. Sydney Roslows organization. 
The Pulse, has been kept busy with 
special studies of out-of-home radio 
listening. A recent survey in 15 cities 
indicated that 45.5% of the people in 
these areas owned radio-equipped 
autos. Examples: 716,700 auto-radios 
in Chicago. 857.900 in Los Angeles. 
301,600 in Philadelphia. 

Still in the talking stage is the most 
ambitious application so far of Ad- 
vertising Research Bureau. Inc.'s 
lARBl's) unique point-of-sale tests of 
radio versus newspapers. Following 
the lead of Marshall Field and other 
huge department stores. Macy's is 
seriously planning a test. As previ- 
ously reported in sponsor, ARBI tal- 
lies the actual sales resulting from a 
series of ads in a newspaper and a 
series of radio announcements. Money 
spent on printed advertising exactly 
equals that spent on radio. A year of 
such tests by AHB1 throughout the 
U.S. show radio the top salesman in 
over 95' , of the tests. 

Katlox. the low-cost electronic tech- 
nique, which functioned in Philadel- 
phia before closing down last year. 
ma\ he revived. 



164 



SPONSOR 



Q. What about trends in televi- 
sion research? 

A. As the "cable" snakes its way fur- 
ther westward and the advertiser stake 
in TV increases, research services have 
increased to keep pace. For example: 
Videodex has just added a Part Two 
to its national report. This includes 
an audience breakdown for network 
programs, listener reaction to program 
and to commercial on an "excellent." 
"good," "fair" scale. Videodex has 
also been doing audience turnover and 
audience flow studies, as well as prod- 
uct purchase studies, on a special basis. 



Trendex reports that, come fall, it 
will report on more inter-connected TV 
cities than the 20 now covered. Total 
number of cities to be added has not 
been decided on yet, but they will in- 
clude either new western markets just 
added to the cable or some already 
connected and not included in Trendex 
reports. Another projected plus serv- 
ice from Trendex: a quarterly report 
on sponsor-identification for network- 
advertised products. 

American Research Bureau is con- 
sidering addition of Boston and De- 
troit to its list of TV markets. At the 



same time, three cities now reported 
on quarterly may be covered on a 
monthly basis instead, come fall. 

Q. Which research organizations 
give quantitative information 
about radio and television and 
what does the data consist of? 

A. In outline form, here's what eight 
principal firms provide in the way of 
broadcast media research. 

American Research Bureau, National 
Press Building, Washington, D. C. 
la) Monthly TV "City Reports" for 



Four basic research techniques and their weaknesses 



TECHNIQUE 



1. Meter 

Nielsen, Chicago 



SERVICE 



National radio ratings; na- 
tional TV rating* both pro- 

jectable to total radio/TV 
homes in U.S. 



AUDIENCE AND RATINGS 
INFORMATION 



Share, average, total audi- 
ence; "Nielsen Rating" (mea- 
sures audience for six min- 
utes or more of program) ; 
cumulative, minute-by-minute, 
flow of audience 



SAMPLE 



Fixed ; electronic me- 
ters on about 1,500 
radio, 350 TV sets 
(TV sample now be- 
ing enlarged in pro- 
portion to growth of 
TV) ; samples select- 
ed according to so- 
cio-economic relation 
to rest of U.S. 



WEAKNESSES 



Lack of speed ; high 
cost; measures whole 
family listening, rather 
than individual mem- 
bers of family 



2. Phone 
coincidental 

(a) Hooper, New York 



Radio audience for 102 cities; 
TV audience for 25 cities; 
radio/TV comparisons for 64 
cities 



Share of audience; average 
audience 



In radio, random; at 
least 600 phone calls 
per city during show. 
In TV, fixed home 
base; at least 600 
phone calls per city 



(b) Trendex, New York 



(c) Conlan, Kansas 
City 



National radio audience rat- 
ings based on 20 cities in 
which TV penetration equal 
to TV penetration nationally; 
TV ratings in 20 of largest 
interconnected cities 



Average audience; share of 
audience; audience composi- 
tion; sponsor identification 



In radio, random, 
with at least 1,000 
homes in each city 
phoned. In TV, home 
base, 500 homes 
phoned 



Does not sample before 
8:00 a.m. or after 11:00 
p.m. ; restricted to 
phone owners ; does not 
reach rural listenership; 
does not reach all lis- 
tening within home or 
out of home 



Radio and TV audience rat- 
ings in any area upon request 



Share of audience; average 
audience 



Random 



3. Diary 



(a) Videodex, Chicago, 
New York 



(b) American Research 
Kureau, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



(c) Tele-Que, 

Los Angeles 



Quantitative and qualitative 
TV audience ratings represen- 
tative of all TV areas (63 cit- 
ies included in surveys) 



Total audience; audience 
composition ; qualitative reac- 
tions to programs and com- 
mercials; description of so- 
cio-economic characteristics of 
each home 



Tabulation of 9,200 
homes, rotated four 
times a year; diaries 
kept for one week 
of each month 



Radio ratings for Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; TV ratings repre- 
sentative of all TV areas and 
for six individual cities 



Total audience; 
composition 



audience 



Random; new sam- 
ple group each 
month; diaries kept 
one week each month 



Measurement restricted 
to seven days' listening 
per month; presence of 
diary claimed to affect 
listening habits; human 
falterings of memory 
when recording 



Television audience ratings in 
Los Angeles 



Total audience; 
composition 



audience 



Random; new sam- 
ple group each 
month; diaries kept 
one week each month 



4. Aided recall 
interview 

Pulse, New York 



Radio and TV audience rat- 
ings in 18 cities coast to 
coast; radio/TV comparisons 
in 13 cities 



Total audience; share of au- 
dience; audience composition 



Modified nrea; per- 
sonal inter\iews in 
which respondent is 
asked to recall hi* 
listening during a 
span of four or five 
hours 



Human faltering of 
memory; claimed ten- 
dency of respondent to 
exaggerate listening ac- 
cording to how question 
is asked; fails to reach 
listeners in rural areas 



16 JULY 1951 



165 



ma 



Ice the $<mi&uwia ^Pit/ic/iabe 

and get ALL THREE 



OVERAGE 




UDIENCE 



In this tremendous oil and gas 
capital of Northern Louisiana, 
Eastern Texas, and Southern 
Arkansas, only KTBS offers all 
rhree of these plus benefits- (1 
extra merchandising, (2) over 
300,000 Radio families and (3) 
wide coverage where purchasing 
power is higher than average 



KTBS 

SHREVEPORT 



ERCHANDISING 



10,000 

WATTS— DAY 



5,000 WATTS 
NIGHT 



710 

KILOCYCLES 



NBC 



National Representative: Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



IT'S HOTTER 

than you think! 




Miami is hot this Summer — hot 
with sales -- hot with the greatest 
Summer Tourist Trade in its 
history! Thousands more every 
year learn that Miami is a great 
Summer Resort... clear, sunny 
days, blue skies, cool breezes 
and reasonable prices. 

Yeah man! Ask The Boiling 
Company about the Miami 
Market in the Summertime. Ask 
'em too, to tell you why WIOD 
keeps cash registers hotter 
than hot... all year! 



JAMES M. LeGATE, General Manager 

5,000 WATTS • 610 KC • NBC 



New York. Philadelphia. Chicago. 

(b) Quarterly TV "City Reports" 
for Cleveland. Washington, Baltimore. 

(c) Monthly "National Reports" on 
63 television markets, showing audi- 
ence size for each program, audience 
composition, viewers per set, viewing 
by length of set ownership, radio vs. 
TV activities. 

Samples of about 500 are used for 
city reports; national reports are based 
on 2,200 TV homes. The diary meth- 
od is standard ARB technique. 
Robert S. Conlan & Associates, 1703 
Wyandotte St.. Kansas City. 

I a I Special individual city reports 
by arrangement. Radio ratings col- 
lected by concentrated one-week tele- 
phone coincidental survey. 

(b) Special "Area Surveys" by ar- 
rangement. Radio ratings for a sta- 
tion's complete market area, including 
outside the home city. Omaha and 
Kansas City market areas surveyed to 
date. Widespread telephone coinci- 
dental technique used. 
C. E. Hooper. Inc., 10 E. 40 St., N.Y.C. 

I a I Radio Hooperatings Reports 
for about 100 cities varying in fre- 
quency from once a month to once a 
year, average bimonthly. 

(b) City-by-city ratings of network 
radio programs — published annually 
in the summer. This is a compilation 
of radio audience ratings published 
the previous winter. 

(c) TV-Home Hooperatings, pub- 
lished monthly for New York, Los An- 
geles. Detroit. Other major TV cities 
covered bimonthly on the average. 

id I Monthly, city-by-city rating 
trends on day and night TV. Daytime 
ratings by 15 or 30-minute intervals; 
evening TV rating trends by 30 or 60- 
minute intervals for the following ci- 
ties: Atlanta. Baltimore, Boston, Chi- 
cago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus. 
Dallas-Ft. Worth, Los Angeles, Louis- 
ville. Milwaukee. Minneapolis-St. Paul, 
New York. Philadelphia, Pittsburgh. 
Providence, Salt Lake City. San An- 
tonio. San Diego. San Francisco-Oak- 
land. St. Louis. Syracuse, Toledo. 
Washington. 

(e) Three times yearly, TV Hoop- 
eratings for individual days and eve- 
nings over a three-month period. Sta- 
tion ratings are given by 15-minute in- 
tervals for Monday thru Friday day- 
time telecasts, by half-hours for eve- 
ning programs. Comparable with Ra- 
dio Hooperatings. and published for 
same cities as listed in (d) above, ex- 



166 



SPONSOR 



cept for Los Angeles, New York, and 
San Diego. 

(f) Monthly city-by-city broadcast 
audience report. A single volume with 
two sections; the first in graphic form, 
second in tabular form showing break- 
down of sets-in-use and share-of-audi- 
ence by time of day and by individual 
stations. 

Telephone coincidental method still 
used. 

A. C. Nielsen Company Main office: 
2101 Howard St., Chicago; New York 
office: 500 Fifth Avenue. 

(a) National Radio Index, giving 
radio program ratings, sets-in-use, av- 
erage audience, minute-by-minute au- 
dience, total homes, cumulative audi- 
ence, and other data. Based on Audi- 
meter recordings in 1,500 homes. 

(b) National Television index. 
Same monthly reports for TV as given 
for radio in (a) above. 

(c) Regional & Local Reports. Same 
monthly reports as in (a) and (b) 
above: Pacific Coast (radio), New 
York I radio & TV), Chicago (radio), 
Los Angeles (radio). 

( d) Program-Market Ratings. Show- 
ing the extent to which buying of ra- 
dio and TV-advertised goods is af- 
fected by ownership of radio or televi- 
sion sets. Compiled from Audimeter 
data plus a product check of actual 
buying. Matches program preferences 
against the types of products used by 
people who listen to specific programs. 

(e) Regular reports of the sales and 
movement of food and drug products 
in retail stores. Consists of the Niel- 
sen Food Index and Nielsen Drug 
Index. 
The Pulse, Inc., 15 W. 46th St., N.Y.C. 

I a ) Monthly radio reports for New 
Y ork. 

(b) Bimonthly radio reports for 
Philadelphia, Boston. Chicago, Cin- 
cinnati, Washington, Los Angeles, St. 
Louis, San Francisco, Richmond, Bir- 
mingham, Buffalo, New Orleans, Min- 
nesota-St. Paul, Detroit, Atlanta. 

I c I Monthly TV reports for New 
York. Chicago, Philadelphia. Cincin- 
nati, Los Angeles, Boston, Cleveland. 
Dayton, St. Louis, Columbus, San 
Francisco, Washington. Birmingham. 
Buffalo, Detroit, New Orleans, Minne- 
sota-St. Paul, Atlanta. 

(d) TV reports bimonthly for Syra- 
cuse, three times yearly for New Ha- 
ven, four times yearly for Omaha. 

(e) Monthly reports on network 
radio programs in over two markets. 



NORTH CAROLINA 
THE SOUTH'S NO. 
WPTF- 
N0RTH CAROLINA'S NO. 




STATE 



SALESMAN 



North CarolinaRates More Firsts 
In Sales Management Survey 
Than Any Other Southern State. 

More North Carolinians Listen to 
WPTF Than Any Other Station. 



i 





NBC 



AFFILIATE for RALEIGH, DURHAM 50/OOOwATTS 

and Eastern North Carolina 680kc 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE FREE & PETERS, INC. 



WDXB 

CHATTANOOGA, 
TENNESSEE 



The Nation s 

No. 1 
Independent 

(8 A.M. to 12 Noon) 
according to 

HOOPER 

March— April 1951 

represented by 
FORJOE 



YES, I SAID 




THE 2 MAJOR MARKETS 
In Nebraska 

ON 2 HOMETOWN STATIONS 
In Omaha and Lincoln 

AT I COMBINED 
LOW RATE 

Write For Sales Details 

KBON Omaha 
KOLN Lincoln 

Paul R. Fry, Pres. & Cen'l. Mgr. 

World Insurance Bldg., Omaha 
Nat'l Rep.: John E. Pearson Co. 



16 JULY 1951 



167 



You Can Cover the 
Central New York Market 




! CHEMUNG ! TIOGA 



GREENE 
DELAWARE @ Bnse Map BMB /g<f9 



BROOME 



r 



BMB Nighttime Audience Families 

WSYR 214,960 

Station A- 164,720 

Station B 148,340 

Station C~ -76,920 
Station D 68,970 




ACUSE 



570 KC 



WSYR — AM-FM-TV — The Only Complete 
Broadcast Institution in Central New York 



NBC Affiliate • Headley-Reed, National Representatives 



(f) Monthly reports on network TV 
programs carried in over two markets. 
Ratings and sets-in-use are collected 
by aided recall interviews. 
Tele-Que P.O. Box 6934, Los Angeles, 
Calif.; 260 Kearny St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

(a) Monthly TV program ratings 
for Los Angeles and San Francisco. 
Total audience and audience composi- 
tion included. 

(b) Occasional special surveys of 
TV commercials on a popularity basis. 
Trendex, 347 Madison Ave., N.Y.C. 

(a) Monthly radio report on 20 
cities which have a TV penetration 
equal to the national television pene- 
tration. Cities vary occasionally to 
maintain this equivalence. 

(b) Monthly report of evening TV 
show ratings for cities on the inter- 
connected network. 

Special ratings can be gotten for 
radio or TV shows on short notice. 
Telephone coincidental method is used 
to collect data. 
Videodex, 342 Madison Ave., N.Y.C. 

(a) Monthly, individual city reports 
on TV for Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston 
Buffalo, Cincinnati, Dayton, Cleveland 
Columbus, Chicago, Detroit, Dallas 
Los Angeles, Milwaukee, New York 
Philadelphia. Pittsburgh, St. Louis 
Toledo, Washington. Includes sets-in 
use, share-of-audience, rating, viewers 
per-set by 15-minute segments for each 
day of the first week during the month. 
Full coverage, sign-on to sign-off. 

(b) Monthly network TV reports 
for all 63 television markets. Gives 
day of broadcast, whether sponsored 
or sustaining, number of cities, num- 
ber of homes reach, rating, etc. 

(c) Second part of (b) above lists 
time of all net TV programs, audience 
composition, opinion of program, opin- 
ion of commercial on "Excellent, Good. 
Fair" scale. 



Q. Which research organizations 
give qualitative information about 
radio and TV and what does it 
consist of? 

A. Four research outfits look into the 
more involved questions which plague 
radio and television sponsors. In cap- 
sule form, here's what they do. 
Advertest, Research, 133 Albany Street, 
New Brunswick, N. J. 

(a) Monthly reports titled "The 
Television Audience of Today" on a 
subscription basis. Covers "important 



168 



SPONSOR 



television problems of the day" by per- 
sonally interviewing 750 New York 
area televiewers. 

(b) Special qualitative and quanti- 
tative TV studies of programing, ad- 
vertising, commercials, etc. 

(c) Special qualitative and quanti- 
tative radio research studies. 

(d) Special qualitative and quanti- 
tative market research studies. 
Advertising Research Bureau, Inc., 705 
Central Bldg., Seattle, Washington. 

Irregular, by - arrangement studies 
comparing the sales effectiveness of 
radio and newspaper advertising at the 
retail level. Retail store spends equal 
amounts in radio and newspaper to 
sell same item, ARBI finds out which 
medium brought sales that result. 
Schwerin Research Corp., 2 West 46th 
St., N.Y.C. 

(a) Audience tests of radio pro- 
grams and commercials to discover 
"liked" and "disliked" parts, and why. 

(b) Same as (a) above, for tele- 
vision programs and commercials. 

(c) Separate tests of sponsor-iden- 
tification, product-acceptance; and re- 
lated marketing problems. 

(d) Audience tests of films. 
Daniel Starch & Staff, 420 Lexington 
Ave., N.Y.C; 101 E. Ontario St., Chi- 
cago. 

(a) Monthly report on TV commer- 
cials, showing audience reaction, brand 
acceptance. 

(b) Special pre-analyses of TV com- 
mercial storyboards. 

Contests and p remiums 

Q. What is the fall trend in con- 
tests? 

A. Contests have been a heavy favor- 
ite of advertisers lately and ad agency 
experts in the field predict even more 
contests come fall. They point out, 
however, that more contests mean few- 
er responses to each individual one. 
Spotting contests to avoid a crowded 
field is the key to successful returns. 



Q. What is the fall trend in 
premiums? 

A. Premiums have been on the up- 
trend over the past few years. W. P. 
Lillard, president of the Premium Ad- 
vertising Association of America, re- 
ports a 30% increase in such offers 
over the past year-and-a-half. But 
there will not be an increase in next 




CLUB 1300, WFBR's great 
daytime audience show, has 
the highest Hooper of any 
radio show in Baltimore one 
hour or more in length.* 

This is it! The show that does 
everything, that always plays 
to a full house, that has 
broken records year after 
year, that attracts visitors in 
such droves that tickets are 
gone months in advance! This 
is the # 1 radio buy in Balti- 
more — far and away the 
leader in its time bracket— 
or practically any other 
bracket! CLUB 1300 is a must 
in Baltimore! 

Other WFBR-built shows are 
making history, too! Ask 
about Morning in Maryland, 
Shoppin Fun, Melody Ball- 
room, Every Woman's Hour, 
and others! 
*May, 1951, Hooper report. 



FABULOUS 
RESULTS: 

VEGETABLES 

A spot advertiser on CLUB 
1300 tried a coupon Write- 
in offer. Three announce- 
men ts brough 1 9.000 replies ! 

TICKETS 

CLUB 1300's m.c. madeone 
announcement that there 
were a few tickets available 
for Monday broadcasts. 
Three days later, he dug 
out from under requests 
(or 125,000 tickets! 

CANCER DRIVE 

We took CLUB 1300 to a 
local theatre for one broad- 
cast. Ticket holders — (no 
big donations) paid over 
$1600.0,0 to American 
Cancer Society to see the 
regular show! (No big 
names, either!) 

FOOD SHOW 

Biggest crowd in Baltimore 
Food Show history came 
to see one broadcast of 
CLUB 1300. 

. . and others too numerous 
to mention. 




ABC BASIC NETWORK • 5000 WATTS IN BALTIMORE MD. 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



16 JULY 1951 



169 




70c Z>o- 76u 

At KQV, it's a 24-hour-a-day job aggressively 
promoting in the right places for its advertisers. 
Carefully planned promotion — newspaper, dealer 
contests and special theater tie-ins — is one reason 
why our rating and our local and national billing 
are consistently high. Spot revenue-wise, KQV is 
among the top five Mutual stations of the nation. 



PITTSBURGH'S AGGRESSIVE 
RADIO STATION 

Basic Mutual Network • Natl. Reps. WEED & CO. 



A value . . . PLUS 
in "BRUSH CREEK 
FOLLIES" 

with 

HIRAM 
HIGSBY 

on 




KMBC 
KFRM 



PLUS ONE-"Brush Creek Follies" is 
in its fourteenth successful season! 
PLUS TWO— Playing again to a live 
audience from the stage of the huge 
new KMBC studio playhouse! 
PLUS THREE— A great new arrange- 
ment on commercials for advertisers! 
PLUS FOUR — An outstanding new 
promotion and merchandising plan! 
PLUS A DOZEN-Write, wire or 
phone KMBC-KFRM or your nearest 
Free and Peters colonel! 



KMBC 

of Kansas City 

KFRM 

for Rural Kansas 



• • • 6th oldest CBS Affiliate • • • 




WILLA 
MONROE 



"A GREAT BUY", 

SAYS OUR 
COMPETITION! 



The five Memphis stations that split up the Memphis 
white audience will admit that WDIA completely 
dominates in selling the 44% Negro segment ot 
Memphis' 394,000 total population. And. with a 
total BMB county-count ot 489.000 Negroes. WDIA 
thus offers you a truly great market that cannot be 
as effectively sold any other way ! 

Hoopers* prove the listenership, aid the case his- 
tories of such QUALITY advertisers as Camels Ciga- 
rettes. Super Suds. Frostee. Arrld. Lipton Tea, 
Purex and Old Judge Coffee prove results. Write for 
full details. 



HOOPER RADIO AUDIENCE INDEX 
City: Memphis. Tcnn. Months: April-May 1951 



Sets WDIA B 



MF IIAM-BPM 14.5 24.1 25.4 19.9 11.6 9.2 6.7 2.5 



Radio Station WDIA, Memphis, Tenn. 

John E. Pearson Co., Representative 



fall's crop of premium offers. Avail- 
ability of desirable, reasonably-priced 
items for premium use is the limiting 
factor. Practically all premium offers 
are self-liquidating, stimulate bargain- 
hunting by sponsors to keep cost down. 

Q. What is the tally on the num- 
ber of contests and premium of- 
fers run recently? 

A. Here's a breakdown of recent 
contests and offers by networks. All 
except Mutual combine both AM and 
TV. 



ABC 



CBS Mutual 



SBC 



January 


1 


9 


16 


17 


February 


8 


10 


22 


10 


March 


6 


10 


20 


6 


April 


8 


8 


24 


4 


May 


10 


8 


25 


8 



Q. What kind of advertiser is us- 
ing contests and premiums? 

A. Although users of contests and 
premiums run the gamut of manufac- 
turers, most come from the small-item, 
big turn-over category. For example, 
65% of the 10,000 firms who promot- 
ed premium offers last year were food 
producers and processors. 

Just a few examples of the kinds of 
firms who used these promotion gim- 
micks recently: Beltone, Colgate-Palm- 
olive-Peet, Noxzema. General Foods, 
General Mills, Hudson Paper Napkins, 
Lever Bros., Lipton Tea, Procter & 
Gamble, Philip Morris, Longines- 
Wittnauer, Chesebrough Manufactur- 
ing, Pillsbury Mills, Sterling Drug. 



Q. Is there any difference in the 
handling of contests and premiums 
on TV and on radio? 

A. Yes. TV's demonstrating power 
permits the sponsor to show off his 
premium or picture the prizes in his 
contest. Agencymen who've tried 
premium offers on both AM and TV 
report that TV brings in "satisfactory" 
returns, but not necessarily spectacu- 
lar ones, as compared with radio. Pic- 
turing a premium or prize can con- 
ceivably boomerang, too. if goods are 
not up to expectations. Most premiums 
present no demonstration problem on 
TV, others are handled better on ra- 
dio. Example: needle threader, which 
"gets lost between the lines" of a TV 
receiver. 



Q. What are the outstanding con- 
tests and premium offers made re- 
cently? 



170 



SPONSOR 



A. One contest, notable for its pub- 
licity and public relations by-products, 
is the link-up between General Mills 
and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & 
Beane. The food firm and stock brok- 
er outfits joined to put on an "I like 
Wheaties because . . ." contest, with 
$25,000 in common stocks as first 
prize. Total outlay for prizes: $50,000. 
Winner can use expert advice of Mer- 
rill Lynch to buy his portfolio. Unique 
offer promotes Wheaties — and the idea 
that "just plain folks" can buy stock 
in U. S. business. 

Another very successful promotion, 
a recent offer by the Hudson Pulp & 
Paper Company, cost the company 
about $250,000. Hudson uses both ra- 
dio and TV, wanted to get some meas- 
ure of their respective sales pull; the 
napkin-making firm was also after a 
broad sample of customers and poten- 
tial customers for later market surveys. 

The quarter-of-a-million dollar tab 
was run up by filling some 500,000 re- 
quests for free napkins. Offer was 
made over WGN, Chicago; WBZ, Bos- 
ton; WBZA, Springfield, Mass.; 
KDKA, Pittsburgh; CKLW, Detroit; 
WFIL, Philadelphia; and WOR, New 
York. John B. Gambling, WOR morn- 
ing man, pulled a remarkable 181,000 
inquiries. Television coverage came 
from 30 CBS-TV outlets carrying Hud- 
son's Bride & Groom show. Company 
is reportedly pleased, may repeat the 
offer despite the considerable expense 
— which they figure has already come 
back in form of increased sales and 
valuable publicity. 



TV f il m trends 

Q. What is the trend in use of 
film for programing on TV? 

A. A recent survey by Paul White, 
vice president of the National Tele- 
vision Film Council, indicates that an 
average of 17 to 19 hours of film per 
week is used on the average TV sta- 
tion. This amounts to about 20% of 
the total time available on stations with 
12-hour-a-day operations. White pre- 
dicts that by December 1951 film usage 
will have risen to 30%. He points out 
that at least two big network TV shows 
will return in the fall on film, instead 
of live as before. 



Q. Are there any significant 
trends in TV film commercials? 





[ 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



42.2 



37.2 




-in 30 of 40 

Quarter Hour 
Daytime Periods 

Monday thru Friday 

2nd in 8 Periods 



Look at the Share-of-Audience 
You Get on WFBL \ 



20.4 



20.6 



18.0 



14.8 



12.7 



13.6 



10.2 



WFBL 



Station B 



Station C 



Station D 



Station E 



All ratings from Hooper Winter-Spring 
Report — December, 1950 thru April, 1951 



Compare and you'll buy . . . 




WFBL 



• Syracuse, N. Y. 




FREE & PETERS, INC. Exc/uJiVe Notional Reprejenfof.'vej BASIC 



16 JULY 1951 



171 




To an Account Executive 

with radio 
budget 
problems 

anJan J * 



ulcer 



Perhaps you have never smelled the fragrance 

of new-mown hay tedding on rolling acres, or watched 

the clean steel of a plow slipping through the 

fertile black soil of Iowa. Antonin Dvorak 

made powerful music for the New World Symphony 

from such ingredients. We, more interested in 

powerful buying power, prefer to hear the music 

made by the seasonal finale — the clunk of hard 

ears of corn hitting a backboard - - the hiss of a 

thresher spewing kernels of wheat for tomorrow's 

bread. Iowa's 34.8 million acres of tillable soil 

produce, among an abundance of other things. 

10% of the nations food supply and contribute to 

the high per capita wealth of Iowans, currently 

61% above the national average. 

The half-acre in the country to which you repair 

week-ends — or aspire to — is about l/320th the 

size of an average Iowa farm. If you feel that 

you ought to have a gold mine in the back yard just 

to meet your country living costs, compare your 

situation with an Iowan's. Iowa's rockless soil 

produces more wealth each year than all the gold 

mines in the world. 

Before you dash mil for a harried lunch of soft- 
boiled eggs and a glass of milk (while many an Iowan 
is tuning his radio to WMT and sitting down — 
at home — to a leisurely noon-day meal of 
sizzling steak, golden roasting corn dripping with 
freshly churned butter, tender garden peas, straw- 
berries and cream . . .) please consider this: 

A Class C station break on WMT has a potential 

audience (within the 2.5 mv contour) of more 

than 1.1 million people — and it budgets at $12 

(260-time rate). It's a market worth reaching — and 

in Eastern Iowa WMT reaches. 

Please ash the katz man for additional data. 



5000 WATTS 



Day & Night 



600 KC 



BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 




A. Advertisers are balancing increased 
production costs with cost-cutting 
methods to keep the price of TV film 
commercials about the same, on the 
average, as they have been. Specifical- 
ly, the cost of film stock has taken two 
price jumps in the past 18 months. 
While labor has remained relatively 
stable, other production costs have ris- 
en as well. 

To balance the upward spiral, agen- 
cies and sponsors are looking more 
closely at fancy camera work and am- 
bitious settings. Several large agen- 
cies report an increasing number of 
straight, demonstration-type commer- 
cials — live-action, without stop-motion 
or animation. As in the past, stop-mo- 
tion is the most expensive technique, 
animation next. 

Another trend is the inevitable thin- 
ning out which is taking place among 
the ranks of TV commercial film pro- 
ducers. The smaller operators are find- 
ing it tough to get a steady enough 
flow of work to keep going. As one 
producer explained it: "If we could 
just get an order a week, even a small 
one, we could keep going. But the 
feast and famine type of operation is 
what puts us smaller fellows out of 
business." 

Result of this contraction in film 
outfits will not be felt for a while yet 
— possibly a year — but when it is. look 
for higher prices. Many firms have 
been working almost for nothing, just 
to build a reputation: they've got to 
make up for some of the lean years. 
Competition will keep quality up and 
prices moderate, however. An expand- 
ing Hollywood interest in TV film 
commercials will ensure that. Look for 
more "Made in Hollywood" labels on 
film commercials when the mechanics 
of East Coast-West Coast liaison are 
straightened out. 



Hollywood and TV 



Q. What can sponsors expect from 
Hollywood in the way of films for 
TV this fall? 

A. Hollywood, after giving TV cold 
looks for years, is beginning to realize 
that its future may well depend upon 
a good working relationship with tele- 
vision. ^ ou'll find more and more film 
producers this fall, including some of 
the major studios as well as the inde- 
pendents, opening their film vaults and 
releasing films made only a few years 



172 



SPONSOR 



ago. Others will be making more films 
on a "to-order" basis for leading TV 
clients and networks. Two recent ex- 
amples of this trend: Robert L. Lip- 
pert, one of the film capitals ace in- 
dependent producers, has re-scored (in 
a special deal with the American Fed- 
eration of Musicians) some 20 of his 
products, and has been selling them to 
TV stations as a package, with another 
package of 20 films expected for the 
fall. Columbia Pictures subsidiary, 
Screen Gems, has shot two trial-run 
half-hour versions on film of du Pout's 
Cavalcade of America, at a reported 
cost of $22,500 each, using the exten- 
sive Columbia studios in Hollywood. 

Q. Will the ABC-United Para- 
mount deal mean that more Hol- 
lywood films will be available for 
TV? 

A. United Paramount Theatres does 
not make films. But since UPT is the 
largest movie exhibitor in the country, 
its merger with ABC has caused a tre- 
mendous amount of talk in Hollywood. 
This alone may be enough to prod 
some of the major studios, like Metro 
and Warners, who are anti-TV, into 
becoming more active in video, or into 
releasing some of their old films to tel- 
evision. Also, since UPT is an old 
hand at building expensive stage shows 
with name stars, it may mean that 
more name talent may flock this fall 
to TV, and perhaps to TV films. 

Q. What are the main advantages 
Hollywood has in making TV pro- 
gram films? 

A. With Hollywood, film-making is an 
established business. The best techni- 
cal brains, and the best-known talent, 
are there. The weather is usually ex- 
cellent for outdoor location shots. Lab- 
oratory work, for films and recording, 
is the world's finest, and can often be 
turned out faster than similar work in 
the East. With an increasing list of 
big studios and independent produc- 
ers engaged in TV film activities of all 
sorts, the Hollywood firms are building 
a big backlog of experience. 

Q. What are the disadvantages 
facing Hollywood film men? 

A. Hollywood's "sponsor," until TV 
came along, was the box-office. All 
film men were concerned with was 
turning out pictures that would appeal 
to the public. Now, Hollywood is hav- 





1 







of the 

"St Louis 

^a/lpoom" 

sold these 
advertisers 





I :-: tea 



The "St. Louis Ballroom" /'///j is promotion! Bigger, better than 
ever! 24 sheets, exterior bus and streetcar cards, interior bus and 
streetcar announcements on Transit Radio, newspaper display 
ads, special mail promotions and personal appearances, pro- 
motion announcements on KXOK are scoring a wide plus for 
"St. Louis Ballroom" advertisers. Get details from your 
John Blair man or from KXOK today. 



ABC STATION 

, 2 ,l i DEIMAR- CHESTNUT 370U 




63okc.50oo WATTS •FULL TIME 



Represented by John Blair & Co. 



16 JULY 1951 



173 



CLEVELAND'S Cfa£ STATION • WJ W • CLEVEUMD'S/^fc^^TSJCNAL' WJW • CLEVELAND'S 0UU 



S ^ 




Chief Says: 

"Chief's local business sure is booming, 
Let Cleveland merchants tell you why: 
Their spot campaigns send sales a-iooming 
Chief Station's shows sure make folks BUY!" 

LOCAL BIZ 
TRIPLED 

Take your tip from local sponsors. They 
know Cleveland— they demand results. 
Since February, local business has 
tripled on WJW —Cleveland's only 
network station with net-calibre day- 
time local programming. 



I 



CLEVELAND'S 



STATION 



5000 W. 

WJW BUILDING 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 




OS 



BY 



BASIC ABC 

CLEVELAND 15, OHIO 
H-R REPRESENTATIVES, 



Inc. 



IN MONTREAL 

it's 




Canada's FIRST station — wise in 
the ways of PROGRAMMING, 
PROMOTION and MERCHAN- 
DISING . . . gives you the cover- 
age and the listenership needed 
to do a real selling job in this 
rich market area. 




CONLON REPORT 
Sept. 1950 

% sets on 24.6%— 
% KCVO • Mosby 5000w— 
AM PM EVE 
67.4 51.0 50.5 

% KXLL • Craney 250w— 
AM PM fvp 
30.0 45.9 



EVE 

45.3 



Ail Others 
AM PM EVE 
2.6 3.1 4.2 

Serving the most people in the 

largest area of Rich Western 

Montana since 1931. 

74e /tit THotfa Statio*u 




U. S, Representative— Weed & Co. 



M00 Wans 250 Watts 

f * Night &. Day Night & Day 

CllifGMM """'"" *"""" 

MONTANA 

THE TREASURE STATE OF THE 48 



ing to learn to work to the specifica- 
tions and purposes of advertising, and 
to work with agencies and clients. This 
is not an easy thing for an industry to 
learn almost overnight. Also, there is 
the problem of distance between New 
York and Hollywood. The bulk of cre- 
ative advertising activity, as well as 
the headquarters of all the leading TV 
networks, is in the East. Doing "Hol- 
lywood shows" in radio means a con- 
stant shuttling of admen back and 
forth between New York and L. A. 



TV feature film firms 



Q. What's the over-all economic 
picture among feature film firms? 

A. Making a series of film calls for a 
hefty bankroll and the bankers are 
justifiably wary of supplying the finan- 
cial backing. Even the recognized top- 
notchers find themselves making intri- 
cate deals to assure adequate financing, 
producer of the Paradise Island and 
Example: the deal Jerry Fairbanks, 
Front Page Detective series, recently 
worked out with big Official Films of 
New York under which Fairbanks will 
boss production and Official will han- 
dle the distribution end. 

Because of the high cost of produc- 
tion and the limited market available 
until the freeze on new TV stations is 
thawed out, many producers are un- 
able to get back production costs on 
first runs of their products. 



Q. Who are some of the leading 
producers and what types of pro- 
grams are they turning out? 

A. A list of successful film producers 
and typical productions might include: 
Apex [Lone Ranger), Bing Crosby 
[Fireside Theater), Flamingo (Super- 
man), Roland Reed (Stu Erwin) , Film- 
tone (Life of Riley) , Flying A Pictures 
(Gene Autry) , Frederic W. Ziv (Cisco 
Kid), Prockter (Big Story), Hal 
Roach (Racket Squad), Bernard Kar- 
len [I'd Like To See . . .), Paramount 
(Wrestling from Hollywood), Consoli- 
dated iBuster Keaton Show), Interna- 
tional Tele-Film [John Kieran's Kalei- 
doscope), and Louis Weiss (Craig 
Kennedy, Criminologist) . 

Two new indications that film for 
TV will become more plentiful are the 
deal between Official Films and Jerry 
Fairbanks. Inc.. and the abortive Par- 



174 



SPONSOR 



amount Pictures-Hal Roach negotia- 
tions. Importance of film as a pro- 
gram source is pointed up by Isaac D. 
Levy's resignation from CBS board of 
directors to devote full time to Offi- 
cial Films, Inc. (of which he's chair- 
man). Official just took over Jerry- 
Fairbanks, Inc., Hollywood-based TV 
film producer. The combine has close 
to a million dollars capital, and it looks 
like an ambitious program of film pack- 
ages for television is getting under way. 
with Fairbanks turning out the films 
(with a bigger budget) and Official 
doing the marketing on a wide scale. 
It looked for a while as though a simi- 
lar deal might go through between Par- 
amount Pictures and Hal Roach Stu- 
dios. Paramount, which owns a piece 
of DuMont, had plans for producing 
film to be used over the DuMont TV 
network. Price of $4,500,000 for 
Roach facilities was rumored to be ac- 
ceptable, but the board of Paramount 
failed to approve the purchase. Latest 
is that NRC, through TV head Pat 
Weaver, has negotiated a deal that 
brings Roach facilities into NBC orbit, 
of Western half-hour films regularly 
scheduled on TV - - Lone Ranger 
(Apex), Cisco Kid (Ziv), Gene Au- 
try (Flying A), and Range Rider (Fly- 
ing A) — are the other four. Dozens of 
other regular TV film packages are be- 
ing sold on long-term contracts by such 
firms as United Artists, Consolidated 
Television Productions, Harry S. Good- 
man Productions and others. 



Theatre and subscriber 
TV 



Q. Will theatre television and 
subscriber TV affect you as an ad- 
vertiser? 

A. Yes, in three ways. First, you'll 
have to buck both systems in buying 
rights for top entertainment — princi- 
pally sports. Theatre television, al- 
ready a thriving, though still small en- 
terprise, may be counted on to get a 
preferential nod from sports promoters 
with box-office jitters. Many promo- 
ters like the theatre arrangement, 
where out-of-town showings don't cut 
into the gate. Subscriber TV still try- 
ing its wings experimentally, could 
quickly build itself into a multi-mil- 
lion dollar business. One system envi- 
sions an initial subscriber list of 100,- 
( Please turn to page 179) 



YOU MIGHT CLEAR 

15' 7- 3 /4"*- 




BUT... 

YOU NEED 

WKZO-WJEF 

AND WKZO-TV 

TO GO OVER THE TOP 

IN WESTERN MICHIGAN! 



WKZO, Kalamazoo, and WJEF, Grand Rapids, have been radio leaders 
in their home cities for so long that time buyers automatically recog- 
nize them as first choices "in town". BMB Study No. 2 proves that 
WKZO-WJEF are an exceptional buy for rural Western Michigan, too. 
Since 1946, WKZO-WJEF have increased their unduplicated Audiences 
by 46.7% in the daytime ... by 52.9% at night! But here's the 
frosting on the cake: WKZO-WJEF not only deliver about 57% more 
listeners than the next-best two-station choice in Kalamazoo and Grand 
Rapids — they also cost 20% less than the next-best combination! 

WKZO-TV, Channel 3, is the official Basic CBS Outlet for Kalamazoo- 
Grand Rapids. It is a multiple-market station, serving five Western 
Michigan and Northern Indiana cities, with a total buying income of 
more than one and a half billion dollars! WKZO-TVs coverage area 
embraces 133,122 sets, making this America's 23rd television mar- 
ket — ahead of such metropolitan cities as Seattle, Memphis or Miami! 

Better get the whole Fetzer story today! Write direct or ask your 
Avery-Knodel representative. 



sfc Cornelius Warmerdam of the San Francisco Olympic Club set this world's record 
on May 23, 1942. 



WKZO-TV 



feci in GRAND RAPIDS tt*> A ,N WESTERN MICHIGAN ^ 1N KALAMAZOO 

Ann vent COUNTY AMD NORTHERN INDIANA and GREATER 

AND KENT COUNTT WESTERN MICHIGAN 

(CBS) 



ALL THREE OWNED AND OPERATED BY 

FETZER BROADCASTING COMPANY 
Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



16 JULY 1951 



175 





What can radio do to sell itself more effectively to 
ail vert isers? 



Douglas Ballin, Jr. 



Advertising Manager 
Whitehall Pharmacal Co. 
New York 




Mr. McAndrews 



The 

picked panel 

answers 
Mr. Ballin 



Organize — or- 
ganize — organ- 
ize! Stop trying 
to carry the 
whole load as in- 
dividuals and 
start sharing the 
hurden as an in- 
dustry. Support 
to the limit 
Broadcast Adver- 
tising Bureau for 
national promotion. Support to the 
limit the state association for regional 
promotion. Support to the limit the 
city or district association for local 
promotion. If there isn't such an as- 
sociation, start one. 

Every dime a broadcaster spends on 
concerted association sales activity, 
every hour he contributes to its work, 
carries double reward. First, his sta- 
tion benefits from the resultant sale of 
radio as a medium. Then his salesmen 
and his promotion staff are freed from 
much of the necessity of selling radio 
and can work on selling a specific sta- 
tion, time, and program. If they need 
ammunition to help sell the medium 
first, the association they support sup- 
plies it. 

In our area, broadcasters who have 
tried organized promotion, like it. Two 
years ago the Southern California 
Broadcasters Association had 34 mem- 
bers. Today it has 58, paying their 
dues, their special campaign assess- 
ments, and their levies of time for gen- 
eral meetings and committee activities 
uncomplainingly. The 250-watters in 



small markets work and pay side by 
side with metropolitan 50,000-watters. 
"Tough" advertisers of the old print- 
ed media school, who wouldn't even 
grant a time salesman an interview, 
have given audiences to sales commit- 
tees representing the entire industry. 
They have been impressed with the 
neutrality of research presentations on 
behalf of radio made up by the Asso- 
ciation, without so much as the name 
of a single station mentioned. They 
have been first puzzled, then gratified 
with the refreshing novelty of competi- 
tive station sales managers cooperating 
instead of attacking, working together 
to help the advertiser first test, then 
use radio profitably. And they have 
bought where they have never bought 
before. 

Other media long ago learned the 
value of joint promotion. It's radio's 
turn. 

Robert J. McAndrews 
Managing Director 
Southern California 

Broadcasters' Association 
H ollyivood 



Radio needs to 
regain confidence 
in itself. From 
order taking to 
selling is going 
JK_ to be a long, hard 

road for most of 
radio to follow. 
It will take some 
good, honest 
pricing, and a lot 
of hard work. 
In the honest thinking department. 




y " 



Mr. Wade 



radio's touch is no longer magic for 
the average advertiser — this touch has 
theoretically gone to television. Few 



radio people actually know how or why 
advertisers and their agencies are us- 
ing radio, even though they have used 
it steadily over many years. Presenta- 
tions of radio time for spot or network 
miss the point by a mile, and advertis- 
ers who do not turn to some other me- 
dia have to work out their own cam- 
paign and then buy it. Radio could 
well turn to its successful advertisers 
and find out why they are still there, 
and what it will require to keep them 
there. 

Honest pricing in radio will be of 
utmost importance in the future. Ra- 
dio must base its rates closer to its 
actual circulation than to its potential 
circulation on a given station. The 
plus audience in radio started to go 
before television entered the picture 
with the greatly increased number of 
stations, but radio did not advertise 
the fact that there are six or seven ra- 
dio stations in a city or area today 
where there were only three or four 
preceding 1945. Industry spokesmen 
who are speaking against rate reduc- 
tions outside of TV areas have ignored 
this factor as though it didn't exist, 
but it does, and the result finds the 
advertiser with less selling power via 
radio than he had before, at the same 
price, and despite the increase in radio 
homes. 

Television, of course, is pretty defi- 
nite in its contribution to radio's circu- 
lation loss, and as far as radio is con- 
cerned, a television home should be 
considered by radio in the same man- 
ner radio considers listening in auto- 
mobiles — a definite plus. To my mind, 
you can no longer count the TV homes 
as radio homes as well. 

If the thinking is right and the pric- 
ing is right, then radio can get down 
lo tlie hard task of setting its house 



176 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Bland 



in order. Radio needs a rate card that 
sticks. Advertisers and their agencies 
don't like deals. Deals are too much 
like quick sand and one never knows 
where the bottom is. It's too easy to 
look at other media where everybody 
keeps on the same basis. As an agen- 
cy, we think we understand radio and 
we still use it successfully for our cli- 
ents. Radio has been making it tough- 
er for us to do that for some time. We 
would welcome a change. 

Jeff Wade 

Partner 

Geoffrey Wade Advertising 

Chicago 



Now, t h a t's a 
good question. 
And the answer 
is very simple. 
All radio has to 
do is to help sell 
more of the ad- 
vertiser's prod- 
ucts. And keep 
on doing it. And 
prove it. That 
answer might 
sound like an over-simplification, and 
the way to accomplish it may be de- 
vious and difficult, but that's what it 
boils down to. 

Other media have had hard times 
in the past. Outdoor posting was cha- 
otic and very messy until it organized 
itself and began to prove its worth to 
advertisers with case histories that 
couldn't be ignored. Newspapers took 
a severe licking when every advertiser 
rushed to radio in the good old days, 
and bounced back to a level higher 
than they ever enjoyed in the past. 

Radio has a merchandising job to 
do, if it wants to restore its position. 
The advertising manager has no con- 
victions about one medium or another 
■ — just so long as it sells his merchan- 
dise in the market. For years, maga- 
zines and newspapers have given 
strong point-of-sale merchandising 
support and steady direct mail sup- 
port to its clients, to insure that ad- 
vertising dollars multiplied into sales 
dollars. Yet radio is only now begin- 
ning to bestir itself in that direction, 
and has much to learn before it 
achieves the experience and success of 
its competition. 

There's nothing wrong with radio 
that good programing won't cure. My 
{Please turn to page 188) 




SPONSORS GET 
"PROMOTION flC&S" 
ON 

WDSU 



* Colorful Truck Posters 
Promote WDSU Programs 
Throughout New Orleans! 




Everyday— Railway Express trucks travel all over New 
Orleans, carrying WDSU's posters that spotlight top 
programs. These posters are seen— by the people who 
do the listening— and who then do the buying. Another 
powerful "Promotion Plus " for our sponsors. 



NO OTHER NEW ORLEANS STATION OFFERS SUCH 
CONTINUOUS "PROMOTION PLUS" TO SPONSORS! 



• Write, Wire 
or Phone Your 
JOHN BLAIR Man! 




16 JULY 1951 



177 



when you 



* appoint a new rep 



* increase your power 



change networks 



tell the 




about it in 



SPONSOR 



* If e mean the advertising world, including timebuyers, account 
executives, radio/TV directors, advertising managers, 
medic, directors, presidents of agencies and sponsor 
firms. SPONSOR is their market place. 




The fuse] magazine of radio/TV 



000 set-owners; at $2.00 per week that 
provides a formidable budget for buy- 
ing rights. 

Second, theatre-viewers and sub- 
scriber-viewers (principally the latter) 
will draw off part of the audience now 
tied up exclusively by commercially 
sponsored television. Partially offset- 
ting this loss in audience is the chance 
that subscriber TV will set off another 
wave of set buying, thereby increasing 
total audience for all programs. 

Third, subscriber television shapes 
up as a possible competitor for broad- 
cast time. Theatre TV operates on 
closed circuit (NBC handled the re- 
cent Louis-Savold bout as an aside to 
its regular network telecasts ) . there- 
fore doesn't infringe on any air-time 
which an advertiser could buy. Sub- 
scriber television, however, must either 
buy time on the established stations or 
build some of their own. Its unlikely 
that any of the subscriber systems 
would build a station just to put on 
10 hours of entertainment a week, and 
the freeze situation makes station- 
building even more unlikely. Conclu- 
sion: subscriber TV will be in there 
scrambling for availabilities. 



Q. How soon will theatre TV be- 
gin to compete for entertainment 
and audience? 

A. It's already begun. Both the Louis- 
Savold fight and the LaMotta-Murphy 
battle were piped directly to TV- 
equipped theatres. The eight theatres 
hooked up for the first bout reached 
22,000 customers, while the second was 
viewed by some 27,000 enthusiasts in 
11 theatres with many more turned 
away. Promoters were happy, for the- 
atre TV had added $28,650 to the 
gross of $116,690 taken in the gate 
of the LaMotta-Murphy tilt. 

RCA is the principal supplier of tel- 
evision installations for theatres which, 
incidentally, cost at least $25,000 all 
told. The company, sponsor learned, 
recently booked orders for over 50 
such units — which can project images 
picked up by wire or over the air. Half 
of these, or 25, were ordered by War- 
ner Theatres. One industry seer pre- 
dicts 100 TV-equipped movie houses 
by the end of 1951. Distributed among 
several cities, the combined patrons of 
even 100 theatres would mean a minor 
audience loss. But programwise, thea- 
tre television is an active competitor. 



Q. When will subscriber television 
get underway full-scale? 

A. Best-informed opinion — from di- 
rectors of subscriber TV themselves — 
is that at least six months and proba- 
bly closer to a year will go by before 
anything like a regular operation can 
gel going. Phonevision just recently 
wound-up a highly successful 90-day 
test in Chicago, while Subscriber-Vi- 
sion and Telemeter are planning tests 
for this summer and early fall. 

It looks like late fall will come be- 
fore the FCC will be able to hold hear- 
ings on the three systems. Prospect is 
for a drawn-out hearing at that, since 
the FCC will probably still have the 
TV allocation problem on its hands. 
Once a decision has been reached on 
the systems, it may well be another six 
months before sets can be wired for 
subscriber use. Look for subscriber 
TV to get underway commercially not 
earlier than next spring. 



Q. What are the differences be- 
tween the three systems of sub- 
scriber television presently being 
experimented with? 



FIRST in Georgia's third market 



Georgia's 3rd market it a 
buying market. 1950 retail 
tales exceeded $1)0 million. 
1951 will be greater because 
of the new $600 million AEC 
Hydrogen Bomb Facilities 
Plant, the Clark's Hill Dam 
and Camp Gordon operating 
at full capacity. 



AUGUSTA 




FIRST (power) 5000 W 



WRDW's powerful 5kw sig- 
nal dominates the Augusta 
market, day and night We 
have figures to prove it. 
Or atk Headley-Reed for 
complete informaiion, 



IRST in selling 
i power 

FIRST Hooper-Wise 

According to the latest Hooper Survey (Dec. 
'50- Jan. '51), WRDW is First in the morn- 
ing with 34.9%; First in the afternoon with 
36.5%; First at night with 37.3%. WRDW 
hat a 35.5% in total rated periodt. 



FIRST in the market 

(oldest station) 




CBS for Augusta, Ga. 




His Sponsors Alone 
Make a Sizable Audience 

Fulton Lewis, Jr. is sponsored locally on more than 340 
Mutual stations by 572 advertisers. The roster of busi- 
nesses represented is too long to detail here, but this brief 
summary shows their scope: 

93 automotive agencies 

19 auto supply and repair companies 

6 bakers 
51 banks anil savings institutions 
26 brewers and bottlers 
58 building materials firms 

29 coal, ice and oil companies 
14 dairies 

30 department stores 
23 drug stores 

16 food companies 

43 furniture or appliance stores 

17 hardware stores 
14 jewelers 

14 laundries 

25 real estate and insurance agencies 

94 miscellaneous 

His program is the original news co-op. It offers local 
advertisers network prestige, a ready-made and faithful 
audience, a nationally known commentator — all at local 
time cost with pro-rated talent cost. Since there are more 
than 500 MBS stations, there may be an opening in your 
locality. Check your Mutual outlet — or the Cooperative 
Program Department. Mutual Broadcasting System, 
1440 Broadway, NYC 18 ( or Tribune Tower, Chicago. 11). 



A. Phonevision, the best-known sys- 
tem, is owned by Zenith Radio Corp. 
of Chicago. Its method is to send out 
over the air a garbled image of the 
telecast being sold. This garbled image 
makes no sense on the subscriber's 
screen unless he calls the telephone 
company, asks to receive the "un- 
scrambling" signal over his telephone 
wire. Through a connection between 
telephone and TV set, an operator 
sends through the unscrambling signal. 
At the same time, customer has a speci- 
fied charge added to his bill. 

Phonevision did nicely in its 90-day 
Chicago test. Take was $6,694.00 from 
300 test families who paid "admission" 
to televised movies. One uncertainty 
remaining is the phone company's will- 
ingness to cooperate with Phonevision 
on a big scale. It would mean more 
equipment and servicing, adding a 
complete bookkeeping operation to an 
already over-loaded telephone system. 

Subscriber -Vision is a self-contained 
attachment to the TV set, designed by 
Skiatron Electronics & Television 
Corp. of New York. Here, too, a 
scrambled signal comes over the air. 
The unscrambling is done by inserting 
a perforated punch-card into the small 
decoder which has been hooked up to 
the TV set. These punch-cards (simi- 
lar to the IBM cards used in mecha- 
nized arithmetic) would be sold by mail 
from the company's office, might be 
broadly distributed through chain stores 
and newsstands. Each card would be 
good for a single performance, or 
could be used for a week's subscription 
depending on firm's policy. 

With F.C.C. approval, Subscriber- 
Vision will launch a test of its system 
over WOR-TV, New York in the mid- 
dle of September or beginning of Oc- 
tober. According to Skiatron's presi- 
dent, Arthur Levey, one or more col- 
lege football games will be broadcast 
this fall over the system. He's also 
planning to approach non-profit or- 
ganizations like the Red Cross and 
Cancer Fund on the possibility of rais- 
ing money for them via special charity 
performances. Levey sees rates even- 
tually falling to as little as 10 or 15 
cents an hour when the subscribers 
total 500,000. 

Telemeter is the newest wrinkle in 
pay-as-you-go TV. Developed by a 
group of Hollywood film executives, it 
recently got backing from Paramount 
Pictures which bought a 50% interest. 
Telemeter works much like Subscriber- 
Vision, but uses a coin-box attachment 



180 



SPONSOR 



for unscrambling over-the-air images, 
rather than a punch card. Backers of 
the system consider the coin box a sig- 
nificant parallel to the theatre box of- 
fice, point out the savings in bookkeep- 
ing and labor. According to Paul Rai- 
bourne, president of International Tel- 
emeter Corp. and v.p. for TV of Para- 
mount Pictures, the coin box measures 
three inches by two inches by six 
inches and will cost $25 plus a $50 in- 
stallation cost. 

Tests this summer in the Los An- 
geles fringe area will answer such 
questions as whether all kinds of sets 
can use the Telemeter box and wheth- 
er reception will be affected bv them. 



TV and sports 



Q. Will sport events be televised 
this fall? 

A. From the advertiser's viewpoint, 
the situation regarding TV sports for 
fall has never looked worse. In no 
other branch of TV programing are 
there so many hurdles for a sponsor to 
clear, more cards stacked against him. 

The National Collegiate Athletic As- 
sociation has been the leader in the 
organized opposition against general 
telecasting of college sports this fall. 
The NCAA a few weeks ago slapped 
a moratorium on TV pickups of foot- 
ball games played by its member 
schools — which include the majority 
of the nation's top colleges and univer- 
sities. The University of Pennsylvania, 
seeking a show-down test case, has 
signified it will go its own merry way, 
and allow TVing of all its ball games. 
But, the NCAA is sticking to its guns, 
may stop other NCAA schools from 
playing football with Pennsylvania. 

The NCAA's stand: television pick- 
ups are proving so harmful to the foot- 
ball box office that they will permit the 
televising of only one game by any of 
its members during the season. Let's 
keep TV out this year and see what 
happens. They may make this decision 
stick. 

If you're shopping, or planning to 
shop, for TV sports this fall, you'll find 
the situation will be one of tough sled- 
ding, high costs, and much argument. 

Q. What is being done about the 
threats to sponsored TV sports? 

A. Probably not enough. There is 

16 JULY 1951 



V////y& \ 




An Amazin g 
Vote of Confidence in WOW! 

• Here's the Story 

WOW's "Fourth Annual Farm Study Tour" was 
announced on June 1 on the "Farm Service Re- 
porter" Program, (6:30 to 7 a.m. weekdays).* 

Farm Director Mai Hansen simply said that the 
tour would be to the East Coast; would last 15 days, 
and would cost about $500.00 per person. 

On that information ALONE, within one week 
125 farmers responded— WITH CASH! 206 others 
in the same period wrote for information and appli- 
cation blanks. 

Reservations made in one week represent a $72,- 
500 vote of confidence in WOW's service to farmers. 

So large and instant a response PROVES that the 
great WOW-LAND farm market is solidly behind 
WOW — and WOW's farm listeners are today the 
WORLD'S FINEST CUSTOMERS for any goods 
or services. 

For availabilities call the nearest John Blair Office. 

*CO-SPONSORED BY: 
Garst & Thomas, Coon Rapids, Iowa, Pioneer Hybrid 
Corn; Handled by the Compton Agency; and the Walnut 
Grove Products Company of Atlantic, Iowa; Allen & 
Reynolds Agency. 

WOW's "Farm Service Reporter" observed its 5th Birth- 
day June 19th on the air. 



5000 watts i A fv ^ma m m A 



X 



OMAHA, NEBRASKA 



FRANK P. FOGARTY, General Manager * JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY, Representativ 



'// 



181 



r 

1 



WWRL 

NEW YORK CITY'S 

Sales Specialist 

. . . Moves Merchandise FAST, 
because on WWRL your sales 
story "gets through" to: 

1. Millions of Foreign- 
Language Listeners 

*2. America's No. 1 
Negro Market 

"Pulse Report on request. 

Nothing matches WWRL's potent 
selling power of addressing foreign- 
language groups in their native 
tongues . . . each group is a big mar- 
ket, worth "going after" with a spe- 
cial campaign ... or, to add those 
extra, profitable sales to your over-all 
campaign in New York City. WWRL's 
Foreign-Language listeners are: 

Spanish Polish Syrian 

German Russian Lithuanian 

Czechoslovak French Ukrainian 

Hungarian Swiss Greek 

. . . And WWRL's 5,000 watt signal 
is beamed with specially designed 
and specially produced programs in 
all 11 languages over the entire New 
York City area. 

WWRL Sells America's 
No. 1 Negro Market 

Nobody, but . . . NOBODY matches 
WWRL's potent selling power of 
addressing New York City's Negro 
Market of 850,000 with "their own" 
favorite programs . . . they are loyal 
listeners to such WWRL shows as: 

Dr. Jive Show Morning Spirituals 

Sports Digest Songs by Billy Eckstine 

Spiritual Time Saturday Night Spirituals 

Cinderella Chas. Watkins Spirituals 

. . . specially produced with them in 
mind -SELLING YOUR PRODUCT 
DAY AND NIGHT. 

Only WWRL can so effectively sell 
these big markets in New York City. 
Don't just scratch the surface, but 
get your products really moving with 
WWRL's sure-fire penetration of these 
Foreign-Language and Negro Mar- 
kets. Check today and select WWRL 
availabilities that can sell for you. 

IN NEW YORK CITY 
AT 5,000 WATTS 
and 7600 KC. 

WWRL 

1926- -1951 
25th Anniversary Year 



some fighting going on against these 
pressures from outside the industry, 
but it's sporadic. This is how it has 
been shaping up: 

Spotisors — Not all schools and col- 
leges are involved, or intimidated, by 
pressure from the NCAA. Loyola Uni- 
versity in California, for instance, has 
signed up with the Chevrolet dealer 
group in Los Angeles for a season of 
six grid contests. Reported price is a 
$200,000 guarantee by the Chevrolet 
group against any box office losses, 
plus time charges on KNBH and costs 
of the camera pickup. 

In New York, a businessmen's group 
has set up the "Fair TV Practices Com- 
mittee," and now intend to petition the 
FCC for a license suspension for any 
broadcaster (network or station) who 
starts playing footsie with theatre TV. 
Sports sponsors represented by N. W. 
Ayer (Atlantic Refining, Webster Ci- 
gars) have been putting pressure on 
sports promoters through the agency, 
and have been trying to work out com- 
promise proposals. 

Research — To hit back at claims 
that TV is murdering the sports b.o., 
telecasters and advertisers have been 
doing some researching of the situa- 
tion. A recent example is the survey 
made by WPIX, New York, and re- 
ported on in the 21 May issue of SPON- 
SOR. This survey showed that sports 
attendance at Madison Square Garden 
was definitely stimulated — in the long 
run — by television. About eight out of 
10 of the New York viewers quizzed 



said they had seen a new sport for the 
first time on TV. Of these, 37% had 
actually gone to see the sport in action. 

When faced with these figures, Madi- 
son Square Garden's Ned Irish told 
SPONSOR: "The actual televising of the 
events was not nearly as damaging as 
the great improvement in the overall 
quality of TV entertainment this past 
winter." 

Other surveys ( those made by Jerry 
Jordan, and Woodbury College) show 
the same thing over and over again. 
TV makes more viewers sports con- 
scious. 



Cutting TV costs 



Q. What can the advertiser and 
agency do to keep the cost of live 
television programs down? 

A. There are certain costs over which 
a sponsor has little or no control. 
These include station or network 
charges for studio rental during re- 
hearsals, cost of physical labor put in 
on the show's sets by station techni- 
cians, wages of both acting and non- 
acting program talent ( whose mini- 
mum salaries are fixed almost entire- 
ly by union agreement). 

It might seem from this that there 
isn't much chance for economy. But 
there is economizing going on all the 
time, among imaginative writers, di- 
rectors, and producers who've acquired 



NEW S— f ' om BINGHAMTON, N>. 



ABC 

WENE 

BINGHAMTON, N.Y. MARKET 

NOW 5000 

WATTS 



CALL RADIO REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 



182 



SPONSOR 



cost-consciousness. This bears repeat- 
ing: the original script and its pre-pro- 
duction planning is the place to save 
most mone\ . Keeping the cast small 
is an obvious, though not always de- 
sirable, first step. 

Settings, props, and visual/sound ef- 
fects are the best places to look for 
unnecessary expense. Even before it's 
finalized in the working script, every 
setting, prop, and effect should be 
painstakingly examined. Is it abso- 
lutely necessary for an authentic per- 
formance — or could some less expen- 
sive substitute be found? Ingenuity is 
the answer. 

To help expense-burdened sponsors, 
several products of TV ingenuity have 
come along in the past year; undoubt- 
edly more will be found as experience 
piles up. One of these is the Tele- 
Prompter first tried out on the mara- 
thon TV ''soap opera," The First Hun- 
dred Years. Actors, pressed for re- 
hearsal time, can read their lines from 
the large "running" script turned on 
rollers off-stage — much like the music 
roll in a player piano. 

A more recent aid is Telemension, 
which virtually eliminates sets and 
makes striking illusions possible. Tele- 
mension projects pictures of whole sets 
"around" an actor, turning a bare 
stage into a three-dimensional appear- 
ing scene. It can even appear to put 
an actor right into a scene which has 
been previously filmed without him. 
For example, the live actor stands in 
the middle of a studio and is apparent- 
ly run over by a car — except that the 
car is entirely on film! The possibili- 
ties of this device are only now being 
explored. 

New and dramatic inventions like 
Tele-Prompter and Telemension should 



not blind an advertiser to the value of 
using older, but equal!) effective. TV 
techniques. Rear projection of scenes 
on a translucent screen serving as 
background remains highly effective. 
Super-imposition of one camera image 
on another is another standard gim- 
mick. All the illusions in a magicians 
bag of tricks can be used in TV to 
heighten effect and lower cost: mir- 
rors, "invisible" threads to move ob- 
jects, special lighting, to mention the 
principal ones. 



Q. What cost-cutting methods 
can be used to reduce the price of 
TV film commercials? 

A. As in live television, pre-prodm - 
tion planning is the most important 
single factor. This should include some 
very heavy thinking about the type of 
film technique! si to be used. "Live- 
action" film with sound added later is 
the cheapest, averaging about $1,500 
for a one-minute commercial. By con- 
trast, full animation runs to $3,000 or 
more for a minute: while stop-motion 
I where real objects appear to move by 
themselves ) costs the most at $4-6.000 
for a single one-minute commercial. 

Once the type or combination of 
techniques is carefully decided on. 
from a sales-effectiveness angle, every 
last detail of the commercial should be 
thoroughly thrashed out and set down 
on paper. Where there's any question 
of technical problems the producer 
should be asked to sit in and give his 
advice. The more a producer knows 
about his client's purpose and concept 
of the commercial the better job he 
can do. And when every detail is 
worked out beforehand, there's much 
less chance of later hassles between ad- 




Not the biggest station, but the BIG BUY in cost 
per thousand homes reached in Knoxville's 4 *gold- 
en circle" . . . the industrial metropolitan area of 
335,000 people. Cover this compact market with 
WBIR AM and FM, both for the price of one. 



A* 



F* 



The Boiling Company 



PROMOTION BONUS 
FOR SPONSORS... 

FOUR EXTR 
SHOTS FOR 
EXTRA SALES! 




CAR CARDS with 
sponsor credit appear 
throughout the year 
and cover the entire 
city. 

24-SHEET BILLBOARDS 
blanket the complete 
Philadelphia Market 
area, promoting WIBG 
programs. 



WINDOW DISPLAYS 
of sponsor's products 
face directly on Walnut 
S t r e e t — d owntown — 
the only such display 
on this busy thorofare. 



DIRECT MAIL goes out 
regularly to selected 
dealer lists. Hard-hit- 
ting broadsides pro- 
mote sponsor's cam- 
paign and urge store 
cooperation. 



10,000 Watts 

Philadelphia's 

Most 

Powerful 

Independent 



REPRESENTED BY 

Radio 

Representatives 

Inc. 



TWO TOP 

CBS STATIONS 

TWO BIG 

SOUTHWEST 
MARKETS 

ONE LOW 

COMBINATION 
RATE 

r KWFf 

WICHITA FALLS, TEX. 

620 KC 

5,000 WATTS 



KLYN 

AMARILLO, TEX. 

940 KC 

1,000 WATTS 



When you're making out that sched- 
ule for the Southwest don't over- 
look this sales-winning pair of 
CBS stations. For availabilities and 
rates, write, phone or wire our 
representatives. 

National Representative* 

JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



vertiser and film producer. It's obvi- 
ously less expensive to change or dis- 
card a scene which has never been 
shot, than to scrap one after sets, ac- 
tors, cameramen, props, and all the ac- 
cessories have been paid for. 

Here are some more general, and 
very pertinent, ways to keep down the 
cost of a film commercial: 

1. Try to schedule a whole set of 
two, and preferably more, all at the 
same time. They're cheaper to make 
and individual cost is less than when 
a commercial is made individually. 

2. Frills are nice looking, but should 
be avoided if not absolutely necessary 
for "sell." These include special opti 
cal effects (which have to be farmed 
out to a specialist and cost consider- 
able time and money), write-ons, pop- 
ons, fancy title work. Find out before- 
hand how much it will cost and how 
much extra time must be allowed, if 
any. 

3. Have an agency representative 
either on the set at all times or at least 
easily available to the producer. He 
often needs to ask minor, but never- 
theless important, questions on details 
as the commercial progresses. A pro- 
ducer feels better when he can put the 
burdens of decision on the agency- 
man's shoulder — presumably the agen- 
cy knows its client's needs better than 
the producer. 

4. Once the basic plan for the com- 
mercial has been decided on, stick to 
it. No single commercial can ever put 
over everything an advertiser would 
like to say about his product. And 
there are a thousand ways to say them. 
But a well-thought-out commercial, 
carefully produced will do a good job; 
much better than a commercial that 
seems to be a hybrid compromise be- 
tween three different ideas advanced 
by three people. This goes too for 
over-attention to detail. Changing an 
innocuous little detail after all the film- 
ing is done has cost hundreds of dol- 
lars. Be reasonable. 



Mail order and I*. I. 



Q. Is mail order advertising com- 
mon on radio and TV today? 

A. On radio, mail order continues to 
be an important type of advertising. 
Stations with good listener-reputations, 
like WCKY, Cincinnati, WWVA, 
Wheeling, and others who've built a 



name for honest offers, continue to do 
well. 

The story is different on television. 
Shysters and fly-by-nights who moved 
in on TV and sold viewers millions of 
substandard items have killed TV mail 
order. They've given this potential ad- 
vertising bonanza a black eye that will 
probably take years to heal. As usual, 
everyone in this end of TV advertising 
has been tarred with the same brush 
and the legitimate advertiser put out 
of business along with the fly-by-night. 

Just one indication of how low the 
TV mail order ebb: New York's Har- 
old Kaye, last year a top mail-order 
advertiser via TV, has moved into pro- 
gram packaging and ad agency ac- 
tivity. 



Q. What is the trend in per-in- 
quiry deals? 

A. There have been determined efforts 
to discourage per-inquiry, mainly by 




. in Rochester 
it's WVET 



WVET has more local accounts 
than any other Rochester station. 
(Many sponsors spend ALL their 
advertising budget with WVET!) 
WVET has more programs that 
will win and hold Summertime 
listeners ... at or away from home! 
WVET offers YOUR clients BET- 
TER results per dollar invested. 



5000 
WATTS 




CM^ T 



DA U 



IN ROCHESTER. N. Y 



Represented Nationally by 
THE BOLLING COMPANY 



184 



SPONSOR 



station representatives. In most cases, 
they feel, P.I. is simply a subterfuge 
to get on the air at a cheaper rate than 
a stations rate card permits. It shows 
a lack of confidence in the stations 
ability to pull business and undermines 
the entire rate structure. 

Recently The Katz Agency published 
a comprehensive memorandum on the 
whole mail order subject. Point num- 
ber one: No. P.I. deals accepted — or 
submitted. Robert Meeker Associates 
agree: "We do not accept any P.I. or- 
ders and place only legitimate mail- 
order accounts that have established 
credit ratings and good acceptance on 
mail-order stations." Many other reps 
are similarly opposed to P.I. business. 

One station, WAJR, Morgantown, 
W. Ya„ sends this post card to enquir- 
ers about per-inquiry advertising: 

"Re your inquiry, our Standard 
Contract guarantees you as low a rate 
as any other advertiser. If your prod- 
uct is dependable and priced right, 
your cost on a per-inquiry basis will 
be MORE than card rate." Station 
then points out that its listeners trust 
it; invites the enquirer to place a four 
week order at card rate. 



Merchandising 



Q. What are the prospects for 
merchandising help from radio and 
TV networks? 

A. Network advertisers, both AM and 
TV, will continue to get very little di- 



rect merchandising aid from the nets. 
Reason for this is that merchandising 
is a local proposition which can be 
handled best by local stations. The 
networks (especially radio) do, how- 
ever, provide aids to their stations, en- 
courage merchandising support at the 
local level. CBS. for example, puts out 
a regular merchandising promotion 
sheet for those stations which subscribe 
and also gives monthly prizes for the 
best store displays of an advertiser's 
product. Radio network efforts will ex- 
pand in the fall; could be a strong talk- 
ing point in boosting time sales. 

Q. How about merchandising aid 
for advertisers on National Spot 
radio and TV? 

A. TV stations, except where they 
share a common merchandising depart- 
ment with a companion radio station, 
are not likely to do any more merchan- 
dising than they do now. Many TV 
stations, those in Los Angeles particu- 
larly, are heavily involved, especially 
for certain participation shows. In 
general, competition spurs more mer- 
chandising aid. 

On spot radio, national advertisers 
have shown an increasing interest in 
the merchandising help they can ex- 
pect from local stations. And, faced 
with a harder selling job, AM stations 
are getting more active merchandise- 
wise — some for the first time. 

To the ranks of traditionally strong 
merchandising stations like WLW, 
Cincinnati; WWL, New Orleans; 
WING, Dayton; WIBW, Topeka; KFI. 



Los Angeles; KSTP, St. Paul; and oth- 
ers have been added such stations as 
WNBC, New York; WLS, Chicago, and 
KSL, Salt Lake City. KSL has always 
given merchandising support, but 
stepped it up heavily at the beginning 
of this year. 

WNBC, for example, has its "Oper- 
ation Chain-lightning" by which 632 
stores of the Bohack, Ralston, Grand 
Union, Food Fair, King Supermarket, 
and Shopwell chains in metropolitan 
New York cooperate with WNBC ad- 
vertisers. Advertisers who buy a 26- 
week contract on NBC's flagship sta- 
tion get at least a week, and often two 
weeks in a preferred store position. 
Executives of the six chains pass on 
orders about which product is to get 
preferred position, thereby eliminating 
any hassles between station and gro- 
cery store employees. In return, 
WNBC promotes new-store openings 
on the air and by loaning talent. WLS' 
summer merchandising plan involves 
over 2,000 chain stores; has already 
brought the Prairie Farmer station 
many new national accounts. 



Unions 



Q. Is anything happening on the 
TV union front that will affect ad- 
vertisers? 

A. Yes, but it's not wages this time. 
Television Authority's two-year con- 
tract doesn't expire until December 
1952; but a new one can be negotiated 



EH Consolidated Ratings Show CKNW 
33 3 '% ahead of second station "X"! 




'Canada's 
TOP 
DOG 
on the 
Pacific 
Coast" 



April 1st, 1951 


POPULATION 


RADIO HOMES 


RATINGS 


Vancouver City 

New Westminster Area 


398,000 


117,110 


CKNW 

"X" 6.6 


88,000 
344,000 


24,000 


CKNW 168 

"X" 2.4 


100-Mile Radius 


1 1 3,700 


CKNW 99 

"X" 6.9 


Consolidated TOTALS 


830,000 


254,810 CKNV V 6 -i 



(Ratings are averaged for all periods, night and day, for the entire week, using the latest 
reports of Elliott-Haynes Ltd., for New Westminster, Vancouver and the 1 00-mile radius.) 



16 JULY 1951 



185 



THEY'RE FROM 
MILWAUKEE 

and 

THEY OUGHT 

TO KNOW... 




Renewed Six One- Half 
Hours Weekly for Another 
Year with Ernie "The Whip" 

. . . Another Proof that 
WMRY Sells Goods in 
IS eiv Orleans'' Vast 
Negro Market. 




NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

600 KC John E. Pearson, Nat'l Rep. 



DOG TIRED? 




- ^v- 



DOC DAYS ARE NO DAYS 
FOR A TIME-BUYER 

There's absolutely no point in running 
yourself dizzy looking for the hot 
radio buy in one of the nation's 
largest markets. Any time of the year, 

-dog days, holidays and even Mon- 
days — sponsors confirm that radio is 
your best advertising buy. And in 
Los Angeles, KFVI) consistently offers 
greater return per dollar spent. No 
test or campaign in the four million 
plus Southern California market can 

nsidered complete without- - 



5000 
WATTS 



KFVD 



1020 
KC 



THE CENTER OF YOUR RADIO DIAL 



if the cost of living rises by 10' < in a 
fiscal year. It hasn't done that yet. 

There may be problems in jurisdic- 
tional battles which are being fought. 
These can lead to jurisdictional strikes 
which hold up production on TV 
shows, frequently run up costs, and 
upset schedules. 

A minor skirmish is going on be- 
tween the Television Authority and the 
Screen Actors Guild. TVA claims it 
should represent all actors involved in 
TV — both live and on film. Screen Ac- 
tors Guild, on the other hand, now rep- 
resents all organized motion picture ac- 
tors, sees no reason to make an excep- 
tion in the case of actors making films 
for television. To settle this squabble. 
NLRB has been holding elections at 
the principal producers of TV films. 

So far the victory has gone to Screen 
Actors Guild. Elections at Apex Films. 
Bing Crosby Enterprises, Cisco Kid 
Pictures, Hal Roach Studios, Jerry 
Fairbanks Pictures, and Flying A Pic- 
tures showed SAG out in front by a 
count of 439 to 48. 

A much more violent contest is on 
between the National Association of 
Broadcast Engineers & Technicians and 
the International Brotherhood of Elec- 
trical Workers. 

NABET, once independent, is now 
affiliated with the CIO, has contracts 
covering engineers and technicians at 
both ABC and NBC. The rival union, 
IBEW, is an AFL affiliate whose con- 
tract with CBS just recently expired. 
Following the expiration of the CBS 
contract with IBEW, NABET filed with 
the National Labor Relations Board, 
asked to represent the CBS engineers 
and technicians. 

To further complicate the jurisdic- 
tional dispute between the AFL and 
CIO unions, the International Associa- 
tion of Theatre & Stage Employees — 
which represents all DuMont workers 
— is keeping an eye on the proceedings. 
IATSE claims the right to represent 
certain specialized technicians such as 
film editors and rear projectionists. 

Results of the NLRB hearings and 
any elections which may be held will 
set the framework for future moves. 
Chances are that NABET. if rebuffed 
in its attempt to take CBS engineers 
and technicians away from IBEW, will 
lie low, at least for a while. Success 
lor the CIO union would probably 
mean further jurisdictional battles with 
other non-NABET stations, like New 
York's WOR. 

Although these struggles between 



unions don't directly affect advertisers, 
the repercussions of a stiff jurisdiction- 
al battle can often cause unpleasant 
side results. 



Q. What about the question of 
subversives in broadcasting — is 
there anything you as a sponsor 
should do about it? 

A. The problem of what, if anything, 
to do about Communists in radio and 
TV constitutes a ticklish proposition. 
On the one hand is an advertiser's de- 
sire to avoid unfavorable public reac- 
tion to his product or company through 
accusation of hiring a known subver- 
sive. On the other hand is a desire to 
make sure a person is actually subver- 
sive before depriving him of a living 
and a reputation. 

Unions have found themselves right 
in the middle of the subversive prob- 
lem. The American Federation of Ra- 
dio Artists, for example, took the in- 
itiative in proposing a system which 
would permit actors a chance to answer 
public charges against them. Since this 
machinery was set up, Television Au- 
thority has joined the "Industry-wide 
Conference" which includes the ANA 




WTAL 




5,000 Watts Full Time 



II 



John H. Phipps, Owner 
L. Herschel Graves, Gen'l Mgr; 

FLORIDA CROUP 

Columbia 

Broadcasting 

System 

National Representative 
JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY 



Southeastern Representative 
HARRY E. CUMMINGS 



186 



SPONSOR 



and the four A's. 

It works like this. A sponsor who 
has indications that one of his actors 
is or was subversive can ask the presi- 
dent of the 4's for a statement by the 
individual involved. If one is on file, 
the four A's president forwards it to 
the advertiser. If none is on file, the 
actor involved is invited, through his 
union, to submit one. The advertiser 
then makes up his mind after reading 
the actors statement. 

Actually this arrangement is not 
ideal, although it is at least a logical 
step. Other unions are welcome to join 
the Conference if they desire. 

One union which does not intend to 
join the Conference has just launched 
its own move to protect its members. 
The Radio Writer's Guild of the Au- 
thor's League of America has asked 
the Federal Communications Commis- 
sion to hold a hearing on whether cer- 
tain networks have established a black- 
list of alleged subversives. The RWG 
thinks that such blacklists exist and 
wants the matter brought out into the 
open. If such a situation were proved. 
RWG would ask the FCC to end the 
practice by exercising its license re- 
newal rights. 




New broadcast codes 
and censorship 



Q. Is government censorship of 
radio and TV an increasing possi- 
bility? 

A. Probabl) not. Some extremists (a 
handful of educators, publications, 
etc. I have asked for it from time to 
time, but it's not likely to happen, un- 
less the industry can't handle its own 
problems. 

But radio-TV broadcasters are tak- 
ing no chances. In Washington recent- 
ly, at an NARTB huddle of 103 tele- 
casters, FCC Chairman Wayne Coy 
and Senator Edwin C. Johnson gave a 
"soft'" warning. Coy told the group 
that he had been getting complaints 
from viewers at the rate of some 13 a 
day on the average. These complaints 
had stressed "alcoholic advertising," 
"indecency, obscenity or profanity," 
and '"misleading advertising." 

Senator Johnson, who once proposed 
licensing movie stars (at the time of 
the Bergman-Rossellini headlines), ad- 
mitted that "I like television" . . . but 
warned the broadcasters against "pro- 
gram excesses." 

NARTB president Harold Fellows 
has started the machinery rolling to 
form a committee to look into the mat- 
ter. This group will make "an imme- 
diate and thorough investigation of all 
the aspects of promulgating standards 
for TV ... in consultation with rep- 
resentatives of government, public, civ- 
ic and other special groups." 

By fall, the NARTB will begin draft- 
ing a new proposed code of industry 
practices for TV, and probably for ra- 
dio. If stations and networks go along 
with it. you'll have to be that much 
more careful about the "good taste" 
of your radio and TV shows. 

But ... it wont be government cen- 
sorship. It will be self-regulation. 

Q. What changes will be made by 
the new NBC Radio and Television 
Broadcast Standards? 

A. Without waiting for an over-all in- 
dustry code to be drawn up, NBC has 
come out with a new 39-page booklet 
of radio-TV broadcast standards. Jo- 
seph H. McConnell. president of NBC, 
stated: "This is not a negative code, 
nor are the rules restrictive. Our NBC 
code of standards provides a set of 
practical programing guideposts which 
will make it possible to improve both 



'Radio's finest 

IN 

TRANSCRIBED 
SHOWS 

THIS IS THE STORY 

260 — 15 minute episodes 

Sinclair Refining Co. — 68 markets! 

Westinghouse Electric — 18 Canada 
Markets! 

Borden Co., dept. stores, banks, in- 
surance companies, auto dealers, 
beer — all products 

SO THE STORY GOES 

260 — 15 minute episodes 

Dept. stores, banks, insurance com- 
panies, beer, etc. — all products 

THE WESTERNERS— 

starring Curt Massey 
156 — 15 minute episodes 

Coffee, flour, beer, dept. stores, etc. 
— repeats through 1,400th succes- 
sive broadcast! 

JOE EMERSON'S 
HYMN TIME 

156 — 15 minute episodes 

Flour, coffee, undertakers, etc. 

THE HOMETOWNERS 

156 — 15 minute episodes 

Appliances, dept. stores, paints, 
tractors — all products 

Also — Newest TV Hit! 

WHAT'S WRONG 
WITH THIS PICTURE? 

15 minute TV Quizzer 
Prizes — Jackpot! 
5-a-week frequency 

(^Morton 

RADIO PRODUCTIONS 

360 N. Michigan Avenue 
Chicago 1, Illinois 

Central 6-4144 



16 JULY 1951 



187 




IS YOUR 

SLIP 

SHOWING? 

There are 700,000 men, 
women and children within 
normal hearing distance of 
our transmitter. Do you 
have something to tell them? 
If your competitor is getting 
business that you should 
have — then you have slipped 

and 

YOUR SUP IS SHOWING! 



8ISCAYNC BROADCASTING CO, INC. 

MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 



1000 watts at 800 




our programs and their advertising 
mr»a<ics." 

The new NBC standards, combining 
radio and video for the first time in a 
network code, make some specific 
changes, which will affect advertisers 
planning to be on NBC radio or TV 
this fall. 

Program Content — Tighter controls 
on the good taste, moral values, and 
techniques of children's programs, 
mystery programs, newscasts and oth- 
er show types will be in force. Regu- 
lation of program content is more ex- 
plicit than in the 1948 NBC code, 
which the new one replaces. The reg- 
ulations in NBC's new book of stand- 
ards, incidentally, apply also to pre- 
broadcast warm-ups. You can't crack 
a dirty joke, get a big laugh, and then 
go on the air in the middle of it. How- 
ever, time regulations on mystery 
shows have been lifted. 

Advertising content — More strin- 
gent regulations will be in force cover- 
ing product acceptability. All the usu- 
al NBC taboos will be in force, plus a 
few new ones, such as checking ad 
claims based on surveys, tighter regu- 
lations on the use of "cow catcher" 
and "trailer" announcements. 

In the matter of "length of adver- 
tising message," NBC has taken a bold 
step in combining the permitted 
lengths of plugs in both radio and TV 
shows in one table. However, NBC 
has given itself an "out." States the 
new NBC code: "Since television is a 
developing medium . . . NBC . . . may 
permit experimentation in television 
presentations which departs from the 
stated requirements, subject to approv- 
al on a program-by-program basis. 
Here are the basic limitations: 

AD MESSAGE LENGTH ON NBC 
(minutes nnd seconds) 







News 


All Othei 


Programs 






Programs 






Progri 


im 


(Day & 


Before 


After 


(Minut 


es) 


Night) 


6 P.M. 


6 P.M 


5 




1 :00 


1:15 


1 :00 


10 




1:45 


2:10 


2:00 


15 




2:15 


3:00 


2:30 


20 






3:30 


2:40 


25 






4:00 


2:50 


30 






4:15 


3:00 


411 






5:00 


3:45 


1 .. 






5:45 


4:30 


60 






7:00 


6:00 



Operating Procedures — Here are 
some of the highlights from this sec- 
tion of the new NBC code, covering 
the handling and clearance of broad- 
cast material in radio and TV. 

Material must be submitted at least 
48 hours in advance, including scripts 
and advertising, when "live" shows are 
involved. Tape recordings and films 
must be in a week before broadcast. 



NBC reserves the right to do a 
"fade" on a radio or TV show, when 
there is any serious question of a por- 
tion of it being objectionable in "many 
American homes." 

Serial dramatic programs must keep 
down their opening synopsis of pre- 
ceding installments. You can't let lis- 
teners hang in the air, either, when a 
series is over. Says NBC: "When such 
a program ends its series of broadcasts 
over NBC's facilities, the storyline of 
the program must be satisfactorily con- 
cluded." 

You can't make cross-plugs for an- 
other network's show ( your own or a 
guest star's I in such a way that it will 
"divert the audience from NBC at the 
time such program is presented over 
competing facilities." 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

[Continued from page 177) 

family, for instance, forgot about tele- 
vision entirely on Sunday nights when 
Tallulah Bankhead came on. She had 
such an outstanding program nothing 
could compete with it for audience — 
TV, or the corner movie, or gin rum- 
my. And there are other good pro- 
grams, too, that can capture audiences. 
TV certainly has no monopoly on tal- 
ent and ideas. RCA is still doing all 
right with records despite competition 
from TV and movies. When the novel- 
ty of TV has begun to wear off, as it is 
already doing, the best programs will 
get the audience — and radio should be 
ready and eager to accept that chal- 
lenge. 

Radio has plenty of research to do to 
prove its importance in today's era of 
TV. Case histories of five years ago 
can have no bearing on its effectiveness 
today. Yet there are certainly plenty 
of exciting stories available today of 
merchandising possibilities, coopera- 
tive efforts, which have yielded impres- 
sive results to advertisers. And those 
are the stories advertising managers 
want to hear. They need them to con- 
vince themselves, and their top man- 
agement, that radio can still be a most 
desirable medium to use. 

Merchandising, programing and re- 
search. It's a formula that has accom- 
plished results for other media. It 
should do the same for radio. 

David Bland 

Director of Advertising 

G. Krueger Brewing Co. 

Newark 



188 



SPONSOR 




But not when it's at their fingertips in RARD 

An important agency time buyer says: " The markets to be developed 
by radio advertising are selected jointly by agency and client. Say 
we start in Minnesota and the only information we have is from a 
small station up there. Then I have to go up there personally and talk 
with the stations and people to find out which are good and which are 
not good for us." 

Such first hand field surveys take time and cost money. Only a few 
buyers of time find it possible to work that way. 

So it's a boon to buyers everywhere when stations, like WGY, make the 
information they need available in the SRDS radio and television pub- 
lications and in CONSUMER MARKETS. Market information. Cover- 
age information. Audience information. Program information. 

When you're comparing stations and their markets, it pays to check the 
Service-Ads as well as the listings in RADIO ADVERTISING RATES 
AND DATA,* in TELEVISION ADVERTISING RATES AND DATAf 
and in CONSUMER MARKETS. They may save you much further 
searching for the information you want. 



* Formerly the Radio Section of SRDS. 
^Formerly the Television Section of SRDS. 




Note to Broadcasters: In the 

64-page SPOT RADIO PRO- 
MOTION HANDBOOK buyers 
of lime tell what they want to 
know about stations. Here's a 
wealth of time-selling and pro- 
motion ideas. $1.00. 



Published by Standard Rate & Data Service, Inc. Walter E Boffhof, Publisher 
333 North Michigan Avenue. Chicago 1, Illinois • New York • los Angeles 



16 JULY 1951 



189 



IftV! 



©SPOHSOR Publications Inc. 



»" 



Herbert True dictionary is designed to give 

sponsors an over-all look at television art 



A FIFTH PART WILL APPEAR NEXT ISSUE 

PART FOUR 



Vp^kA Mosl dictionaries are designed foi occasional 
■I use only. \<>t so the L951 "T\ Dictionarj 
Handbook for Sponsors." It is actually an easy- 
to-read text book on the television art. Rather than using 
it to look up an occasional word, advertisers will read 
through its entire contents for an over-all look at the 
intricacies of the medium; agency men who are charged 
with production responsibilities will find its handbook 
material an invaluable technical aid; account executives 
will pass on the "Dictionary/Handbook" to clients who 
express curiosity about television. 

The dictionary is so extensive that, though originally 
planned to appear in sponsor in four installments, a fifth 
installment will be necessary to complete the entire dic- 
tionary. (The complete dictionary will be published soon 
in book form: date to be announced.) 



As an example of the valuable handbook data includ- 
ed in the dictionary, glance at the lens information start- 
ing at the bottom of this page. All principal lenses used 
in TV are described in technical detail. Lights, too, (see 
next page I get detailed description. 

Detail with which the dictionary takes up TV technique 
and technology is all the more remarkable when you 
consider that its author. Herbert True, worked on the 
dictionary while carrying on full-time activities as a radio- 
TV writer and producer with Gardner Advertising Com- 
pany, St. Louis. ( For biographical details about True 
himself, see box opposite page. I 

• The complete "TV Dictionary/Handbook for Spon- 
sors" will be available to subscribers on request. Price 
to others: $2.00. Bulk rates furnished on request. 



I Continued | 

LEGS, RIGHT or LEFT Curtain verti- 
cals, either stretched or on travelers, 
or supporting part of the permanent 
curtain border. 

LENS LOUSES People who wave when 
TV camera pans audience. 

LENS TURRET Revolving device on TV 
camera carrying two or more lenses, 
any one of which can quickly be 
turned into position for shooting. 

LENSES 

35mm. i wide angle Speed: f3.3. Total 



angle of view in horizontal: 51.5". At 
4 feet actual distance from object takes 
picture equal to being 3'o actual feet 
from object. 

50mm. <two inch> Speed: f 1.9. Total 
angle of view in horizontal field: 34 c . 
At 4 feet actual distance from object 
takes picture equal to being 2 l 2 actual 
feet from object. 

50mm. gives you large depth of focus 
dollying in and out, little distortion, 
less difficulty to follow focus. 
90mm. <2\' 2 inch) Speed: f3.5. Total 
angle of view in horizontal field: 19 . 
At 4 feet from object gives picture 
equal to being 1% actual feet from ob- 
ject. 

7 35mm. (5' 2 inch) Speed f3.8. Total 
angle of view in horizontal field: 13 . 



At 4 actual feet from object gives pic- 
ture equal to being 11 actual inches 
from object. 

8V2 inch 1 215mm. I Speed: f3.9. To- 
tal angle of view in horizontal field: 
8 ". 

73 inch (telephoto* Speed: f3.5. To- 
tal angle of view in horizontal field: 
5°. At 100 actual feet from object 
gives close-up. 

75 inch (telephoto) Speed: f5.0. To- 
tal angle of view in horizontal field: 
4.5°. 

17 inch (telephoto) Speed: f5.0. To- 
tal angle of view in horizontal field: 
4°. 

25 inch (telephoto) Speed: f5.0. To- 
tal angle of view in horizontal field: 
2.75°. 



190 



SPONSOR 



loomar Lens Focal lengths: 5 to 22 
inches. Speed: f5.6 to f22. For use in 
quick and continuous variation of fo- 
cal length from extreme long to very 
close shots and vice versa. Gives ef- 
fect of camera "zooming" in on sub- 
ject without moving camera or chang- 
ing lens. Used outdoors and to great 
advantage on such shows as Kukla, 
Fran & Ollie. 

Balowstar Lens Focal length: 7 inches. 
Speed: f 1.3. Total angle of view in 
horizontal field: 10.5 . 
Extremely fast lens used where light- 
ing is unfavorable or of mixed color. 
Sometimes at boxing and wrestling 
matches. 

Reflector Lens Focal length: 40 inches. 
(Actual length: 16 inches.* Speed (var- 
iable* : f8 to f22. Total angle of view 
in horizontal field: 1.9 . 
Extra long telephoto focal length built 
into short, compact mounting to avoid 
interfering with other lenses on tur- 
ret. 

Electra-Zoom One of the latest types 
of automatic focus Zoomar lenses that 
is particularly adapted to studio use. 
Note: Vertical angle of view will be 
only three quarters of the horizontal 
angles given above because the aspect 
ratio of the television camera is three 
by four. For example: an 8 '2-inch 
lens which has a horizontal field angle 
of eight degrees will have a vertical 
angle of only six degrees. An easy way 
to remember lens sizes and compari- 
sons is by the fact that the larger the 
lens is in size or number, the closer 
and tighter the shot. 

LEVEL, VOICE LEVEL Test of mike po- 
sition in picking up talents' voice for 
best qualities in relation to camera 
placement, picture, etc. 

LEVITATION Flying a prop or actor. 

LIBRARY SHOT (1) Film shots used 
in a show but not recorded especially 
for it. (2) Shot taken from a library 
or store of shots kept in the hope that 
they may at some time be useful. 

LICK An ad lib musical phrase usu- 
ally not in the score. 

LIGHTS Definitions below provide a 
glossary of lights used comomnly in 
television. 

Fill, Flat or Balancing Light Used to 
provide general over-all light and in 
particular to control contrast by soft- 
ening shadows which are too harsh, 
or bringing up illumination on back- 
ground objects so that principal fea- 
tures do not stand out as much. 
Modeling Light Used to bring out some 
special feature of the subject which is 
not properly accented by remainder of 
lighting. It need not be a very strong 
light, but is usually fairly sharply fo- 
cused to ensure that only area desired 
is illuminated. Similar to hot light as 
opposed to flat lighting. 
Key Light Used to point up the high- 
lights of the subject, talent, or main 
feature of shot. Usually placed higher 
than camera to give better differentia- 



Herbert True 




To write the 1951 TV Diction- 


Wk 


ary, Herb True toiled weekends, 




nights, holidays for nine months. 




During the day he used rather 


j^NCk. M 


than wrote about TV's language. 


E#^ r^i P 


working at the Gardner Adver- 


A. ■ 


tising Co., St. Louis, as a radio- 




TV writer-producer. Now 27, 


A jmr X ■ 


True was a partner in his own 


^L 7 ^ 


agency at 23; worked as an an- 




nouncer for WKY, Oklahoma 




City and WIN AD, Norman. Ok- 




lahoma, during the years '44-'46. 





tion between upper lip and nose shad- 
ows. Lens may be determined by the 
requirements of the key light because 
it's key light which illuminates the fo- 
cus of interest for scene or set. 

Rimming or Outline Light Used behind 

main talent or subjects to provide 
means of separating them from back- 
ground. If two colors are similar and 
there is strong risk of their failing to 
separate, this light is established at a 
very high intensity from above and 
behind so that the edges of all objects 
it is desired to emphasize are rimmed 
in light. Hands, for example, sparkle 
due to light from behind being picked 
up and reflected by tiny hairs as well 
as refraction due to skin surface chan- 
neling light rays to front. This type 
of light is almost always necessary un- 
less the background is of definite pat- 
tern which contrasts with subject 
matter. 

Kicker or Booster Small light used as 
rear crosslight which may shine up- 
wards or downwards depending on the 
effect required. Used extensively on 
Paul Whiteman. and Wayne King 
shows. 

Obe Liaht Also known as obie, bloop- 
er, or eye light. A small spot usually 
mounted on camera which adds little 
to over-all light, but brightens the 
eyes, face, etc. and causes eyes to glint 
and show with a brightness which is 
never obtained with the lighting nor- 
mally used. Good for facial expres- 
sions when set with controlled rheo- 
stat. 

Broad or Broadside < 1 > Floodlight used 
to illuminate whole set. (2) A floor 
stand type light with wide angle used 
for general fill. 

Backlighting Lighting, usually a scoop, 
directed on the subject from a point 
behind, the front being regarded as 
the side facing the camera. Back light- 
ing and key lighting should be same 
distance apart and same wattage, usu- 
ally 1.000 KW. 



Spotlights Baby . . % KW intensity 
(formerly ' 2 KWi 
Junior . 2 KW intensity 
Senior . 5 KW intensity 
Right Angle Lighting Pattern Basic 
start for most lighting set ups. 

O (Back Light) 
X (Subject) 



(Key Light) 



(Camera) X 



O (Fill Light) 



LIGHT AND SHADE Variations from 
calmness to tenseness, softness to 
shouting, which keep a TV production 
or musical numbers from being mo- 
notonous. 

LIGHT BRIDGE Control board from 
which the ceiling and floor lights are 
remotely controlled and operated. 

LIGHT FLARE White spot in TV pic- 
ture caused by improperly used or 
badly located floor or spot light. 

LIGHT LSVEL Ambient or general in- 
tensity of illumination on a subject or 
scene measured in foot-candles. 

LIGHT METER Meter used to (1) mea- 
sure in foot candles amount of light 
on the set: (2) indicate the amount 
of reflected light from actors and props. 

LIGHT SCRIPT Chart used by the 
lighting technician to record position 
and intensity of the lights to be used 
in a given TV scene or show. 

LIMBO Any area, not within the set 
area, used for cover shots, super-im- 
positions, montage effects, flip cards 
and similar devices. 

LINE A single scanning line across the 
picture containing highlights, shadows 
and halftones. 525-line definition is the 
U. S. standard for television. 



16 JULY 1951 



191 



J 



I 



LINE OF SIGHT A straight, unob- 
structed path between two points. 

LINEARITY Uniformity of distribution 
of a regular picture or pattern on a TV 
picture tube. 

LIP SYNC or LIP SYNCHRONIZATION 

Direct recording of sound from scene 
that is being filmed. This term usually 
pertains to film commercials where you 
can see actors and their lips moving. 

LIVE "On-the-spot" televising of 
events and/or people in contrast to 
transmission of film or kinescope ma- 
terial. 

LIVE CAMPAIGN A series of shows or 
announcements by living performers 
as contrasted to film or recordings. 

LIVE MIKE, HOT MIKE A microphone 
that is on and transmits everything 
you say. 

LIVE TITLES Titling material which is 
televised directly by studio camera 
rather than supplied from slides or 
film. 

LOADED (1) A show or script having 
an overwhelming amount of hard work. 
(2) A script containing (a) excessive 
camera shots; (b) action; <c> difficult 
sound or music cues. 

LOCAL Show originating in local sta- 
tion or in the town in which the sta- 
tion is located, as contrasted to a net- 
work program. 

LOCATION Any location outside of 
TV studio where you are televising or 
filming action. 

LOCK JAW <1> A tired, uninspiring, 




# 



lifeless singer. (2) Talent who speaks 
with little or no facial expression. 

LOG A record kept by stations and 
networks of every minute of telecast- 
ing, including errors. It is required by 
FCC. 

LONG HAIR A term often applied to 
(a) serious music; <b) the critical at- 
titude of "art for art's sake." 

LS-LONG SHOT Shot actually or ap- 
parently taken with the camera a con- 
siderable distance away from the sub- 
ject. When people are included they 
are far enough away so that their fea- 
tures are not clearly discernible. (See 
camera shots.) 

LONG UNDERWEAR Sheet music. 



LOOP Bend of slack film left above 
and below the gate in threading a film 
camera or projector in order to prevent 
the intermittent action straining and 
tearing the film. 

LOSE THE LIGHT Term used in direct- 
ing cameramen as "move to next posi- 
tion when you lose the light." 

LOW PRESSURE SHOW Typical easy- 
going TV aproach. For example: the 
Chicago TV treatment. 



M 



MADAME CADENZA 

vocalist. 



A flighty female 



MADAME LA ZONGA Female who 
moves, shakes, dances nervously, espe- 
cially while on camera. 

MAGNETIC RECORDER Machine, port- 
able or fixed, which records sound on 
a reel of wire or tape. Cost, $90 up. 

MAGNISCALE An object produced in 
larger scale than actual size in order to 
make clear details that would other- 
wise be ineffective or indistinguishable 
on TV. 

MAIN TITLE Title at the beginning of 
a TV presentation which gives show's 
name, etc. 

MAKE GOOD ( 1 1 Offer to sponsor of 
comparable facilities as substitute for a 
TV show or announcement cancelled 
because of an emergency. (2) Compen- 



MAKE UP 

talent. 



Facial makeup, etc., on 



MANUSCRIPT or SCRIPT The written 
TV play. Usually mimeographed for 
direction and production. 

MARK-IN or MARK THE PARTS (1) 

Outlining position of actors on studio 
floor with chalk or washable paint. 
(2) Using colored pencil to mark script 
to make it easier for talent to identify 
his lines in first run-through. 

MARRYING Slang for the photographic 
combining of the sound and picture 
portions of a film in the printer after 
editing. 

MASK (1) Shield placed before a cam- 
era lens to cut off some portion of the 
camera's field or view. (2) To conceal 
by use of scenery any portion or set, 
background, flies, etc. 

MASKING PIECE or WALL Section ar- 
bitrarily used to provide a backing for 
sharp or definite changes in camera 
angles. 

MASTER CONTROL Central point at 
which all studios in a TV station are 
linked, and from where shows are re- 
layed for transmission. 

MASTER SHOT Single shot occasion- 
ally taken of entire piece of dramatic 
action in order to facilitate assembly 
of component shots of which it will 



finally be composed. (See camera 
shots) . 

MATCH DISSOLVE Perfect overlap or 
cross fading from one scene to another 
where persons, objects, or properties 
are in identical positions, and you cre- 
ate illusion of one subject. 

MBS Mutual Broadcasting System. 

MC Emcee. Master of ceremonies. 

MCU-MEDIUM CLOSE UP This term is 
gradually being replaced by more spe- 
cific term, but means a shot that cuts 
off actors or talent just above the 
knees', also wide angle shows object 
and some background. (See camera 
shots.) 

MEDIUM SHOT or MIDDLE-DISTANCE 

A shot of subject or set showing only 
part of each. Midway between close-up 
and long-shot. (See camera shots.) 

MELODRAMA Exaggerated, romantic, 
exciting, and improbable type of TV 
drama. Characters are usually over- 
drawn and stress is laid on action or 
situation. 

MICRO-WAVE TV relay from mobile 




unit to studios or in connection with 
coax as Nashville to Louisville. 

MIDDLE BREAK Station identification 
at about the half-way point of a pro- 
gram as in Pbilco or Kraft dramatic 
shows. 

MIDDLE GROUND Refers to middle 
portions of playing area of studio or 
set as contrasted to foreground or 
background. 

MIKE BOOM A mike on long telescop- 
ing arm which may be extended or re- 
tracted, swung in a wide horizontal 
arc, and raised or lowered. Boom is 
usually mounted on a mobile platform 
that facilitates its movement. 

MIKE HOG Talent that manages to 
edge co-workers away from mike. 

MILK (1) To exhaust or extract every 
possible bit of humor or pathos out 
of a scene, situation, or line of dia- 
logue. (2) "Play to the live audience" 
as Milton Berle does so often. 

MINIATURE Any small models of 
houses, cities, automobiles, etc. 

MIST SHOT A TV shot or still photo 
that is taken through gauze or with 
lens out of focus to achieve soft or 
blurred effect. 



192 



SPONSOR 



They helped build the TV Dictionary /Handbook 




WILLIAM FISHER, 



MIX (D Optical. Gradual merging of 
the end of one shot into beginning of 
the next, produced by the superimpo- 
sition of a fade-out on to a fade-in 
of equal length. (2) Sound. To com- 
bine sounds of several sound-tracks for 
purpose of re-recording them on new 
track. 

MOB SCENE Group of performers serv- 
ing as a crowd background saying 
"hobble-gobble" or "no, no!" or "yes, 
yes!" 

MOBILE UNIT Field television equip- 
ment mounted in trucks, and/or trail- 
ers, generally used for sports, special 
events, and other shows not picked up 
in studio. 

MOCK-UP Facsimile photostats or rep- 
lica of products or container to be dis- 
played on TV show, usually actual size. 

MODEL ( 1 1 Miniature cardboard rep- 
lica of a scene or set made by art de- 
partment, usually for purposes of ex- 
periment or discussion before the flats 
and set are finally constructed full-size 
and set up on the studio floor. (2) 
Miniature model made to be used in 
the actual telecasting of a show in such 
a way as to give the illusion of being 
a full-sized construction. 

MODEL SHOT Shot in which models 
are used. For example, when small 
model ships floating in a studio tank 
are shot so as to give the illusion of 
real ships at sea. 

MODELING LIGHT A light source so 
placed and of such intensity as to 
bring out the contours and volume of 
a subject. Opposite of flat light. 

MONITORING (1) Technique of con- 
trolling picture shading and other fac- 
tors involved in the transmission of 
both picture and sound; this usually 
occurs in the control room and/or at 
the transmitter. (2) To check show or 
spot content and transmission with on- 
the-air pictures. 

MONOSCOPE TV camera tube or slide 
which contains a simple picture or pat- 
tern used for test purposes. 

MONTAGE Impressionistic assembly 




ouis GENE LIGHTFOOT, Evans & Assoc, Ft. Worth 



of short scenes or shots designed to 
bridge a lapse of time or forcibly de- 
velop a plot situation by briefly indi- 
cating the passage of events within it. 

MOOD MUSIC Background music to 
establish or intensify the mood of dra- 
matic action or scene. 

MOTIVATION The reason or appro- 
priate cause of a given event, whether 
inferred or in the spoken lines or ac- 
tion. 

MOVIOLA Special machine used by 
editors for viewing film in small size. 

MR. AND MRS. SHOW Married or non- 
married couple gossip or gab show. 

MST Mountain Standard Time. 

MUGGER (1) Person who insists on 
working too near camera or mike. (2) 
Milton Berle, Jerry Lewis type facial 
antics. 

MULTISCOPE An opaque slide. 

MURAL Photographic enlargement of 
set or scene used to give impression 
that the scene actually exists in studio. 

MUSHY Meaning the sound is all 
right, but the microphone's pick-up is 
poor. 

MUSICAL (1) Type of light entertain- 
ment show containing considerable 
portion of music and dancing. (2) TV 
equivalent of a musical comedy. 

MUSICAL CLOCK Type of musical pro- 
gram with visual multiscope news type. 
Part of test pattern and clock. Music 
background and frequently film com- 
mercials interspersed. 

MUSICAL CURTAIN Music used at the 
end of a scene skit or a play as finale 
or curtain. 

MUTE NEGATIVE Picture negative of 
a sound film without the sound-track. 

MUTE PR!NT Positive film print of 
the picture part of a sound film with- 
out the sound-track. 

35 MM Standard motion picture size 
film. 90 ft. to the minute. 30 ft. to 
chain break. (See film information.) 



1 6 MM Small size film currently being 
used for most film commercials and 
kinescopes in TV. This is about one- 
third as expensive as 35 mm., and as 
reproduced on TV, video-wise, is com- 
parable to 35 mm. However, 16 mm. 
suffers somewhat audio-wise. (See film 
information.* 



N 



NABET National Association of Broad- 
cast Engineers and Technicians. Usu- 
ally TV cameramen, some soundmen, 
and light technicians belong to NABET. 

NAPA National Association of Per- 
forming Artists. 

NARRATAGE Technique whereby one 
of the characters in a set, story, or film 
does all the sound voice over . . . tells 
the story. 

NARRATOR An off-camera or back- 
ground voice known as VO or Voice 
Over. 

NARROW ANGLE LENS Close-up lenses 
... 90 mm., 135 mm., etc. Picks up 
small portion of set or action. 

NARTB National Association of Radio 
and Television Broadcasters. 

NATURAL SOUND Sounds of action 
whose source is shown in picture with 
sight and sound simultaneous. Also 
called synchronous or sync sound. Op- 
posite of non-sync or off-screen sound. 

NBC National Broadcasting Company. 
NBC-TV. 

NEGATIVE Film or kine in which the 
natural tone values of the picture are 
reversed; it constitutes a master copy 
from which a large number of positive 
prints can be made. (See positive.) 

NEMO Term used to designate any 
telecast picked up by station crew 
which does not originate in their own 
local TV studios. 

NET or NETWORK Multiple TV or ra- 
dio stations linked by coaxial cables or 
microwave relay. (1) Coast-to-coast 
network — a group of stations covering 
the whole or greater part of the U. S. 
(2) Regional Network — group covering 
a definite segment of the country. (3) 
Split network — selected stations of a 
network used to meet specific distribu- 
tion or sales efforts. 

NETWORK TIME Telecasting time on 
an affiliated TV station available for 
network programs either off-cable, film. 
or via kinescopes. 

NEUTRAL Theme or background mu- 
sic used under voice over announce- 
ments. 

NEWSREEL Film report of current 

event. 

NICK 'EM Direction to musicians to 
play number or passage staccato. 



16 JULY 1951 



193 



NIGGER Form of screen or filter used 
in studio lighting, usually to cover or 
cut down light from strong spot. 

NOODLE il> To play a few bars of 
background music usually behind titles 
known as noodling. (2) Tuning up of 
musical instruments, practice runs, etc. 

NUT Usually the complete cost of pro- 
ducing a television or radio show. 







OFF CAMERA or OFF MIKE Position of 
a performer is a little too far from 
camera or mike. 

OFF SCREEN or VOICE OVER NARRA- 
TION Any narration that is not lip 
sync. 

OFF SCREEN SOUND Non-synchro- 
nized sound that originates in limbo. 
May be heard without seeing corre- 
sponding picture. 

OFFSIDE Off-color skit, action or com- 




edy line. Poor taste. A "blue gag." 
Tabu. 

OFF-THE-CUFF Also called ad lib or 
vaudeville. Phrase used in connection 
with productions which are televised 
without script or preliminary camera 
preparation or rehearsal where the 
producer calls for camera switches and 
takes as action occurs. Most on-the- 
scene events and many small station 
studio shows are produced off-the-cuff. 

O. HENRY The tag line or climax 
speech of a dramatic sequence consist- 
ing of a surprise or twist ending. 

OLD COW HAND Experienced person- 
nel or staff member called upon to es- 
cort important guests, clients, etc. 
about the studios. 

OLEO Any roll curtain or backdrop. 

ON CAMERA Talent or object is on 
the air . . . being televised . . . either 
or both sight and sound-wise. 



ON THE AIR 

telecasting. 



Program in process of 



ON THE BEACH Not employed or work - 
icadily at the moment. 

ON THE BOARD The engineer or per- 
sonnel on the control board or assigned 
to control room at that time. 



ON THE HEAD Show which starts ex- 
actly on scheduled time. 

ON THE LINE Meaning acceptable pic- 
ture is leaving here on way to the 
transmitter for telecasting. 

ON THE LOG Has been entered in the 
studio record or log required by FCC. 

ON THE NOSE or ON THE BUTTON 

Term denoting perfection in timing, 
focus, etc. 

ONE AND ONE Instructions to an or- 
chestra to play one verse and one 
chorus of a musical number. 

ONE AND TWO Instructions to orches- 
tra or soloists to play or sing one verse 
and two choruses of a number. 

ONE-SHOT il) Picture of single sub- 
ject, person or object, filling picture 
screen. <2) A script complete in one 
installment. < 3 > A single show not part 
of a regularly telecast series, as The 
March of Dimes, Red Cross, National 
Safety Week, etc. 

OPAQUE A complete slide as distin- 
guished from a transparency. 

OPEN COLD To open a show without 
( a) theme: ib> musical introduction: 
<c> rehearsal. 

OPEN END A TV kine, film, or show 
that leaves the commercial spots blank 
for them to be filled in at the point of 
broadcast. 

OPEN LEFT or RIGHT Command to 
place subject to extreme left or right 
of planned picture or camera pickup. 

OPTICAL A trick effect done mechani- 
cally, permitting the combining of two 
or more pictures or film frames in one, 
creating wipes, montages, dissolves, 
some fades and other effects. 

OPTICAL PRINTER (1) Device for en- 
abling images from one film to be 
photographed on to another film by 
means of a lens. (2) Used in making 
reduction prints and for special effects 
and trick work. 

OPTICAL LENS Lens focusing image of 
scene to be televised on the light-sensi- 
tive plate of camera tube. 

OPTICAL VIEW FINDER Device on TV 
camera used by cameraman to accu- 
rately frame and focus scene or object 
to be televised. 

ORIGINATE (1) To issue a show from 
a particular location. (2) To have been 
the first to conceive and record a basic 
TV idea, plan, or technique. 

ORTHICON Very light-sensitive RCA 
camera tube used in field cameras for 
most outdoor pickups. 

OSCILLOSCOPE Electronic tube for 
viewing the picture output of a camera 
chain. Usually used to evaluate and 
control shading operators. 

OUT IN THE ALLEY Obstructed or out 
of the range of the camera or mike. 



OUT OF SYNC (1) When the TV image 
on a receiver screen is seen to roll ver- 
tically or horizontally. It is usually the 
result of the receiver circuits being out 




of synchronization with the trans- 
mitted signal. (2) When sound and ac- 
tion are not reproducing correctly or 
in synchronization. 

OUTLINE Also synopsis or sometimes 
scenario. The first briefly written ac- 
count of a show or film in general 
terms. The writer need not be a TV 
expert. 

OVERBOARD 1 1 1 Too much of any- 
thing. (2) TV show which exceeds its 
allotted time. < 3 > An excessive or over- 
acted characterization. <4> Overcut, 
over-portrayed, or, in music, over in- 
tensified. 

OVERLAP Also known as dissolve or 
optical. Trick shot in which view from 
camera is combined with another. 



P.A. Public Address. Loudspeaker wire 
system used in TV studios, usually for 
directions to people who are not wear- 
ing cans < earphones > . 

PACE Rate of over-all show, music, 
skits, or delivery of lines. A variation 
of pace is used to express a variation 
of thought. 

PACKAGE A special show or series of 
shows bought by an advertiser (usually 
for a lump sum • . which includes all 
components ready to telecast. 

PAD To add action, sound, any ma- 
terial to fill the required on-the-air 
time. 

PAN or PANNING Gradual swinging 
of camera to right or left across a 
scene to see segments of the scene as 
camera moves. 

PANEL Master TV or radio control 
board. Usually in master control room. 

PAPIER-MACHE Substance made by 
combining paper, glue and water, and 
usually cooked. From it are molded, 
usually over a wooden or wire-netting 
base, three-dimensional, irregular 
shapes such as statues, friezes, rocks, 
plaster decorations, or wood carving 
effects used in TV sets, etc. 



194 



SPONSOR 



PARABOLA or DISH PAN (1) Special 
direction microphone mounting, usu- 
ally circular in shape used to pick up 
crowd noise, band music, etc. <2) Cir- 
cular object used in picking up or 
throwing out TV microwave. 

PARALLEL Base of a platform which 
is hinged so that it folds together for 
easier striking and storage when the 
flat top of the platform is removed. 

PARALLEL DEVELOPMENT Device of 
narrative construction in which the de- 
velopment of two pieces of action are 
represented simultaneously by showing 
first a fragment of one, then a frag- 
ment of the other, and so on alternate- 
ly. Frequently used in Martin Kane 
and Famous Jury Trials. 

PARTICIPATING PROGRAM A single 
TV show sponsored by more than one 
advertiser. 

PATCH IN To tie together electrically, 
camera chain, mikes, lights, etc. to 
form a circuit. 

PAY OFF or PAY OFFS (1) Solution to 
plot of a drama. (2) Tag line of comedy 
gag. <3> Final music selection to con- 
clude scene or act. 

PEAKS High points in the technical 
variation of visual or audio portion of 
TV show which may or may not be ad- 
justed in the control room before 
transmission. 

PEDAL PUSHER The organist who plays 
background or incidental music. 

PEDESTAL ( 1 ) Least expensive type of 
camera mount or dolly in general use 
at most stations. Does not have boom 
arm. <2i Indication of picture voltage 
on "C.R.O." < oscilloscope) associated 
with each TV camera chain. 

PENCIL TEST Photographing or film- 
ing rough drawings in animation to 
check the smoothness of the move- 
ment. 

PERSPECTIVE (1) Audio: Relation of 
volume of speech-sound to the size of 
a speaker in TV picture. (2) Video: 
The depth of the image. 

PESTS Unwanted TV fans or hangers- 




on who frequent studios for auto- 
graphs, jobs, etc. 

PHASE or IN PHASE (1) When the 
shutter of camera or projector is mov- 
ing in correct relationship to the inter- 



mittent movement of the film so that 
it intercepts the light at precisely the 
moment that the film begins to move, 
and allows the light to pass again at 
precisely the moment the film reaches 
its next stationary position. <2) When 
the above is not the case, shutter and 
film are said to be out of phase. 

PHOTOGENIC or TELEGENIC Subject 
matter or talent which lends itself to 
the making of a good TV picture or 
photograph. 

PHOTOTYPES Stylized appearance, as 
Victorian, Gay Nineties, English, etc. 

PHYSICAL PUNCH TV scenes or situ- 
ations dominated by forceful physical 
action. 

PICKUP ill Origination point of a 
telecast. <2) The quality of picture, 
sound, lighting, or acoustical values of 
a given sequence, action, or talent in a 
TV show. < 3 ) Electrical device or arm 
which picks up sound from a tran- 
scription. (4) To pick up action and 
sound by a television camera and mike 
and transmit them. 

PICK IT UP or PICK UP CUES (1) In- 
struction to talent, sound, or music to 
respond more quickly when their cue 
comes. (2) To perform when a specific 
cue is given, perhaps by stage manager 
or cameraman. 

PICTURE The image telecast or ap- 
pearing on monitor. 

PICTURE GATE Opening in front of 
projector or camera lens across which 
the scene or film passes as it is exposed 
or telecast. 

PICTURE LINE STANDARD Number of 
horizontal lines scanned per second 
for each image or frame. Present U. S. 
television standard is 525 lines per 
image. 

PIERCED TV lettering cut through an 
opaque or solid surface, backed up with 
translucent material and illuminated 
from the rear. 

PINRAIL Beams at sides of the TV 
studio to which wooden or metal pins 
are attached and to which the lines 
from the flies or lights are tied off. 

PIPE Slang for telephone. "Get me a 
pipe in here." 

P.L. Private telephone line to facili- 
tate more rapid camera set-ups and 
checking. 

PLANT To establish idea or something 
in the beginning of scene, situation, 
or story to be referred to later. 

PLASTIC (1) Plastic pieces: TV or 
stage scenery which are built in three- 
dimensional form to show and empha- 
size their quality of mass. (2) Plastic 
light: light which brings out the three- 
dimensional qualities of set, scenery or 
talent. 

PLATTER A recording or transcription 
frequently used as the audio portion of 
a silent film commercial. 



PLAY-BACK Hi Reproduction of a 
sound-track in studio during film 
shooting to enable action or additional 
sound or both to be synchronized with 
action. (2) Playing or recording for 
audition or reference purposes immedi- 
ately after it is made. 

PLAY OFF "Exit" music, background, 
or otherwise used at end of comedy or 
dramatic scenes. 

PLAY ON Music used to bring TV per- 
formers "onstage," usually when they 
are playing to live audience also. 

PLAYING AREA Physical space in a 
studio occupied by set and talent in 
which scene is picked up by cameras. 

PLOPS Over-accented pronunciation 
of letters "B" and "P" resulting in dis- 
tortion of sound. 

PLOT Planned action of "what hap- 
pens" in a TV or radio dramatic or 
situation show. 

PLUG <1> Mention of a name, show, 
or advertised product. (2) Loosely 
speaking, the commercial announce- 
ment. 

POCKET SHOT Picture to fill the gap 
between MCU and BCU. Usually covers 
upward from the "handkerchief" pock- 
et of a man. Extremely good for "char- 
acter searching" effect of panning with 
actor while he or she moves around 
set. It's possible to follow like this with 
a "pocket shot," whereby BCU might 
bring difficulty in keeping subject 
framed, and MCU might lose the inti- 
mate effect. 

POINTED WIPE Optical where a wedge 




shaped area of one picture moves into 
or out of the area of another picture. 

POINTILLAGE A painting technique 
whereby a plane surface is built up. 

PORTABLE UNIT Field TV equipment 
which can be installed where needed. 

POSITIVE < 1 1 Film in which the tone 
value of the picture corresponds to 
those of actual scene which it repre- 
sents, the dark parts of the scene ap- 
pearing dark in picture, and the light 
parts appearing light. < 2 > A projection 
print from negative film. 

POST-SYNCHRONIZATION Recording 

and adding sound to a film or kine 
after it has been shot. 

POT Slang word for any volume-con- 



16 JULY 1951 



195 



trol dial or fader; may be calibrated in 
decibels. 

PRACTICABLE Real. Actually to be 
used, in contrast to something fake, or 
that is installed for aesthetic purposes. 

PRACTICAL Constructed TV scenery 
that can be used in a normal way; as 
a door or window that may be opened 
and closed. 

PREEMPTION Recapture by the sta- 
tion or network of an advertiser's time 
in order to substitute a special pro- 
gram of universal value. For example, 
when the President speaks he pre- 
empts the show regularly scheduled at 
that time. 

PRE-SCORE (1) To compose and/or 
record for a film before the picture has 
been shot. (2) Recording any sound 
before TV film is shot. 

PREVIEW (1) The show or program 
rehearsed before it is televised; also, a 
dress rehearsal or warm-up session for 
studio audience. <2) To give a sample 
of a TV show. 

PRINT Positive copy of film from 
original film negative. The true pic- 
ture. 

PROCESS To develop and fix exposed 
film. 

PROCESS SHOT or OPTICAL (1) Film 
combining real photography with pro- 
jected backgrounds, or model sets, or 
drawings. <2) Shot in which special 
process is used such as Dunning or 
Schufftan process, as when a scene is 
projected from slide or film on the rear 
of a translucent process screen while 
the camera picks up live action in front 
of the screen. (For new TV process 
shots see Schufftan and Vistascope.) 

PRODUCER Guiding figure in charge 
of all the work involved in the telecast- 
ing of a show, announcement, or film, 
and who bears the ultimate responsi- 
bility for its entertainment value and 
commercial success or failure. 

PRODUCT-USE STUDY A statistical 
measurement of the use of a TV spon- 
sor's products among viewers and non- 
viewers of his show. 

PRODUCTION Another generic term, 
usually refers to the building, organiz- 
ing, and telecasting of a TV show. 

PRODUCTION FACILITIES or FAX All 

the physical and material requirements 
of a television program; including sce- 
nic design, construction, and execution, 
painting, art work, wardrobe, make-up, 
properties, tilling, and special effects, 
both visual and sound. 

PRODUCTION MANAGER Also called 
production director. Individual respon- 
sible for supervising and co-ordinating 
of efforts of various specialists, station, 
and agency engaged in the creation of 
a show. 

PROGRAM (1) Commercial program — 
one paid for by the advertiser. (2) Sus- 



taining program — one supported wholly 
by the network or station and offered 
gratuitously in the public service by 
the station or network. 

PROGRAM BALANCE Proper arrange- 
ment and effective planning of musical, 
dramatic, and other elements in a TV 
show. 

PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS Degree to 
which a TV program meets viewing 
expectations and achieves sales results 
anticipated by sponsor. 

PROJECTALL An opaque slide, usually 
3x4 for projectall machine. 

PROJECTION TYPE RECEIVER A TV 

receiver using optical projection from 
a kinescope tu-be on to a large screen. 

PROJECTING To increase the volume 
of the voice so as to be more clearly 
heard at a distance. Talent off mike 
projects in order to be heard. 

PROJECTORS Used in TV for still ma- 
terial. They include: 
Balop: takes cards or opaques (not 
transparent) only. Size of cards, also 
called Balop cards, usually 3" x 4" or 
6" x 8". 

Projectall: gray telop and multiscope 
usually take both opaque cards and 
transparencies or slides. Size of cards 
usually 3" x 4"; size of slides or trans- 
parencies 2" x 2." Slides may be made 
on 35 mm. film, on 3y 4 " x 4" glass, or 
on film cards and come in double 
frame, meaning 2-35 mm. films on 
edge; and single frame, meaning 1-35 
mm. film on side. 

PROP TRUCK Portable cabinet in 
which smaller props, hand props, etc. 
and/or sound effects are wheeled to 
and from a studio. 

PROPERTY MANAGER Individual re- 
sponsible for obtaining, and who usu- 
ally looks after, the properties of a 
show, station, agency, etc. 

PROPERTY PLOT Detailed list of 
"props" required for any given show 
and usually drawn up by prop man. 

PROPS or PROPERTIES All physical ma- 
terials used in a scene, i.e., furnishings, 
decorations, or articles utilized by ac- 
tors in portraying their respective 
roles.. 

PROSCENIUM ARCH Low wall which 
usually divides studio stage or sets from 
studio audience. 

PROTECTIVE FLAT Set flat addition to 
prevent camera from accidentally 
shooting off or over set. 

PROVISiONAL CUT Cut in a show 
planned before telecasting in case of 
possible need. 

PST Pacific Standard Time. 

PUFF (1) Exaggerated praise written 
for publicity purposes. <2) Highly fa- 
vorable constructive criticism of a TV 
show. 

PUNCH IT or POINT IT UP To accent 



or emphasize an action, sound effect, 
music, or line of dialogue in order to 
make it more meaningful. 

PUT A BUTTON ON IT Direction usu- 
ally to musical director to give a clean 
decisive ending. 

PUT A WATCH ON IT To take an ac- 
tual timing of a show or scene. 

PUTTY BLOWER Trombone player. 




QUICK STUDY Person who has the 
faculty of rapidly grasping essentials 
of a situation, story line, action, or 
changes in script. The successful direc- 
tor, cameraman, or soundman is usual- 
ly quick study. 

QUICK CUTTING Cutting camera shots 
so short that they follow each other in 
rapid succession on the tube. Unless 
used for special effect, very poor TV 
technique. 

QUICKIE Type of film made quickly 
and cheaply. 

QUONKING Distracting conversation 
or actions by individuals who are not 
connected with show, but are within 
camera or mike range. 



R 



RACKED UP TV or radio apparatus 
that is situated fairly permanently. 

RAIN Fine scratches on kine or film 
which become filled with dirt and dis- 
figure the image. Usually acquired 
from repeated use and age. 

RAKE Used in connection with scen- 
ery. To rake a set or flat means to 
shift its postion or angle of alignment 
for more suitable placement, lighting, 
or camera pickup. 

RATES 1 1 ) TV time charges only esti- 
mated by station. (2) Net gross rate 
(prediscount). <3> Net rate (postdis- 
count) . 

RATING Percentage of a statistical 
sample of TV viewers interviewed per- 
sonally, checked by telephone, or noted 
in viewing diary, who reported view- 
ing a specific TV show. 



196 



SPONSOR 



RAW STOCK Sensitized film which 
has not been exposed or processed. 

RDG Radio Directors Guild. 

REACH When a writer or creator gives 
an obviously contrived solution to a 
plot. 

READ FOR STORY Meaning to get 
the general idea of the action, talent, 
etc. Hasty examination of script. 

READ THROUGH Usually the first 
reading of the script by the cast before 
the dry run. (See cut below.) 

READER Derogatory term given to 
talent who sounds and looks as though 
he is reading or reciting his lines rath- 
er than giving them life through inter- 
pretation. 

READING HIGH HAT Reading or por- 
traying a script in an aloof, unbelieva- 
ble, lofty manner. 

READ-Y Pronounced reedy. Quality of 
unnaturalness by talent giving viewer 
the feeling that he is reciting rather 
than talking. 

READY Signal by director to TD and/ 
or camerman as warning of intention 
to use an existing shot, previously 
planned shot, technique or combina- 
tion of shots. 

REC Radio Executives Club. 

RECALL A method of measurement of 
the number of people who remember 
viewing a TV show after the telecast. 

RECONSTRUCTION Real or true to life 
reproduction of actual scene or event 
for the purpose of more believeable 
telecasting or filming. 

RECORDING Means of recording visual 
and/or audio action and sound on film, 
kine or phonograph discs. 

REDUCTION PRINT (1) To produce a 
16 mm. print of a 35 mm. film by me- 
chanical reduction. (2> Substandard 
film printed from a standard negative. 

REEL The spools with flanges on which 
film is wound. "One reel" is 1,000' in 
35 mm. and 400' in 16 mm. 

REFLECTAR LENS Extra long telephoto 
focal length built into short, compact 
mounting to avoid interfering with 
other lenses on turret. Focal length: 
40" (actual length: 16"). (See lenses.) 

RELATIONAL EDITING Editing of shots 
to suggest associations of plan, se- 
quence, or idea. 




RELAY STATIONS A series of low pow- 
er, highly directional, micro-wave relay 
stations separated by approximately 30 
miles, connecting two widely separated 
points, used to pass a television pro- 
gram to distant stations that are not 
or cannot be connected by coaxial 
cable. 

RELEASE PRINT Final print of com- 
mercial, film, or kinescope to be de- 
livered to TV station, client, or agency. 

RELEASE STUDIO Expression used by 
director or producer to talent and stu- 
dio personnel indicating end of re- 
hearsal or broadcast. 

RELIEF Elevated to a third dimension. 
TV displays or material as opposed to 
an element in two dimensions, or flat. 

REPEAT Show that is repeated by film 
kine or re-telecast. 

REPLACEMENT TV show or talent that 
substitutes for a regular show or per- 
sonality who is on a vacation or sum- 
mer hiatus. 

REPRISE Repeat of a jingle theme 
after straight delivery of a TV com- 
mercial. 

RESEARCH The checking by writers, 
producers, directors, musicians, cam- 
era, or soundmen through source mate- 
rial to authenticate or improve their 
efforts on a show. 

RESOLUTION or DEFINITION Degree of 
reproduction of detail of an image, 
scene, sets and/or background after 
transmission through complete TV sys- 
tem to receiver or monitor. 

RESOLVE CHORD Musical ending . . . 
last note or sometimes passage at end 
of scene or show. 

RETROSPECT Show sequence which 
fades back and pictures something out 
of the past. 

RETURN FLATS (1) Narrow scenery 
flats added to the sides of a set to ex- 
tend or confine the background so that 
cameras shooting at angles will not 
over-shoot or get off set background in 
the picture. (2) Used to add depth to 
some architectural features of sets, 
such as a window return or a mantel 
breast return. These return flats are 
placed in back of the window or man- 
tel. (3) Used to finish off sets for 
shows which may have studio audi- 
ence. 

RETURNS (1) Amount of mail re- 
ceived as the result of premium or 
other stimulus on TV or radio shows. 
(2) See return flats. 

REVERSAL or REVERSE POLARITY (1) 

Film process that results in change of 
film from positive to negative or vice 
versa. (2) Positive print without the 
use of a negative. 

Usually restricted to home movie 16 
mm. production; however, upon occa- 
sion reversal prints are used in 35 mm. 

REVERSE SHOT or REVERSE ANGLE SHOT 



Worked in conjunction with existing 
shot. Same subject or object seen from 
exactly opposing angle by means of 
cutting back and forth between two or 
more cameras. Used for emphasis and 
changed viewpoint. 

REVIEW Comments or remarks made 
by a critic about a particular TV show 
or TV personality. 

RE-WIND To re-wind a reel of film or 
kine following projection so that it is 
again ready for telecasting. 

RHEOSTAT A variable resistor. Pots, 
faders, shaders, lights, even camera 
dissolves and opticals are frequently 
made possible through use of rheostats. 

RHYTHM (1) Periodic, regular, har- 
monious beat, or cadence. (2) The op- 
posite of rhythm is time which usually 
has an irregular beat or cadence. 

RIDE GAIN To keep the picture qual- 
ity and volume of sound constantly ad- 
justed for proper transmission. 

RIDE IT Instruction to swing instru- 
ments to ad lib. 

RIG (1) Device used to hold, move, or 
control object televised. (2) Setting 
overhead lights on a scene. 

RIGHT A camera or talent direction 
meaning to the person's own right as 
he stands or faces at that moment. 

RIM LIGHT, RIM LIGHTING (1) Around 
the edges of the subject. (2) Spotlight- 
ing from the back, designed to bring 
individual, talent or subjects out of 
background by virtue of their bright- 
ness. 

RING MIKE Microphone installed over 
boxing, wrestling, or such events to 
pick up audio or sound portion of TV 
picture. 

RISER Small platforms used to elevate 
camera, talent, or sections of an or- 
chestra so as to secure a better picture, 
lights, or balance. 

RTMA Radio and Television Manu- 
facturers Association. 

ROLL 'EM, ROLL IT Order given by the 
TV director when he wants a projec- 
tionist to start film portion of TV 
show. Also known as roll film. 

ROLL UP Trick effect used to change 
from one scene to another wherein 
first picture begins to roll from bottom, 
revealing second picture. 

ROSTER STUDY A TV viewers survey 
which helps the interviewed set owner 
recollect his viewing habits by showing 
him a list of TV shows or stills from 
those shows he could have seen at a 
particular time. Similar to Starch 
Study of TV Commercials. 

ROTATING WIPE Optical technique 
where a line moves over the screen in 
clockwise or counterclockwise direc- 
tion, seeming to uncover another scene 
as it travels. 

{To be continual I 



16 JULY 1951 



197 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS_ 



si'o.vsni! - editors are com inced. al- 
ter weeks of intensive research for the 
Fall Facts Issue, that never before were 
sponsorship opportunities as promising 
as fall 1951. The bargains are many; 
the sales impact of radio and TV is 
often overwhelming. But a word of 
caution : every advertising medium is 
beset with pitfalls for the unwary. 
There's no substitute for knowing what 
you're doing when you undertake an 
advertising campaign. 

Out of the heavy assortment of "tips 
to sponsors" that sponsor's editors un- 
covered we highlight a handful. 

1. Check participations in early 
morning programs — Station reps sav 
that 7:00 to 8:00 a.m.. not long ago 
strictly marginal spot time, is the hot- 
test slot on the market. Practically 
every radio station has a morning man 
program; the audiences are large. loy- 
al. and responsive. Morning men par- 
ticipations extend anywhere from 6:00 
to 9:00. depending on the station and 
market. Just about anything sold over 
the air fits into ""morning men" par- 
ticipations I see 2 July SPONSOR, pages 
19-23). 

2. Ask networks about high-rated, 
low-cost sustainers — With the upsurge 
of TV. many an advertiser has relin- 
quished his effective network radio 
program. You'll be amazed at sonic 

>l the popular low-cost packages that 
the networks can offer for fall sponsor- 
ship. In main cases what might have 
been wrong for one advertiser ma\ be 
exactly right for you. 

o. Investigate special types of broad- 
casting -Did you know thai some large 

idvertisers have found Spanish-lan- 
guage radio in the Southwest and West 
50 resultful that they've maintained a 
hush-hush polic\ for \cars? Did you 
know that the responsive Negro audi- 



ence can be reached via an increasing 
number of stations? Did you know 
that foreign-language programs pay 
out unusually well. These, and other 
special types of broadcasting such as 
transit radio, storecast. classical music 
programs, often are tailor-made for 
your problems. 

4. Check low-cost library service 
programs — One of the real secrets of 
the trade is the job that is being done 
for a few national and regional adver- 
tisers (plus a great many local adver- 
tisers ) with the expertly scripted and 
programed packages currently being 
put out by leading library services 
(formerly called music libraries). 
These shows are available to all sta- 
tions subscribing to each library; can 
be picked up for a song because they 
represent extra revenue to the station. 
Yet many get top ratings in their com- 
munity; provide name talent and local 

TIPS ON FALL BUYING 

In the five question-and-answer sections of 
this 198 page Fall Facts Issue, CPONSOR's 
5th, are set forth numerous tips on what's 
available for radio and TV sponsorship this 
fall, which are the best buys, what to know 
when buying. 

Even more than heretofore, air advertising 
(and especially radio) offers big rewards to 
the wise. Radio's sales, promotion, and re- 
search flabbiness has cost it heavily in pres- 
tige this year — but the medium has hidden 
depths, even in the TV markets. The trick is 
to plumb these depths and draw out the rich 
rewards. 

On this page SPONSOR focusses on a 
handful of the buying opportunities eluci- 
dated in this Fall Facts Issue. 



announcements. Have your timebuyer 
check reps and library services for 
highest-rating programs, then get list 
of stations and markets where they're 
available. 

5. Look into Tl homemakers pro- 
grams — If you have a product bought 
b\ women, you're well advised to in- 
\ esl igate the women - pari icipation 
programs to be found on nearl) ever) 
station. Ranging anywhere from 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m., they afford an adver- 
tiser demonstration and display galore. 

6. Watch morning Tl for oppor- 
tunities It looks as though morning 
TV will be as fruitful as the networks 
allow it to be. Programs like Ruth 
Lyons 50 Club (WLW and NBC-TV) 
and Strike It Rich (CBS l will help the 
late morning along and may be worth 



checking for program sponsorship, an- 
nouncements, chain-breaks. 

7. Check available top-notch tran- 
scriptions — Boston Blackie, Cisco Kid, 
Golden Gate Quartet, Lone Ranger. 
Bold Venture, Hollywood Theater of 
Stars. Box 13, John Charles Thomas 
Show, Let George Do It are examples 
of superb programing available to re- 
gional and national advertisers via 
transcriptions. Yet their number is 
meagre; often the markets you need 
most are unavailable. Best advice is to 
check firms like Ziv. MGM Radio At- 
tractions. Goodman, TSI, Ullman. 
Michelson, MacGregor and learn what 
recent offerings are available where. 
Be careful that program has enough 
episodes to keep running a long time: 
production isn't heavy these days. In 
the TV field firms like United Televi- 
sion Programs. Radio Sales. Katz have 
such film offerings as Fireside Theater 
and the Gene Autry Show. They're 
worth auditioning. 

8. LooA: into nighttime radio station 
breaks — In recent months there's been 
a marked shift from 40 to 50-word sta- 
tion breaks in the direction of one-min- 
ute announcements. As a result, some 
choice slots on choice stations are open 
for the first time in recent years. It's 
admittedly hard to do a real sell in 50 
words, but it can be done. Check reps. 

9. Analyze the possibilities of mar- 
ginal time — Not many years ago 10 
p.m. was unsalable time. It's differ- 
ent today, with many stations selling 
right through the night. Beers, night- 
driving glasses, drugs are a few cate- 
gories who have joined the after mid- 
night parade. Six a.m. isn't as mar- 
ginal as it used to be; years ago sta- 
tions like WHO. WLS, and WDAY 
proved that this is choice time. More 
advertisers know it today. 

10. Work with a TV station-clear- 
ance expert — With desirable TV time a 
mighty scarce commodity, thought 
should be given by advertisers and 
agencies to logical time-clearance tech- 
niques. Station expert Fritz Snyder 
will help CBS-TV and its advertisers 
with that chore. Many a timebuyer is 
ideal for the job. Besides getting sta- 
tion management to say "yes" he 
learns that W MAS-TV has a sensation- 
al newsreel that's open for announce- 
ments: that WSM-TV's Tennessee Jam- 
boree is money in the bank: that 
WMPS has a morning man who's pan- 
icking the Memphis area. Try travel- 
ing your timebuyers. 



198 



SPONSOR 





ZANESVILLE, OHIO has a metropolitan population 

of 50,000 

ZANESVILLE, OHIO has 750 retail establishments 
doing almost 65 million in retail sales in 1950. 

ZANESVILLE, OHIO has 73 wholesale establishments 
doing over 42 million in wholesale sales in 1950. 

Only ONE radio station - WHIZ - serves this 
prosperous Southeastern Ohio area. 

WHIZ has a daytime BMB of 27,280 and an average 
share-of -audience of 61.8 per cent. (1950 conian) 

SEE John E. Pearson. He can tell you how WHIZ in Zanesville is 



btcjcjei- Inan uou Ihmk 



^ 



rmt^WMtz 




Radio salesmen in Washington lead tough lives. 
It's root hog or die for them. A dozen other guys 
are breathing down their necks every day for that 



advertising buck. 



The reason: The Washington area has no less than 
17 radio stations! And in addition, 4 daily news- 
papers, 4 television stations. 

But WWDC salesmen thrive on this competition. 
For just one reason . . . WWDC sells goods! . . . 
at low, low cost. 



We always knew this fact. Now we've proved it 
with a series of tests as tough as the Advertising 
Research Bureau could make them. 

We stacked WWDC up against big daily papers in 
direct competition to see which pulled best. We 
had our fingers crossed, but we're happy with the 

results. 



\\ e'd like you to see the figures 
Blair man, or drop us a line. 



just ask your 



5000 WATTS— 24 HOURS A DAY 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



WWDC 



.Y 1951 • 50c Per Copy $8.00 a Year 




. RF 

The gold rush is on when 
the freeze is lifted. 
I estimate there'll be 1,500 TV 
stations within five years; 
2,500 within ten years. 7 ' 



WAYNE COY 

Chairman 

Federal Communications Commission 



What your dollar will buy 
on net radio this fall— p. 21 



Sfi 



N , P L J 'tor 





Harry W, ■ 
bum 

page 

Chap Stick 

Sells Pomade 

Men 

page 24 



T. 



After-Mid- 
night Radio 

page 26 

Why Sport- 
ing Goods 
Ignore Air 

page 28 

TV: Spot vs. 
Network 

page 30 

Why 1928 
AM Prophecy 
Was Wrong 

page 32 

TV Diction- 
ary Hand- 
book 

page 34 



Radio 
Results 






page 36- 



Mr. Spon 
Asks 



■ 



nercial 



Commer 
Reviews 

page 42 





here's the plan that sells 
the midwest market! 

WLS FEATURE FOODS 



c 



a radio program 



['iii'i 



merchandising service 



featuring 



MARTHA CRANE and HELEN JOYCE 

Radio's Ever Magic Touch reaches into 
the kitchens of thousands of Midwest homes . . 
and onto the shelves of thriving Midwest grocery 
outlets . . . thru the services of WLS FEATURE 
FOODS. For more than 16 successful years, FEATURE 
FOODS, a daily half-hour participating homemaker 
program, has helped leading manufacturers of kitchen 

used products to increase sales in this great market . . . 
in which over 10% of the nation's food sales are made. 

The program combines the talents of Martha and Helen 
(the Midwest's most popular homemaker team) with 

an extensive merchandising service that keeps 
manufacturers constantly advised of what is happening 
in retail outlets ... to theirs and competitive products. 




RECENT RESPONSE 

• Martha and Helen mentioned once that lis- 
teners could receive a copy of a free booklet 
on gift wrapping techniques by dropping them 
a card. From this one mention came 3,171 in- 
dividual requests! 
• During a discussion on making candy at 
home, Martha and Helen offered listeners a 
booklet containing recipes for making home- 
made candy. 1,554 requests for the booklet 
resulted. 



Through its highly personalized merchandising service, 
FEATURE FOODS offers continuous day-after-day contact with 
points of sale to: 

• Improve distribution 

• Stimulate promotion by dealers 

• Get greatest possible visibility of 
products 

• Know how many stores are out-of- 
stock and do something about it 

Further, advertisers receive regular reports 
showing exactly what happens from month to month 
at the retail level. 



mm' -lull ii Itlair Jfau lias the Mails 



EAR CHANNEL Hone of the NATIONAL Barn Dance 



890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, AMERICAN AFFILIATE. REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR V^ AND COMPANY 





TIME ALLOTTED TO NET WORK NEWS JUMPS 22% IN YEAR— That news is hot on nets 
is underlined by figures MBS researchers compiled for SPONSOR. Month of April 
1950 compared with same month 1951 showed 22% jump in time devoted to all news pro- 
graming on all 4 nets. ABC has top gain, with 33% more news; CBS, 13% more; MBS, 
29%; NBC, 11%. In November *50-April '51 period MBS reports 5% jump in homes reached 
by its average news broadcast over same period year previous. For other network 
trends, see article page 21. 

RADIO VS. TV TEST WILL MAKE HEADLINES SOON — Watch for headlines on new series 
of tests to determine comparative sales power of radio and TV. So far, radio has 
scored upset victory, but exact returns and who ' s doing research are of f-the-record 
till all results come in. 

UNITED FRUIT'S PARTRIDGE BELIEVES CHIQ UITA SHOULD GET AROUND, USES AFTER- 
MIDNIGHT^ — Colorful "Pat" Partridge, United Fruit ad manager and Godfather of Chi- 
quita Banana, has been buying after-midnight radio time for his jingles (via BBDO). 
Partridge started on late-night air before recent Pulse survey in New York for 
WNEW disclosed that largest category of after-midnight listeners is among house- 
wives (25.6%). His thinking was that Chiquita jingles should have new audiences 
periodically to keep from wearing thin; that after-midnight represented untapped 
ears for his messages. Pleased when SPONSOR told him how many housewife listeners 
survey had uncovered, Partridge said: "Why is it up to local independents like WNEW 
to do research like this? Why don't bigger radio entities get to work and find valu- 
able facts like these?" 

INSOMNIACS HELP MAKE AFTER-MIDNIGHT RADIO GOOD BUY— One reason that after- 
midnight time produces for sponsors (see article on page 26) is huge total of peren- 
nial and occasional insomniacs. National Gallup Poll in 1948 found that 52% of U. S. 
population reported sleeping difficulty, with women, older age groups more prone 
to unwilling wakefulness. Lewis & Conger, plush New York appliance store, even has 
"Sleep Shop" with slumber-inducing gadgets and manager whose title is "Sand Man 
Number One," so help us (see picture of shop window, page 27). 

HOOPER "MEDIA-METER" TO START WHEN THERE'S $45,000 IN KITTY — C. E. Hooper 
will launch comparative study of time people spend with radio, TV, newspapers, 
magazines whenever customers ante up $45,000. Phone-coincidental method would be 
used twice yearly (maybe during February and August) to establish ratio of time 
going to each medium (hence Media-meter name). Cost to agency advertisers would 
vary from $2,000 to $7,000, depending upon billings or ad budget. "Minutes of at- 
tentiveness" will be Hooper's "common denominator" for measuring comparative 
effect of 4 media on "home behavior." SPONSOR suggested that researchers estab- 
lish a time-based common denominator in article, editorials year ago. 

SPONSOR, Volume 5, No. 16. 30 July 1951. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications Im • 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore, Md. Executive. Editorial, circulation Office 
510 Madison Ave., New York J-'. $8 a year in U. S. $Si elsewhere. Entered a- • •■ I cla matter 20 January 1949 at Baltimore, Md. postofflce under Act ?. March is;:i 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 30 July 1951 

CBS AM/TV SPLIT WON'T BE LAST SUCH REORGANIZATION — During, next season, you'll 
hear of more and more firms throughout broadcasting industry which are splitting 
up AM and TV activities. Organizations like CBS (most recent) and ABC (now in 
process of splitting), have learned that maximum sales effectiveness and program 
planning can't be achieved until AM and TV are separated. Such reorganizations 
are regarded as healthy for radio in particular. Schizophrenia which prevails 
when same executive is responsible for sales of both media is ended and staff then 
knows it's matter of "get radio business or we don't eat." 

$2,S00,000-$3, 000,000 SPENT TO DATE TO MAKE COSTLY PILOT TV FILMS— To date, 
about 250 pilot films have been made for TV, many of them loaded with expensive 
mistakes. Pilot film for full-length program runs between $10,000 and §20,000, 
more than comparable film made as part of series. Most pilot reels are made on 
borrowed money, with hope of interesting advertiser, agency, or network in future 
shows of series. 

KEEP YOUR EYE ON WE INTRAUB — With topnotcher Carlos Franco in as radio/TV chief 
and William Weintraub himself one of radio/TV's shrewdest innovators, Weintraub 
agency can be expected to continue its succession of pioneering maneuvers, includ- 
ing opening up of late-evening TV air (via "Broadway Open House," NBC-TV) ; opening 
up of Saturday morning network time on TV ("Two Girls Named Smith," "Theatre of 
Romance," etc., ABC-TV). 

HOW 70 PUT FM STATION IN BLACK? — Here's answer, in salty Texas language of 
Charles Balthrope, owner KITE, KITE-FM, San Antonio. "KITE-FM was in the black 
the day we threw the switch. But the corners we cut are rare. One engineer, non- 
talking type, runs entire show on regular shift. Everything is transcribed, week 
in advance. Starvation rates had us sold out (except 15 minutes) 7:15 to 10 p.m. 
the day we opened. We won't let anyone change copy oftener than once weekly, many 
run unchanged for a month. Ain't bragging, but our foot's on first base, anyway." 

CANADIAN RESEARCH FIRM BUYS RETAIL SHOP AS ADVERTISING LABORATORY— -Penn 
McLeod and Assoc. , Canadian radio rating and market research firm, bought tailor 
shop recently in Toronto to use in tests of radio commercials and other research 
connected with advertising-marketing. McLeod found shop got so many orders via 
radio plugs it had to call up competitors and give away business. But demonstrat- 
ing AM pull was not main purpose of experiments. Primarily, shop allowed research- 
ers to make thorough study of why's, how's, other basic questions connected with 
sales. It is probably first instance of research firm buying own business for tests. 

WHO D OES BETTER TV FILM- PRODUCTION /OB, HOLLYW OOD OR N. Y.? — Ad manager of 
large drug firm, recently back from Coast, had only raves for Hollywood film com- 
mercial firms. They do better all-around job cheaper was his verdict. He cited 
teamwork of all members of production unit and availability of good actors, ac- 
tresses at less than models get in New York. Other ad managers, however, have told 
SPONSOR they prefer New York film producers, find coordination with Coast is cum- 
bersome. 



SPONSOR 



OF 18 



vSiimjr^ 




An independent survey of radio listening 
habits in the Red River Valley was recently 
made by students at North Dakota Agricul- 
tural College. The Survey covered 3,969 farm 
families in 22 counties within about 90 miles 
of Fargo. In answer to the question, "To 
what radio station does your family listen 
most?", 78.6% of the families said WD AY, 
4.4% Station "B", 2.3% Station "C", 2.1% 
Station "D", etc. WD AY was a 17-to-l choice 

^Competition includes local studios of the 



over the next station ... a Hfeto-l favorite 
over all competition combined!* 

It's the same story in town. Year after year, 
WDAY makes a run-away of the Hooper 
race, consistently getting a 3-to-l greater Share 
of the Fargo-Moorhead Audience than all 
other stations combined! 

Truly, WDAY is a colossal radio buy in a 
stupendous farm market. Write direct, or ask 
Free & Peters for all the facts. 

other three major networks. 




WDAY • NBC * 97 ° KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 

FREE & PETERS, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 




(W\ 



11 vw 





DIGEST FOR 30 JULY 1951 



VOLUME 5 NUMBER 16 



ARTICLES 



What your dollar trill buy on net ratlio this fall 

AM webs in all-out effort to lure new sponsors, recapture old ones, now 
offer more than ever for program dollar 



Even truek drivers use it now 

Lip pomade, hand lotion used to be "sissy" items. But the Chap Stick 
Company, aided by spot radio, sells plenty of these products to men 



l» f «'#•- mill iii «;/ir 

Those after-midnight radio hours have undeveloped potential for sponsors. 
They cost less, have brought many advertisers surprising ratings and results 



Why sportiny yoods iynore the air 

Though sports market has blossomed in past 10 years, SPONSOR believes 
these manufacturers are missing an excellent bet by neglect of radio/TV 



What's your TV choice: spot or network? 

SPONSOR examines both sides of the growing battle between the TV 
nets and the station reps for millions in billings 



If <*u- riyht was Stuart Chase's 1928 prophecy? 

Reader's Digest article 23 years ago by noted economist Chase was crowd- 
ed with dire forebodings which haven't been borne out by the years 



TV Dictionary / Handbook tor Sponsors 

Here is final installment of Herbert True's lexicon, completing the journey 
from "AAAA" to "Zoomar lens"; an appendix lists helpful TV books 



COMING 



f mil in ins on ffi<» air 



21 



24 



2H 



28 



30 



32 



34 



Premium merchandising, a century old this year, is at an all-time high. 

Who uses it, how, with what results are pinpointed in SPONSOR survey 13 lll«/. 



S union hi erch a n d i s i n y 

More and more stations now offer merchandising services to sponsors as a 

plus. SPONSOR will present exhaustive report on subject ■•> .lllf/. 



SPONSOR INDEX, January-June, 1951 

More than 100 of SPONSOR'S use articles will be indexed in the next 

issue, by product categories, and industry subjects 13 lllf/. 



DEPARTMENTS 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

510 MADISON 

NEW AND RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR: HARRY W. GUPPY 

P. S. 

RADIO RESULTS 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

TV COMMERCIALS 

ROUNDUP 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



6 

8 
13 
16 
18 
36 
38 
42 
44 
80 




COVER: Wayne Coy, FCC Chairman, looks 
upon speedy lifting of the TV freeze as an 
obligation of his office, has fought to prevent 
lengthy oral hearings (originally scheduled to 
start 30 July). He is convinced TV's growth 
will be rapid once FCC begins granting new 
licenses (see his prediction on cover). But 
there are so many complications that most 
observers believe first new stations won't 
actually be on air till late in 1952, and those 
only in smaller markets. (For editorial on 
television freeze, see page 80 of this issue.) 

Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Erik H. Arctander, Frank 
Rasky, Charles Sinclair 

Ass't Editors: Fred Birnbaum, Lila Lederman, 
Richard A. Jackson 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President - Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 
(Western Manager), George Weiss (Trav- 
eling Representative, Chicago Office), John 
A. Kovchok (Production Manager), Edna 
Yergin, John McCormack 

Vice-President - Business Mgr.: Bernard Piatt 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub- 



scription Manager) 
ine Villanti 



Emily Cutillo, Joseph- 



Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 
Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

r shed biweekly by SPONSOR publications INC.. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 510 Madison l.ve., Not i"ork 22, 
N. Y Telephone MTJrraj Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office 
161 E. Grand Ave., Suite I m Telephone: SUperloi 7 986S 
VVest Coast Office: 6081 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles 
Telephone: Hillside 8089 Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
\.,. Baltimore 11, Md Subsn ipiicms: l'niicd suics 
$8 a year, Canada and foreign $9, Single copies 50c. 
Printed in U. S. .\. Address .ill correspondence t<> 510 
Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. Copyright 1951, 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



CWKH MAKES BUSINESS 
MEET FOR SYRUP COMPANY! 



t'seasy, 



HEN YOU 
^OW HOW! 



SALES OF JOHNNIE FAIR SYRUP 






$ Percentages are in 
units of merchandise 
— not dollar volume. 



1st QUARTER 



2nd QUARTER 



3rd QUARTER 



4th QUARTER 



ANNUAL TOTAL 



1949 INCREASE 
OVER 1948* 



26.6% 



28.6% 



45.2% 



59.0% 



38.5% 



1950 INCREASE 
OVER 1949* 



35.1% 



54.1 % 



90.6% 



5.4% 



47.4% 



TOTAL SALES FOR 1950—102.7% GREATER THAN 1948! 



vate in 1948, Mr. J. R. Murphy of the Shreveport Syrup 
ompany came to us for advice. Syrup sales, including those 
f his company's Johnnie Fair Syrup, had been going down 
'eadily for years. Would radio help — or should he look 
>r another product? 

7e believe in radio, and told him so. He decided to try a 
impaign on KWKH. The chart above shows the results. 
950 sales of Johnnie Fair Syrup were 102.7% 
reater than in 1948! Yet competitive brands continue 



decl 



ine: 



7hat kind of campaign did it take to do the job? During all 
f 1949, Johnnie Fair Syrup was advertised exclusively on 
wWKH — at first with a 15-minute, Class C strip on week- 
ays; and then, later, an additional 15-minute, Class B strip. 

oday the company is also using several radio stations out- 
de KWKH's territory. But these two programs on 
CWKH still represent over half of Shreveport 
yrup's advertising budget! 

^hat may we sweeten for you? 



50,000 Watts • CBS 




KWKH 



Texas 



SHREVEPORT f LOUISIANA 



The Bran ham Company ArlcOktlSAS 

Representatives 

Henry Clay, General Manager 



/ 



.-*' 



*** 



^r^*-***! 



Program 
promotion 



that's what 
you like about 
the South's 




5,000 waft affiliate in Baton Rouge, La. 




AFFILIATED WITH THE STATE-TIMES AND MORNING ADVOCATU 
FURTHER DATA FROM OUR NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO. 
6 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



\ mini: wife we know complains of her husband, an older gent, 
that he tries to "inflict his experience" in avoiding costly or un- 
productive places, persons and predicaments. Wife's irritation ex- 
presses itself in the comment, "I want the right to make my own 
mistakes." 

Chums, television is that young wife and let no antique knight 
(A.K.) from radio try to inflict radio experience. 

* * * 

If it seems needlessly expensive to plunge ahead making radio 
errors all over again in television, only time, self-learned lessons and 
maybe some louder hollering from sponsor sources can persuade 
the producers, directors, writers and the often-equally-uninformed 
account executives. 

* * * 

Take the present excrescence upon the body video of crudely 
literal, artistically awkward, excessively "on camera." nightmarish 
"horror." This is suspense stuff, in trade definition, and a standard 
entertainment commodity. Only TV is going back 15 or 20 years 
to clumsy story-telling methods which must, by their nature, evoke 
public clamor from family and church and education spokesmen. 
Why do it that way? Why stubbornly refuse to learn the lessons 
radio has to tell? Pride of medium? TV is too big, fresh, won- 
derful and pioneering to be taught anything by the "has-been" 
medium? 

* * * 

There's nothing esoteric or highbrow or special about the basic 
fact known to all writers and editors: to wit. that the cheapest trick 
of all cheap tricks in suspense and crime writing is having the 
killer "insane." Again and again recent TV horror has resorted to 
this crude "explanation." So what do we have on our screens? An 
unmotivated mad-dog running wild in a home, with the lights and 
phone cut off. with sweet granny, a dear little blonde with her dolly 
under arm, a paralyzed war veteran and a beautiful wife all about 
to have their throats slashed b\ an infinitely clever slaughterer, a 
total stranger, possessing all the thinking powers of a human being 
but convenient!) i for the writer) bereft of human fear and human 
conscience. 

* * * 

TV also is guilty of what writers call the "dangling finish." Story 
shows must not arouse expectations they then fail to satisfy. Even 
on a minor plane this can irritate the audience. Admittedly minor 
wa> a recent telecast of The Clock (Esso) wherein the entire incident 
had to do with the recall of an automobile license number in order 
to apprehend the hit-and-run driver. Here was a case of arousing 
an Interest in the hit-and-i miner but llie show ended simply by 
saying he would now be arrested. Viewers wanted to view the 
\ ill, iin lull lime was up. 



i Please turn to i><i^<- 62 I 



SPONSOR 




LAWRENCE C-GIUIMBHMNER AVDVEMTJISJING AGENCY 

INC. 

<1 East 41 ? Street oNewljvrk 17, \ \fJU. 



TELEPHONE: MURRAY HILL 2-5680 



June 12, 1951 



Mr. Walter H. Goan 

General Manager 

Station WAYS 

City Savings Bank Building 

120 E. Third Street 

Charlotte 2, North Carolina 

Dear Mr. Goan: 

I thought you'd be interested in knowing that our Chap Stick - 
Chap-ans campaign with you was quite satisfactory — so much so 
that we're getting set for a repeat run beginning again in 
October. 

We certainly hope that at that time your programming will not 
have changed - and that Alonzo Squires will still be on the job. 

We are already in touch with Avery-Knodel and they can have our definite 
orders the moment they can accept them. We are again planning on 
20 to 22 weeks... and, knowing that you keep the Alonzo Squires show 
pretty well sold up, ask you to bear us in mind and save time for us I 

Thanks for your nice cooperation - and please express our appreciation 
to Alonzo Squires. 

"Sincerely, 

PGG:jr PAUL G. GUMBINNER 

cc : Avery-Knodel 




Madison 



IT'S IN THE CARDS! 

In Quebec, radio does a job 
matched by no other medium 
. . . And in radio, CKAC— 
reaching two out of every three 
French radio homes in the entire 
Province — does a job compar- 
able to no other station. That's 
why it's CKAC — inevitably ! 

CBS Outlet in Montreal 

Key Station of the 

A TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CKAC 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatt! 

Representatives: 

Adam J. Young Jr. - New York, Chicago 

William Wright - Toronto 



MORNING MEN 

Have read with interest your 2 July 
issue. The article entitled "Morning 
Men" was of particular significance to 
me because we are just now involved 
in scheduling several accounts in pro- 
grams like these. The tabulation of 
"sets in use" is indeed helpful. 

I have just one bone to pick, and 
that is the inclusion of Marjorie Mills 
as "one of the few wake-up women." 
Come now — Marge starts her daily 
broadcasts at 12:30 p.m. — and no one 
will believe that is a regular rising 
hour for New Englanders. 

Alice M. Liddell 
Ingalls-Miniter Company 
Boston 



Imagine my disappointment at read- 
ing the story on "Wake-L p Time Pro- 
graming" in 2 July SPONSOR and real- 
izing that WBNS was not represented 
in this otherwise excellent article! . . . 

For WBNS has one of the outstand- 
ing morning disc jockeys in the coun- 
try — he's Irwin Johnson, the "Early 
Worm." who very recently celebrated 
his 4000th broadcast by emceeing a 
three-day stage show with Patti Page 
and Guy Mitchell. 

Johnson has been with WBNS since 
1934 and has had the Early Worm 
program since August 1, 1940. His 
show is consistently sold out and only 
a few months ago he took to the air a 
quarter hour earlier to accommodate 
a sponsor who wanted his show 15 
minutes across the board. 

His current broadcast hours are 
6:30 to 7:30. 7:45 to 8, and 8:15 to 
9:15 a.m.. Monday through Saturday. 
And the "Early Worm" has a stack of 
success stories — at least a dozen ad- 
vertisers have used his show all along. 
Ann Evans 

Director. Program Promotion 

WBNS 

Columbus, Ohio 



We were talking about the binders 
for sponsor and I related that some- 
where along the way I had misplaced 
what is probably the most important 
source of information in my job . . . 
a complete set of issues of sponsor 
during 1950. As assistant to Scotty 
Keck, Director of TV and Radio, it 
falls on my shoulders to keep abreast 
of current news, keep track of competi- 
tors, watch for significant trends, etc. 
Being without a file of sponsor is like 
trying to digest the news in a stack 
of newspapers . . . sure! . . . you get 
the job done eventually but it would 
be much faster if you have an "inter- 
pretative" news magazine like sponsor. 
David Rogers 
Assistant to the Director 
Radio-TV Department 
Henri, Hurst and McDonald 
Ch icago 



SPONSOR VITAL 

That "amazing" picture on my desk 
taken at the NARTB convention keeps 
reminding me of the favor I asked of 
you then and thai I hetter get the in- 
formation to vou for action, 



BMB OBSOLETE? 

I read with a great deal of interest 
your excellent treatment of the ques- 
tion of the obsolescence of BMB data. 
As you may know, I am in the midst 
of determining what the broadcasters' 
attitude on this subject is and I must 
say that, obsolete or not obsolete, a 
surprisingly large number of broad- 
casters seem willing to leave matters 
as they are. This indicates that, in 
spite of the statements which some of 
the agency people have made for puh- 
lication. they have not transmitted to 
the stations any feelings of need or 
urgency in the matter. As long, in 
other words, as the agencies (regard- 
less of what they say ) will be satisfied 
with antique data, the broadcasters 
seem to see no reason for bringing 
them up to date. I feel that the agen- 
cies hold the key to this matter. 

In passing. I was interested in your 
cover which raises the question of the 
constitutionality of transit radio vs. 
car cards. If you will remember Judge 
Miller's comments on the court deci- 
sion, however, you will note that the 
Judge was much more interested in the 
child in the picture than in the car 
cards. If a loud speaker can be quieted 
because it compels listening by a cap- 
tive audience, the child in the picture 
can also be shut-up as soon as he be- 
gins to cry. 

Kenneth H. Baker 

Director of Research 

NARTB 

Washington, D. C. 



SPONSOR 



The best answer to ANA: 



Radio Beats 

Newspapers 

in 5 out of 7 

Los Angeles tests 



* * * 

Advertising is not bought simply to be measured by 

Hooper, Starch, Pulse, Nielsen, and 

the Continuing Study. 

Advertising is bought to 

bring people to merchandise and services. 

How successfully an advertising medium performs this 

function is the best measurement, the only real 

measurement of whether it is 

overpriced or underpriced. 

* * * 

While the radio rate controversy was at its peak, 

six of the country's largest retailers were 

testing Radio in Los Angeles. 

They were making a series of Radio vs Newspaper 

tests in May, 1951 — when there were 

already nearly 800,000 TV sets in 

Los Angeles county alone. 



These six retailers were using the 
now-famous ARBI method of checking 
results: An equal amount of money 
is spent on the same item at the same 
time in two or more media. Interviewers 
at the point of sale keep score on 
what brought the people to the goods. 



In LOS AngeleS, Radio brought a greater 
number of people to the point of purchase 
in 5 of the 7 tests these six retailers made. 
(Naturally, Radio's total traffic for the seven 
tests was higher than newspaper traffic.) 
Radio was more effective for these major 
stores on the following items: 
Barker Bros. : Patio chair 
Bullock's Downtown: Woman's topper 

and cotton dress 
Harris and Frank: Man's suit 
Owl-Rexall Drug Co. : Sun glasses 
Sears Roebuck and Co. : Refrigerator 
Every Los Angeles newspaper was used at 
one time or another in these tests. KFI and 
one other station were used exclusively. 



We repeat '. Advertising is bought to 
bring people to merchandise. 
And, 5 out of 7 times, Radio brought 
more buyers to the goods for these 
Los Angeles retailers, who, incidently, 
have two clearly-defined advantages in 
their newspaper advertising over every 
national advertiser: 

1. They buy newspaper advertising 
for approximately half what the 
national advertiser pays. 

2. Their advertising, like all retailer 
copy, enjoys higher average readership 
than national advertising. 

Yet, despite the advantages to newspapers 
inherent in a check of retailer advertising . 
despite Los Angeles' high concentration 
of TV sets . . . despite any decline in 
radio audience, real or imagined . . . 
Radio outsold — by a wide margin - 
a major competing medium. 



This is the best answer we know to 
the suggestion that Radio is now 
overpriced in television markets. 



%c*su Q.CUA^m^. KFI 



NBC in Los Angeles • 50,000 watts 
Clear Channel • 640 kilocycles 



30 JULY 1951 



There's *6 Bill* 



i ^j ^ ^j 





When is 5,000 watts more than 5,000 watts? 

When it's first on the dial ! Operating at 5W) 
kilocycles, WFIL's 5,000 watts provide coverage 
equal to twenty times the power at double the 
frequency . . . 100,000 watts at 1120 kilocycles. 



SELL THE CITY ITSELF 

The "Hard $ell" is WFIL's specialty. Tha 
what you need in Philadelphia's highly co 
petitive city zone market. Concentrated h 
is more than half the area's $6,638,759X 
effective buying income. Here are more tb 
two million people who spend $2,209,935,C 
in retail stores alone. Here four-fifths of i 
city's radio families make a habit of tuni 
WFIL. That's why WFIL can do your ha 
selling job. You're first on the dial when y 
schedule WFIL. 



siting for you in 



elD 




)me and get it! 






»H M. KATZ, Burlington house- 
|e — She buys for an all-important 
itie . . . a radio-equipped home, 
t of 1,242,000 in the 14-County 
[ladelphia Retail Trading Area, 
pseholds like hers help consume 
billion worth of food a year. 
I 



J. I. McDONELL, Atlantic City 
hotel man — Gracious hosr at the 
Chalfont-Haddon Hall, Mr. 
McDonell sees thousands of vaca- 
tioners each year . . . and millions 
more spend $82,523,000 in WFIL- 
adelphia's 756 hospitable hotels. 



RAYMOND F. SWENSON, Phila- 
delphia auto dealer — WFIL-adel- 
phians own 901,189 automobiles 
. . . each year they buy $508,287 000 
worth of new and used cars from 
men like Mr. Swenson, Vice-Presi- 
dent of Alvin A. Swenson, Inc. 



J. D. BRANDNER, Wilmington 
scientist — As a research executive of 
the Atlas Powder Company, Dr. 
Brandner guides others in the search 
for new products and processes. 
He is one of 115,000 professional 
people in the 14-County market. 



SELL THE WHOLE 14-COUNTY MARKET 

You lose half the market, half the sales unless 
you hit hard in all 14 populous counties of 
the Philadelphia Retail Trading Area. You hit 
hard with WFIL's 5000 watts — a beam that 
outpulls 50,000 watts in 11 of the 14 counties. 
Cash in on this rich potential . . . 4,400,000 
people. . . $4 billion in retail sales. Cash in, too, 
on WFIL's tremendous bonus area outside the 
Retail Trading Area. Total coverage: 6,800,000 
people with buying power of more than $9 
billion. Schedule WFIL. 




we cotioii to you . . . 

Carolina farmers raise a $135,000,000 crop yearly 
and 463 Carolina cotton-textile mills process 
almost as much as the other 46 stales combined.* 
Prosperous cotton farmers and textile workers 
are the basic fiber of WBTs audience of 
3,000.000 listeners — the largest group 
of your prospects you can reach by any 
single advertising medium in 
the two Carolinas. 




*39% of U. S. mills producing 
broad-woven cotton fabric and 
55% of U. S. cotton yarn milts 
. . . value of annual production 
2 billion dollars! 



COLOSSUS OF THE CAROLINAS 



JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Represented Nationally by Radio Sales 



New and renew 




3 JULY 1951 



1. New on Ruilio Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Chicle Co 




Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 


ABC 


1 16 


Dr. Pepper 




li.iilir.nill & Ryan 


CBS 


47 


Economics Laboratory 


In. 


Cunningham & Walsh 


CBS 


181 


General Mills Inc 




Knox-Reeves 


ABC 


163 


General Mills Inc 




Knox-Reeves 


ABC 


163 


North American Van 


Lines 


Joseph Castor & 


ABC 


289 


Inc 




Associates 






Sylvania Electric Pr* 


■ducts 


Roy S. Durstine 


CBS 


45 


Inc 










U. S. Army & V. S. 


Air 


Grant 


NBC 


167 


Force 










U. S. Army & V. S. 


Air 


Grant 


CBS 


145 


Force 











The Sheriff; Fri 9:30-9:58; 13 Jul: 52 wks 
Sports Roundup; Sal 6:30-6:45; 29 Sep; lU 

w k- 

Galen Drake: Sat 10:25-10:30 am; 18 Aug; 

52 wks 
Mr. Mercury; T 7:30-8 pin; 3 Jul; 52 »k. 
Silver Eagle; Th 7:30-8 pm; 5 Jul; 52 vk- 
Jay Stewart Show; F 4-4:05 pni; 6 Jul; 13 wks 

Grantland Rice: Fri 8:00-8:15 pm; 28 Sep; 

8 wks 
Bill Stern: Fri 10:30-10:15 pm ; 7 Dec; 26 wks 



I i 



tikie Laine; Sun 4:30-5:00 pm; 7 Oct; 39 



2. Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Allis Chalmers 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 

Kraft Foods Co 

R.C.A. 

Rexall Drug Co 

Sterling Drug Co 



Burke & Gittc 

Ted II. ii. - 



Needham, Loui 

Brorby 
J. Walter Thompson 

BBDO 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 



M.I 



NBC 168 

CBS 149 

NBC 154 

NBC 167 

CBS 185 

ABC 215 



Nat'l Farm & Home Hour; Sat 1:00-1:30 pm : 

8 Sep ; 52 wks 
Our Miss Brooks; Sun 6:30-7:00 pm; 7 Oct; 

52 wks 
Great Gildersleeve ; Wed 8:30-9:00 pm; 5 Sep; 

52 wks 
Phil Harris & Alice Faye; Sun 8:00-8:30 pm ; 

30 Sep; 52 wks 
Amos & Andy; Sun 7:30-8:00 pm; 30 Sep; 

52 wks 
My True Story; M-F 10:00.10:25 am; 13 Jul; 

52 wks 



3. New National Spot Radio Business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Monticello Drug Co 



C. W. Hoyt Co 
(NY) 



25-50; Southern market- 



1-niin anncmts; 1 Oct; 
mos 



4. Natiottai Broadcast Sales Executives 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Harold W. Baker 
Norman Boggs 
Fdward Carlin 
Dale Drake 
Clinton H. Fowler 
Ward Glenn 
Frank Gonzales 
Gordon Gray 



Homer O. Griffith 
Ernest liartman 
William H. Hylan 
Ward I). Ingrim 
Richard E. Jones 

Tom W. Judge 
Stanton P. Kettler 

Reynold R. Kraft 
Ted Lazarus 
Harold Lindley 
Harold C. Lund 
Gloria Markoff 
Howard S. Meighan 



WOW, Omaha, news director 

WMCA, N.Y., vp-gen mgr 

Radio consultant, N.Y. 

WRR. Dallas, managing dir 

KLOA, Siloam Springs. Ark., asst mgr 

WIRE. Indianapolis, announcer 

Morris-Timbres Inc, Mobile, prod work 

WIP. Phila.. vp 



KAFP. Petaluma. Cal., comml mgr 

WNEW. N.Y.. prod, staff 

CBS-TV, N.Y.. acet exec 

Don Lee, III, v., I sis vp 

WJBK. WJBK-TV, Detroit, managing dir 

WBZ-TV. Boston, m mber sis staff 
WCRS. Miami. Fla.. managing dir 

Paul H. Raymer Co. N.Y., tv mgr 
Donahue & Coe. N.Y., acet exec 
Headley-Reed Co, Hlwyd., mgr 
Walker & Downing. Pittsb., vp 

KLX. li ,1.1. i,, I program dept 
CBS. vp, gen exec 



WSM. Nashville, dir news & spec events 

Don Lee, Hlywd., sis vp 

WLIB, N.Y.. head research, uicrch, prom dept 

Texas State Network. Dallas, sis vp 

KGER. Long Beach, resilient mgr 

Same, sis prom-pub rel dir 

WLAC, Nashville, prom mgr 

WJR. Detroit: WGAR. Clevc; KMPC. I. .A. <C.ra> 

will head N.Y. sis, svc office for these stations 

eff 1 Aug) 
KBIS. Bakersfield. Cal.. comml mgr 
Same, prod mgr 

Same, as-t sis mgr in charge of color -1- 
Same, exec vp 
Same, also overseeing Northern District operations 

(WSPD. WSPD-TV, Toledo; WSM. Cincinnati) 

Fort Industry stns 
CBS Radio Sales, N.Y., acet exec 
Same, al-ii overseeing Southern District operations 

(WAG A, WAGA-TV. Atlanta) Fort Industrj stns 
Fort Industry Co, Chi., midwest sis mgr 
WMGM, N.Y . adv, sis prom mgr 
Il-R Representatives; L.A., vp-iugr 
\\ Dl V, Pittsb., mgr 

WTOP, Washington, asst -ale- promotion 
Same, pres, radio div. 



• In next issue: New and Renewed on Television I Network and Spot); 
Station Representation Changes; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 







Numbers after names 
refer to category in 
New and Renew: 

Norman Boggs (4) 
Gordon Gray (4) 
Richard E. Jones (4) 
S. P. Kettler (4) 

Reynold R. Kraft (4) 



Dlew and Renew 30 J till/ 1951 




4. National Broadcast Sates Executives (continued) 



\ 




Numbers after names 
refer to category in 
New and Renew: 

William E. Rine (4) 
W. B. Campbell (5) 
H. S. Meighan (4) 
Van Volkenberg (4) 
Adrian Murphy (4) 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Adrian Murphy 
Hobby Myers 
Norman J. Oslby 
William E. Rine 

H. Needham Smith 
Ray Seofield 
Louis A. Smith 
Durward J. Tucker 

J. L. Van Volkenburg 
Stuart Weissman 

Storm Whaley 
J ohn M. Wilkoff 
Pare Woods 
Cracme Zimmer 



CBS, N.^ ., vp, gen exec 

KDB, San Diego, comm mgr 

Don Lee, L.A.. stat rel dir 

WWVA, Wheeling, W. Va., managing 



.11 



WSAI, Cincinnati, account exec 

NBC, N.Y., network transcription sis 

WOR-AM-TV, N.Y., Chi., mgr 

Radio Department, city of Dallas, head 

of dept. 
CBS, N.Y., vp network sales 
International Confectioner, space sis 

dept 

KUOA, Siloam Springs, Ark., gen mgr 
W r COP, Boston, prom mgr 
ABC, Illywil., member publicity staff 
WXGI, Richmond, gen mgr 



Same, pres, CBS lab div 
KFMB, San Diego, comm mgr. 
Same, vp charge stat rel 

Same, also overseeing Central District operations 
(WMMN, Fairmont, W. Va.) Fort Industry stns 
WBNS-TV, Columbus, account exec. 
John E. Pearson Co, N.Y., acct exec 
Edward Petry & Co, Chi., sis mgr-tv div 
WRR, Dallas, managing dir 

Same, pres, TV div. 
WOR, N.Y., asst sis mgr 

KGER, Long Beach, mgr 
BAB, N.Y., gen sis prom 
Same, dir audience prom 
WCAV, Norfolk, gen mgr 



5. Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Fred Abrams 

Kenneth B. Bonham 

William B. Campbell 
Fred F. Drucker 
ET W. Gaughan 

Albert A. Hally 

Chester H. Lang 
T. H. Mason 

Virginia Miles 

William Paul 
M. R. Rodger 

Robert J. Schrecongost 

F. C. Suto Jr 

Albert C. Wedemeycr 



Emerson Radio & Phonograph Corp, N.Y., 

work in govt contracts div 
Emerson Drug Co, Balto., pres 

Young & Huh i. .nil. N.Y., mereh dept 

R. Gerber & Co, Chi., adv. sis prom mgr 

Avco Mfg Corp, Cincinnati, in charge spec 

activities Crosley 
Industrial Tape Corp, New Brunswick, N.J., 

sis mgr (Texcel tape) 
General Electric, N.Y., vp marketing director 
Aveo Mfg Corp, Cincinnati, sis prom mgr 

Crosley 
Business Careers Inc, N.Y., vp 

General Foods, sis mgr Post Cereals Div 

Avco Mfg Corp, Cincinnati, asst gen sis mgr 

Crosley div 
General Foods, N.Y". dist sis mgr 
Johnston & Murphy Shoe Co, N.Y.. adv mgr 
U.S. Air Forces, Lt. General 



Same, head natl parts-sis sve div 

American Home Products Corp, N.Y"., asst to 

pres 
Borden Co, N.Y., asst adv mgr 
Mason & Mason Inc. Chi., adv, prom mgr 
Same, eastern div mgr Crosley div 

Same, sis mgr industrial-commercial dept 

Same, vp public relations 

Same, western div mgr Crosley div 

Alexander Smith Inc, Yonker>, N.^ ., research 

supervisor 
Same, NY dist sis mgr 
Same, central div mgr Crosley div 

Same, Cincinnati dist sis mgr 

Stewart Hartshorn Co, N.Y., pub rel mgr 

Avco Mfg Corp, Cincinnati, vp & dir 



6. \ en- Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



Beauti- Vues Corp, Hlywd. 

Bellows & Co, N. Y. 

Ben-Gee Products, Oak Lawn, III. 

Better Bags, Inc., Phil a. 

Colonial Federal Bank, Phila. 

( Columbia Tobacco Co Inc, N.Y. 

Cynthia Andrews Inc, N.Y. 

Damar Distributing Co, Newark, N.J. 

Dictograph Products Inc, N.Y. 

Florida Citrus Exchange, Tampa 

Genera] Cigar Co Inc, N.Y'. 

Hollywood Maid Brassiere Co. Phila. 

I, :iu ben stein Mfg. Co., Ashland, Pa. 

Lever Brothers Co, N.Y. 

Mohawk Carpet Mills, Amsterdam, N.Y. 

Olympic Distributors Inc, L.A. 
Paekard Motor Car Co., Detroit 
Lydia Pinkham. Lynn. Mass. 
Prim Products Co, Boston 
Radion Corp., Chicago 

Ramfjeld & Co, N.Y. 

West Coast Soap Co, Oakland 

Wiggins Chemical Co, Cincinnati 



Nutri-Tonic permanent wave 

Wine importers 

Bean sprout balm 

Packaging equipment 

Bank 

DuMaurier filter-tip cigarettes 

Sing shampoo 

Damar household accessories 

Acousticon division 

Sealdswcet juices 

White Owl cigars 

Brassiere manufacturer 

Metal perforators 

Pepsodent brand products 

Carpet manufacturer 



Chlorophyll deodoran 


t pill 


Automobiles 




Vegetable compound 




Prim waterless hand 


deal 


Television antennas 




Food importers 




Powow cleansers 




\X leu- waterless cleai 


•fr 



llixson A Jorgenson, L.A. 

Benton & Bowles, N.Y. 

Srhoenfeld. Huber & Green, Chicago 

Adrian Bauer Inc., Phila. 

Herbert B. Shor Inc, Phila. 

Anderson A Cairns, N.Y. 

Fred Gardner Co, N.Y. 

Maxwell Sackhelm & Co, N.Y. 

Walter MeCreery Inc, N.Y. 

Buthrauff A Ryan, N.Y. 

Young A Kuhiram, N.Y. 

Herbert B. Shor Inc. Phila. 

Vflrian Bauer Inc., Phila. 

McCann-Erickson, N.Y. 

Maxon. IVY., (all media but radio, 
which will hi' handled by George 
Boiling Co. t" years end) 

Knight. L.A. 

Maxon. Detroit 

Harry B. Cohen, N.Y. 

Copley, Boston 

Calkins X Holden, Carlock, Me. 
Clinton A Smith, Chicago 

Gordon Baird Associates, N.Y. 

Buchanan A Co, S.F. 

Associated, Cincinnati 



low many ad exe€'s 

realize that • • • 



". . . with 2 discs especially designed 
for promotions . . . for premiums" 



i-inch PROMOTER— 78 rpm 

jer messages up to 3 minutes and 

)nds per side. Like the SPINNER, 

lable plastic with true-to-life 

ion — a product of the finest 

ctor sound-reproduction techniques. 

jr way to get attention and individual 

1 identification. 



"... and for spots or 
complete programs" 





The 6 1 / 2 -inch SPINNER— 78 rpm 

a powerful little salesman, 
one minute and 40 seconds per 
side, that puts the impact of 
sound into your sales message. 
As personal as a visit, as mailable 
as a letter . . . gets your message 
to distributors, retailers or con- 
sumers — and gets it across! 
Smart merchandisers are also using 
SPINNERS to create lively, 
entertaining premiums with a clever 
sales twist. 




The 12- or 16-inch TRANSCRIPTION 
— 33V3 rpm to carry program material 
of every description — from spot announce- 
ments to full-length shows. Recorded, 
processed and pressed in the country's 
best-equipped studios and plants. 
World-famous RCA Victor engineering 
for every transcription order, large 
or small. Complete, transcribed radio 
production and script-writing facilities 
are available. 




Custom Record Sales 



"Your best bet: contact 
an RCA Custom Record 
Sales office today!" 

Dept. 8C: 

630 Fifth Avenue 
New York 20, New York 
JUdson 2-5011 

445 North Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago 11, Illinois 
WHitehall 4-3215 

1016 North Sycamore Avenue 
Hollywood 38, California 
Hillside 5171 

SEND FOR FREE BOOKLET! 

It's called "I NEVER KNEW"— 
and tells the whole story of 
Custom Record Sales . . . describes 
the amazing variety of services 
this division of RCA Victor is 
prepared to offer you. You'll 
want to keep a copy at your desk. 
You'll find it a valuable tool. 




«^fc 



Radio Corporation of America RCA Victor Division 



SELL 



Off 



, the impor- 
ience has the 
habit because 
on WRNL 
gives listeners 
t to hear . . . 
iritative news, 
or all tastes, 
a. mystery, 
ke a second 
e tacts . . . 
schedule . . . 
E SALES! 




NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
EDWARD PETRY & CO, INC. 




fcSpBff 



I -, 



Hurry W. Guppy 

Pacific Coast Manager 
Fhnters Nut & Chocolate Co., Inc., San Francisco, Cal. 

Harry Guppy did a lot of moving around in his youth. From Mich- 
igan to Montana, back to Michigan, and on to California by the 
time he was 13. Attending the University of California brought him 
to the Bay area, and Harr\ has spent most of his time there since 
graduation in 1925. 

Harry made his way through his junior year by selling books. 
After college, a succession of jobs led to Fuller brushes. Although 
he led in sales during most of his tenure, there was one tough cus- 
tomer Harry couldn't sell. But after two and one-half years he 
finallv did. The lady asked why he was selling brushes and ended 
by sending him to see her husband, E. H. Jenanyan, then in charge 
of sales for Planters. Jenanyan hired Guppy to sell peanuts in 1933; 
he has been with Planters ever since. 

After three years of selling in Los Angeles and Oakland. Guppy 
handled sales detail work; then took over shipping. During the war 
he handled priorities and allocations and became Pacific Coast man- 
ager in 1947 in charge of 11 Western states plus export business. 

National advertising is carried with the Eastern organization, but 
the West Coast organization has a separate budget for special adver- 
tising. Most of this budget goes to sponsor Edward R. Murrow and 
the News over 17 stations of the Columbia Pacific network twice a 
week; cost about $900 plus talent for the two weekly shows. 

Announcements are used in various areas in connection with spe- 
cial promotions. Typical have been recent campaigns in San Bernar- 
dino, Fresno, Sacramento, and San Jose. A sample schedule ( San 
Jose) shows four announcements three times a week for three weeks 
over KFOK. The rest of the ad budget is spent on point-of-sale dis- 
plays and material to support retailers. Retail outlets are also en- 
couraged to advertise cooperatively on radio. 

Premiums are in constant use. with listeners invited to send labels 
and cash for nut dishes, Mr. Peanut salt and pepper shakers, or a 
Mr. Peanut bank. Planters likes to devote a percentage of receipts 
to advertising and increase it as sales go up; how to spend it is left 
up to the agency, Raymond R. Morgan Company, San Francisco. 
Planters' sales are 12 times that of the nearest competitor. 

As for Guppy. when not teaching people to ask for Planters he 
gets away from it all by going trout fishing. 



16 



SPONSOR 








Selling ^ <* is a personal matter. •• 




And sales come easiest when you sell through a 
personality people trust. That's why WCBS' 
new "star-studded station-break" plan is today's 
most effective way to sell your product in 
America's biggest market. 

Under this new plan, you can have your sales 
messages custom-cut to your product . . . recorded 
for round-the-clock use by WCBS personalities 
whose endorsements listeners rely on. 

Take Margaret Arlen.* Listeners buy the products 
advertised on her morning program (now 
sold out) because they rely on her endorsement. 
Now her familiar voice, delivering your 
station-break commercial throughout other 
times of the day, will get extra attention, 
will reflect the same confidence in your product 
that the audience has in Margaret Arlen. 

Moreover, WCBS "star-studded station-breaks" 
are available at one of the lowest costs-pcr- 
customer in all advertising today. You owe it to 
your product to get the facts from Radio 
Sales or WCBS — Number One Station in the 
Number One Market. 

W VDJ New York 
Represented by Radio Sales 

Columbia Owned 



h any of these / 





other WCBS stars: Tommy Riggs (and Betty Lou ), John Reed King, Harry Marble. Phil Cook, Jack Sterling, Bill Leonard. 



COVERAGE 

Sure... We've Got It 

BUT... 

Like the Gamecock's 
Spurs... It's the 

PENETRATION 

WSPA Has 




In This i 

Prosperous 

<^ ----- 

yo^ V 

BMB Report No. 2 Shows 
WSPA With The Largest 
Audience Of Any Station 
In The Area! 

AND... This Hooper 
Report Shows How WSPA 
Dominates This Area! 



HOOPER RATING -Winter 1949 

8:00 AM - 12:00 N 63.2 

12:00 N - 6:00 PM 53.6 

(Monday thru Friday) 
6:00 PM - 10:00 PM . . . 67.6 

(Sunday thru Saturday) 



GIVE YOUR SALES 
A POTENT PERMANENT HYPO 




Represented By: 

John Blair & Co. 
Harry E. Cummings 

Southeastern Representative 

Roger A. Shaffer 

Managing Director 
Guy Vaughan, Jr., Sales Manager 



The No. 1 CBS Station For 
The Spartanburg-Greenville 
Market * 



5,000 Watts -- 
950 On Your Dial 




> vie developments on SPONSOR stories 

See: "Mr. Sponsor Asks . . ." 

ISSUO: 16 JWy> i951 ( Fa!1 Facts), p. 176 

Subject : How radio can promote itself more 
effectively to advertisers. 

Some novel new pitches are being made by California broadcasters 
to ad agencies and sponsors, both on the West Coast and in the East. 

Don Lee, pace-setting Pacific Coast web, has unwrapped a plan 
known as "Local and Network Cooperative Advertising"' which is 
designed to bring new co-op advertising funds to radio. Basically, 
the plan calls for national or regional advertisers to pay the talent 
costs and part of the net rates of Don Lee radio shows. Then, local 
retailers in the 49 Don Lee cities and towns on the West Coast, Ari- 
zona and Idaho split up the remainder of the time costs. 

Says Don Lee: "Thus, the supplier makes it possible for his re- 
tailer to purchase sales-producing local radio advertising on network 
caliber programs at a fraction of the price they would normally pay 
for local programs." 

Actually, what LANCA boils down to is a kind of "network co-op 
show" venture, in which the national or regional advertising cuts 
much of the price to retailers by assuming all talent, some time costs. 
At last report, several West Coast agencies were interested. 

Meanwhile, the 58-member Southern California Broadcasters As- 
sociation has started on its own all-out campaign to "sell the values" 
of radio. Salesmen's committees, representing groups of competitive 
stations, are already out calling on sponsors and agencies with a 
brand-new, basic presentation. 

Behind this presentation is an extensive station promotion and 
general razzle-dazzle. On-the-air announcements, from eight-second 
breaks to 40-second announcements, are being used to plug such 
"plus values" of radio as 99 f /f of California and West Coast homes 
being radio-equipped, as well as 73% of cars. Other topics: aver- 
age and total hours of listening; comparisons between Southern 
California and other sections; radio circulation and the economic 
growth of the medium. 

Other plugs will show up in radio newscasts, interviews, corre- 
spondence, trade ads. direct mail promotion, publicity and promo- 
tional stunts, sales presentations. 

Coming up soon : a trip to the East by* SCBA director Bob Mc- 
Andrews to pitch the story directly to Eastern radio buyers. 

See: "Ad manager's hook shelf" 

Issue: 6 November 1950, p. 32 

Subject: Worthwhile hooks for husy ad 
managers 

This year marks the 77th anniversary of Marconi's birth (25 April 
1874) and the 50th anniversary of the first transatlantic wireless sig- 
nal (12 December 1901 i. To commemorate these two occasions. 
Orrin E. Dunlap, Jr.. has privately printed a 21 -page pamhplet called 
"Writing the Biography of Marconi." 

Dunlap, a member of the executive staff and a vice president of 
the Badio Corporation of America, is the author of "Marconi, The 
Man and His Wireless" first published in 1937 by the Macmillan 
Company just three months before Marconi's death. For those who 
haven't read the Marconi biography, this 21-page tribute to the 
man gives a quick picture of the sin. hard working inventor. De- 
tailed, too. are the problems of writing the Marconi story faced by 
Dunlap. 




18 



SPONSOR 



„,. SALES 
MANAGER 



FEATURE your FOODS IN PHILADELPHIA.. 

with the KYW "Feature Foods" Plan! It's the plan that's giving food sales such 
a terrific jolt in eastern Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey. And it's not only 
a popular radio program on this 50,000-watt station. It's a ready-made merchan- 
dising package that wraps up and delivers the results you want! Just look at these 
big features of "Feature Foods" — 



POINT-OF-SALE CONTACT., handled by a trained corps of food product mer- 
chandisers. Here's added strength for your sales organization, in a group that 
actually gets orders and promotes re-orders! 

PIN-POINT PROMOTIONS in top-flight stores. Retail cooperation is guaranteed., 
not only in retail advertising by the stores, but in distribution of your literature. 

REGULAR REPORTS to advertisers. You get on-the-spot information as to 
distribution, out-of-stock conditions, shelf position, product exposure, competitive 
products, rate of sale, and specific promotional aids. 



No wonder "Feature Foods" is practically SOLD OUT! As this is written, 35 of 
the available 36 participations are working for many of the nation's leading food 
advertisers. The odds are 35 to 1 that your product will be a sell-out too. . if you 
grab the telephone now and get in on the deal. Call KYW or Free & Peters! 



KYW 



PHILADELPHIA 

50,000 WATTS 
NBC AFFILIATE 




1t/e4,ti*taUaude Radio- £tatio+U 9*tc 

WBZ • WBZA • KDKA • WOWO • KEX • KYW • WBZ-TV 

National Representatives, Free & Peters, except for WBZ-TV; for WBZ-TV, NBC Spot Sales 

RADIO - AMERICA'S GREAT ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

30 JULY 1951 



19 



r 




AND COMPANY 



DETROIT 
SAN FRANCISCO 
ATLANTA 
HOLLYWOOD 



RADIO AND TELEVISION STATION REPRESENTATIVES 






Top stars at low cost: names (like Walter Pidgeon) may tape multiple shows (as Rex Harrison, NBC) saving own time and sponsor's money 



What your dollar will buy 
on net radio this fall 

Ingenious methods, plain old-fashioned belt- 
tightening are eutting program eosts as webs 
drive to attraet new sponsors, win back old ones 



f __ j I' all. L951 shapes up as 

fffi jfflf the time of the great re- 

'" •' v appraisal "I network ra- 
dio. As a national advertiser, the e\ i- 
dence indicates you'll probabl) find it 
a more attractive media buy than it's 
ever been before. 

The carpeted offices at 30 Rockefeller 
Plaza, 485 Madison, and 1440 Broad- 
way have seen a flurry of conferences 
and floor-walking in the past few 
months. All of it adds up to a three- 
pronged drive to offer national adver- 
tisers attractive buys at the lowest pos- 
sible cost. 

This is how that three-pronged as- 
sault on cost works out : 

1. The recent round of rate cuts 
lops between 10', and IV, from time 



Typical economical package: Mutual's "Twenty Questions," formerly sponsored by Ronson, is immediately available at $3,500 weekly 



«" 



• f ^* 



M 



i 



*| 



O 



$m 



k 




OPERATION TANDEM ON NBC, INCLUDING "$64 QUESTION" TO COME BACK NEXT FALL, TYPICAL OF LOW COST INNOVATIONS 



charges, both day and night. 

2. Program package costs have 
been whittled down by an average of 
lS'/( — sometimes as much as 25', ; 
even 50/v in a few cases. New pack- 
ages are coming in at mouth-watering 
prices, averaging between $2,000 and 
$3,000 a week. 

3. Special sales schemes, like NBC's 
Operation Tandem and ABC's Opera- 
tion Pyramid, offer a flexibility new to 
network radio. Mutual has a brand 
new plan up its sleeve. Saturation 
campaigns, split networks, rotating 
participations, liberal frequency dis- 
counts are added inducements. 

Not all the activity has been restric- 



ted to pricing, however. Program peo- 
ple have worked up entirely new kinds 
of shows, shifted their blocks of mood 
programing around, done some re- 
arranging of individual program slots. 
A few samples: ABC's late-morning 
block of soap operas — many of them 
in serial form for the first time over 
this net. (Morning, by the way, is a 
prime buy on all the nets, SPONSOR be- 
lieves. ) NBC's new "realistic" drama 
with music, Pete Kelly's Blues; plus 
several new comedy stints. CBS's in- 
flux of new talent, like zany WNEW 
morning men Gene Rayburn and Dee 
Finch who will be on at night. Spade 
Cooley and his Western Swing show, 



Trends malting networks good bug 

1. Kate cuts and low -priced packages invite advertisers 
to cash in on lowest cost-pcr-tliousand ever offered. 

2. There'll be new talent, down-priced established 
stars, and a generally tightened budgetary oullook. 

3. Imaginative planning, reshuffling of hleck program- 
ing, and shifting of time slots makes medium more 
effective than ever. 

4. ABC's morning s;t.i|i opera strip. CBS 9 Western 
Stving, Mutual** heavy news coverage, and NBC's 
Operation Tandem are typical examples of the high- 
powered goings on at network headquarters. 



22 



and humorist Roger Price. Mutual s 
Monday thru Friday daytime sequence 
of hillbilly music, popular music, and 
audience participation programs. 

Over-all, you'll find an increasing 
emphasis on news, music, and mystery- 
drama over the radio networks. Music 
and mystery shows in particular will 
be even better buys than in the past, 
because of lower package prices. Asked 
how these prices can be knocked down 
without hurting quality and sacrificing 
audience, network programers listed 
these savings: 

1. Substantially reduced salaries for 
featured stars and guest stars. 

2. Scale or slightly over for orches- 





Pyramid, including "The Sheriff" (above), is set to continue this fall Mars buy of "People Are Funny" on CBS typical of new net flexibility 



tra conductor. Husky over-scale sala- 
ries have long been common. 

3. Writers increasingly paid union 
rates, instead of substantialK above, 
for scripts. 

4. Director paid less. 

5. Independent package producer 
takes a smaller profit. 

By paring down expenses all along 
the line, dramatic savings of as much 
as $1,000 to $2,000 per week have been 
made. 

That's the way network radio looks 
for this fall — from a distance. But 
when you examine the picture up 
closer, each net has its variations, its 
own special programing and pricing 



techniques. 1 his is how each looks 
under a magnifying glass. 

ABC The big news at ABC is its 
burning passion for daytime soap 
operas. ABC tried to lift several suc- 
cessful soapers from NBC a while 
back, but had no luck. So they've 
built some of their own and brought 
in packages from several independent 
producers. Up to now the net stuck 
to self-contained stories which could 
be told completely in one broadcast. 
This fall's crop breaks that tradition. 
will have many serial dramas as well. 

As Leonard Reeg, v. p. for radio pro- 
grams at ABC explained the trend: 
"An analysis of network programing 



showed no soap operas scheduled for 
the mornings b\ other networks — so 
we went ahead." 

The ABC line-up from 10:00 a.m. to 
12:00 noon on weekdays is a formida- 
ble group of soapers, interrupted onl\ 
once by Betty Crocker's Magazine of 
the Air. My True Story, still a self- 
contained confession-type drama, kicks 
it off. Since this runs 25 minutes, 
there's a five-minute slot left for Story- 
teller, a taped dramatic bit starring 
Edward Arnold and recently bought by 
General Mills. 

Betty Crocker interrupts for 15 min- 
utes and is followed by an unbroken 
{Please turn to page 76) 




2: TV-proof. NBC Monday block continuing SOAP OPERA: ABC thinks they're hot, is adding 4 soaps DRAMA: Escape entertainment still big on AM 



30 JULY 1951 



23 




CHAP STICK E.T.'S, LIVE COPY REACHES MEN AT BREAKFAST, [UPPER. ABOVE: A. E. PAUL GUMBINNER; ASS'T. WYN LEVINE 



Even truck drivers use it now 



In 1950. two products that men "just wouldn't buy" 

sold $4,750,000 worth to the male trade 







Irf Manager Bond 

Dynamo behind ■ Ik* revolutionary growth of 
Chap Slick, Chap-ans is 14-year-old (J. Ever- 
ett Bond, general manager of Chap Slick V.o. 
«iiicr I9.'i8. H»- joined the parenl company, 
Morton Manufacturing Corp., Lynchburg, 
Va., 193.'i. Horn Brownsville, Tenn., he is 
graduate of Princeton University 1931. In 
1 9.'i2-.'i.'i, he was associated with Doremus 
Ad Agency, IN. Y. He is married, has three 
children, is past president of Lynchburg 
Chamber of Commerce and Kotary Club. 
For reereation he likes reading and fishing. 



24 



Broadcast advertising is stud- 
ded with stories of sponsors 
who've successfully used the 
air medium to erase a social stigma at- 
tached to their product. Just a few of 
these arbiters of national taste are Tin- 
tair. which made home hair-dyeing re- 
spectable; Toni, which converted par- 
lor hair-curling into an overnight 
vogue; Odo-ro-no. which put a stamp 
of gentilit) on the under-arm deodo- 
rant ; and Turns, which created an aura 
of socially esteemed beneficence around 
the subduing of a belch. 

One of the most recent invaders in 

SPONSOR 



k 

to 
fa 
fen 
far 
ica 
pri- 
iia! 
nit 
ma 
oil 
ere 
tl-f 
noi 
lint 



to 

ECU 
KD 



RADIO of this special type 

will sell 'Chap Stick ' and 'Chap-ans' t o a wa iting market 

r w N 




These are the Market Areas from which 
our nation-wide Radio wiii emanate 

wbftrt !• tho»j«s deptftding up** availabilities;: 



Important Local Radio Personalities 
will tell the Millions! 



U.tJt. 

ATLANTA 

MWUNOHAM 

GH*MOtT« 

DALLAS 

n wotw 

LOUISVILLE 



OKLAHOMA OTT 
OCHMOMP 

TA**PA 



Control U.S.A. 


b»Mm USA 


Wtt»m U.S. A 


CHICAGO 


■ AlTIMOlE 


DtNVO 


CLEVELAND 


■OSTON 


LOS ANOELES 


CINCINNATI 


NEW TOUK 


PHOENIX 


DCS MOIN i i 


Philadelphia 


POITIAND 


eftnOH 


tOCMESTE* 


SAN FIANCISCO 


INDIAN APOUS 
KANSAS CITY 

MILWAUKEE 


SHINOFIEID 
WASHINGTON 


SPOKANE 
TUCSON 


MINNEAPOLIS 






AtTTlWWOH 


. 


i&Mb,. 


ST LOUIS 


/w%*a^*^ 


»/•» "fjtm 



,,.. 1 »fM* 



Mailing piece to druggists (large foldout type) stresses role of radio, gives sample commercials 



the field of revolutionizing mass cus- 
toms is the Chap Stick Company of 
Lynchburg, Va. Other sponsors may 
have been largely concerned with in- 
fluencing the mores of the American 
female. But Chap Stick set itself the 
far tougher task of changing the Amer- 
ican male's attitude toward two "sissy" 
products. Thanks in good measure to 
national spot radio advertising, it has, 
within three years, induced a great 
many men to accept as normally mas- 
culine the use of Chap-ans, a hand 
cream for men, and Chap Stick, an an- 
tiseptic lip balm. Both drug items are 
now No. 1 sellers in their individual 
lines. 

Exactly how much credit can be par- 
celled out to spot radio for the two 
products' Horatio Alger success is hard 
to say. Paul Cumbinner, account ex- 
ecutive for the twin items at the Law- 
rence C. Gumbinner Agency, New 



York, attributes radio with doing "a 
tremendous job of influencing and sell- 
ing for us." He points out that when 
Chap Stick first began being sold over 
the air in 1948, sales were about 5.- 
500,000 sticks of the 25(* item annu- 
ally. Now. about 7.000.000 sticks are 
sold every year. In the same year. 
1948, radio was first used to launch 
the 59^ Chap-ans to the American 
male. Sales have since built up "hand- 
somely," he says, "and more and more 
men are growing accustomed to using 
a hand cream." 

One thing certain is that both prod- 
ucts use more radio advertising than 
their competitors. Already, Advertis- 
ing Manager Everett Bond and Ac- 
count Executive Paul Cumbinner are 
planning their new, extended broad- 
cast schedule, to begin in September 
and continue until the season's end 
{Please turn to page 58) 




'Hack Berry," John Allen typical of morning talent used 




Jack Sterling was first breakfast-time d.j. for Chap 



30 JULY 1951 



25 




After-midnight 



WMCA's Barry Gray is typical of d.j. success formula on after-midnight air 



Pulse study gives sponsors 
, valuable data on who listens; many 
stations report sales successes 



spot 



Talk about after-midnight 
radio programing to most 
radio advertisers — and you'll 
get a blank look. Few sponsors, in- 
deed, are familiar with the facts of 
post-midnight radio selling, few are 
actually using it. Yet, these low-cost 
marginal hours are doing a top-notch 
job in selling products and services all 
over the country. Just look at a few 
of the examples turned up in a nation- 
wide survey by SPONSOR. 

Take the case of National Optics 
Company, makers of Ravex Night 
Driving glasses. This growing optical 
firm recently signed with WBBM, Chi- 
cago for a rotating series (midnight 
to 2 a.m.) of 15 quarter-hours on the 
station's Matinee At Midnight show. 
The pitch : a pair of Rayex glasses, for 
$1.98 plus postage and C.O.D. charges. 
Results: in two weeks, National Optics 
had booked 2,405 orders, or about $4 
in orders for every dollar spent. The 
contract was renewed for another 
round, and Matinee at Midnight went 
right on pulling orders at the four-for- 
one rate. 

In the Deep South, the peach crop 
was threatening to spoil in South Caro- 
lina, leading peach-growing state in 
the U.S., because truckers didn't know 
in which specific areas the peaches 
were ripening. The Peach Growers 
Association, in desperation, bought 
275 post-midnight I between 1 a.m. and 
5 a.m.) announcements in 20 days on 
\\ CKY. Cincinnati, during the Night 
Hawk Club record show. The pitch: 
all-night information on the exact or- 



26 



chards where the peaches were ripen- burgh, and from WNOE, New Orleans, 
ing, aimed at truckers cruising the to WDGY, Minneapolis, — report the 

same kind of results. 

Check over the lists of national, re- 
gional and large local advertisers using 
the after-midnight radio air and you'll 
see many familiar firm names and 
products. A few: Thorn McAn Shoes, 
Jeris Hair Tonic. White Tower Restau- 
rants, Sealy Mattresses, Rexall Drugs, 
United Fruit. People's Drug Stores. 
Robert Hall Clothes, and Helbros 
Watches, as well as many big appli- 
ance and auto dealers, restaurants, 
theatres, jewelry stores, banks, hotels 
and breweries. 

Check even more closely with these 
advertisers, and you'll discover an im- 
portant basic fact. Although many of 
them use announcement or participa- 
tion schedules all through the night, 
the majority of sponsors — and the ma- 



highways. Results: the entire peach 
crop was moved to market with little 
loss; both truckers and farmers bene- 
fited. 

In Washington, D. C, an enterpris- 
ing businessman named Tex Baker 
opened a little six-stool all-night restau- 
rant, and then sat back to await busi- 
ness. Practically nothing happened. 
Then, he bought a big schedule of (be- 
tween midnight and 3 a.m.) announ- 
cements on WWDC's all-night Yawn 
Patrol. Business started to flourish. 
Soon. Baker started up a home-delivery 
service, finally had to buy six jeeps to 
scoot around the nations capital to de- 
liver sandwiches and hamburgers. 

Unusual? Not at all. After-mid- 
night stations — from KERO. Bakers- 
field, California, to WWSW, Pitts- 




At night "Kennelly-Heaviside" layer (white arc) acts as reflector, sends radio waves further 

SPONSOR 




86.5% of late dialing in N. Y. is at home, reports WNEW survey 



Insomniacs swell late audience, patronize Lewis & Conger "Sleep Shop" 



jority of top results — are concentrated 
in the period between midnight and 
2 a.m. It is during this period when 
after-midnight listening to radio is at 
its general peak; thereafter, it slides 
downhill. 

Advertisers using the midnight radio 
air do so at a low price, even in the 
largest post-midnight radio markets. 
New York is a good example of this. 
There, WMCA maintains a spot an- 
nouncement (one minute) rate of $40 
for a one-time announcement between 
6 a.m. and midnight. Even though 
ratings take a definite jump (up 25- 
50' \ I on WMCA at midnight when 
the popular, much-discussed Barry 
Gray Show goes on the air from 
Chandler's Restaurant, the one-minute 
spot rate in Barry's show is still a good 
buy at $40 apiece. On WNEW, the 
usual minute spot rate is $60 (except 
for some special participation shows 
like Make Believe Ballroom), from 6 
a.m. to midnight; but the going rate 
for a single minute spot in the station's 
well-known Milkman's Matinee — one 
of the highest-rated post-midnight pro- 
grams — is only $30. WOV, which airs 



the Ralph Cooper Show from Harlem's 
Palm Cafe from midnight to 3 a.m., 
usually charges $25-$40 for a min- 
ute announcement during the day and 
night, charges $20 for a minute an- 
nouncement on Cooper's show — and 
considers Cooper the better buy be- 
cause of his big listening audience. 

In almost every case, sponsors pay 
considerably less for their after-mid- 
night announcement and program 
schedules than they do for comparable 
morning, daytime or evening schedules, 
on the basis of ratings, sets-in-use and 
price. Sometimes, an advertiser can 
even turn up a good buy like the pack- 
age of three announcements per night 
for a week for a total of $60 that's 
offered by Pittsburgh's WWSW. be- 
tween midnight and 3 a.m. on the 
station's 970 Club. 

Post-midnight hours are "marginal" 
time classifications — usually the last 
bracket and the lowest prices on a 
station's rate card. And, due to the 
fact that stations reach out further at 
night ( because of clearer atmospheric 
conditions, a longer reach with the 
'"sky wave," and fewer stations inter- 



fering), the after-midnight audience is 
often comparable in size to daytime. 
In other words, it's frequently a good 
far-reaching purchase. 

Viewed as a whole, after-midnight 
radio has made some strides in the 
past five years. According to figures 
of A. C. Nielsen, there has been a gain 
of some 2.5% in the total post-mid- 
night radio audience, covering mid- 
night to 7 a.m. (New York time) be- 
tween 1947 and 1951. Some losses 
have been sustained between midnight 
and 2:00 a.m. (the peak period of 
after-midnight radio), and gains have 
been made in the later hours. 

Why don't more sponsors use post- 
midnight radio? In some cases, it's 
because it just doesn't fit into an ad- 
vertiser's selling plans, and never will. 
In most non-user cases, the big stumb- 
ling block is lack of data. This is 
partly the fault of stations all over the 
country, since there is no network ra- 
dio operation at that time, and stations 
must carry the burden of proving the 
effectiveness of the medium. To some 
degree, advertisers are at fault, for 
(Please turn to page 73) 



ost-ntidnight audience, 1%. IV 



:cupation 



use wives 

srical & Sales Workers 

• nual Workers (all types) 

idents (not employed) 

!>fessionals, Executives 

vice Workers (all types) 

tired Persons ... _ 

employed 



% of total 



25.6% 
19.1 
16.0 
13.3 
12.3 
10.4 
2.2 
I.I 

Total 100.00% 



iurce: The Pulse, Inc., Spring 1951. 



\fter-midnight I7.S. listening, January 19i7 and 1!)51* 







Jan. 


1947 




Jan. 


1951 




Sets-ln- 


Jse 


Av. Radio 


Sets-ln- 


Jse 


Av. Radio 


N.Y. Time 


During Av 


Mm. 


Homes/Min. 


During Av 


Min. 


Homes/Min. 


12-1 a.m. 


9.9 




3,554,000 


7.3 




3,059,000 


1-2 a.m. 


4.1 




1,472,000 


3.3 




1,383,000 


2-3 a.m. 


1.5 




539,000 


1.5 




629,000 


3-4 a.m. 


0.7 




251,000 


0.9 




377,000 


4-5 a.m. 


0.4 




144,000 


0.6 




251,000 


5-6 a.m. 


0.9 




323,000 


I.I 




461,000 


6-7 a.m. 


3.0 




1,077,000 


3.3 




1,383,000 



NOTE: The use of N. Y. time is valid for nationwide checking, since 50% of the homes shown 
above are in the Eastern time zone, and 35% are in the Central time zone where the 
"midnight" pattern of listening generally starts an hour earlier than in the East. 

*Source: A. C. Nielsen 



30 JULY 1951 



27 



»1 





X V 



X 






sporting 
goods ignore 
the air 



SPONSOR analysis 

shows industry is 
missing good ad bet 



Amateur fishermen and 
hunters shelled out close 
to $4,000,000,000 last year for imple- 
ments of entertainment, according to 
a sporting goods industry estimate. 
Adding the take from wielders of ten- 
nis racquets, golf clubs, baseball bats, 
and similar sports equipment would 
make an even more impressive total. 

Yet, despite this very substantial 
pool of consumer dollars, manufac- 
turers of sporting goods are strangely 
backward in their advertising plans. 
Not one has a network radio or TV 
program, not one has a cooperative ad- 
vertising hookup with local retailers. 
The sporting goods industry is appar- 
entl) neglecting an opportunity to sell 
via the air which could be golden. 

Just why? These are some of the 
reasons advanced by leading sports 
goods manufacturers themselves for 
not doing a nation-wide, first-class, 
promotion of their products: 

1. There are so many different 
sports items put out by the average 
firm that it "just couldn't afford" to 
promote them all nationally. Spalding 



A SPONSOR suggests "torture tests" (as in Spald 

^H publicity picture) ere e natural for dramatized rac 

^ TV plugs. But industry hat never tried this appro* 




Spawmg 








PRINT GETS MOST SPORTS AD MONEY; AIR SPONSORSHIP INCLUDES TENNIS, GOLF, FOOTBALL ONE-SHOTS BY SPALDING, WILSON 



and Wilson, for example, two leading 
equipment makers, manufacture base- 
balls, golf clubs, tennis racquets, foot- 
ball outfits, just to mention a few 
items. 

2. Participation sport fans are 
spread thin over the country, require 
pinpointed advertising effort in sport 
magazines, next to sport sections in 
newspapers. One golf club maker puts 
the number of golfers at four to five 
million, with an average of four or 
five visits to the green a year for each 
player. He feels it's wasteful to reach 
this relatively small group of people 
via mass media, apparently had never 
looked into spot radio or TV. 

3. There are so many companies in 
the business that no single one is large 
enough to make a "big splash." In the 
general sports field there's Spalding. 
Wilson, MacGregor-Goldsmith, and 
Rawling. Fishing gear manufacturers, 
who have the most lucrative segment 
of sporting goods business, split the 
take five ways: South Bend. Pflueger. 
True Temper. Shakespeare, and Airex. 
Even with 25.000,000 anglers licensed, 
competition prevents any of the five 
from getting much of a slice. 

4. The traditional 40% mark-up 
doesn't leave enough "fat'' for a sub- 
stantial advertising budget. 

These may be sound reasons, as far 
as they go. But apparently forgotten 
by the sporting goods manufacturers 
is the fact that their market has bloom- 
ed saleswise, just in the past 10 years. 
A decade of higher living standards 



and sporting interests generated among 
former G.I.'s during World War II 
have lifted the sporting goods business 
into an unprecedented boom. A 
thorough. full-scale promotion of 
sports among average consumers could 
bring additional millions of sports 
fans into retail stores, SPONSOR believes 
on the basis of its analysis of the 
sporting goods field. 

There's been no such bold thinking 
in the industry, however. Instead, this 
is what manufacturers are doing cur- 
rently on the national level. 

Spalding lines up a special, hand- 
made network of some 35 radio sta- 
tions each September to broadcast ten- 
nis matches from Forest Hills. New 
York. A play-by-play description of 
the National semi-finals and finals and 
of the Davis Cup finals (when played 
in this country ) are broadcast all over 
the country. It's a natural for Spald- 
ing — their tennis balls are used in all 



matches, have been for years. 

Chief Spalding competitor. Wilson, 
similarly has sponsored the All-Star 
Baseball and All-Star Football games. 
The most recent broadcast activity by 
Wilson was its sponsorship of the Na- 
tional League Football Championship 
Game in December 1950. via TV net- 
work. Film commercials produced by 
Sarra. Inc. featured dramatic sport 
events from the lives of top athletes 
like Sam Snead, Babe Didrickson, 
Johnny Lujack. and Ted Williams. 

But Spalding's big push is a series 
of ''Sports Show'' ads, humorous car- 
toon treatments of famous or interest- 
ing facts about sports. They're drawn 
by cartoonist Willard Mullin. include 
such bits of information as: "A tennis 
ball has been timed at 85 m.p.h. . . . 
a puck off a hockey stick from 60 to 
80 m.p.h. ... a thrown baseball at 
98.6 m.p.h. and the initial velocity of 
[Please turn to page 65) 




Retailers have used radio successfully: Marshall Field, V/BBM, Chi.; Atlas, WWDC, Wash. 



30 JULY 1951 



29 




REPS SOLD FEW AM SHOWS, HAVE HIGH HOPES FOR TV/ BARNETT (ELAIR), KEARNEY (THEN KATZ, NOW ABC), BROOKE (F&P) 

What's your TV choice: spot or net? 

Reps, TV webs are waging promotional battle over method 
of airing filmed shows. Here are argument* for both sides 



MkftB like David winding up for 
jm ;i ■_■..< .< 1 shot at Goliath, sev- 
eral of the country's leading 
television station representatives have 
been flexing their muscles against a big 
targel lately: television networks. 

Unlike David, the station reps are 
firing off some pretty heavy missiles. 
The basis of the arguments against net- 
work television by the station reps — 
spearheaded by Katz Agency, Blair- 
TV, and Free & Peters — are interest- 
ing, factual and vers persuasive to 
network advertisers in many cases. 

Nmiii mln action, sales executives 
and promotion men at the four TV 
webs are beginning to argue back. This 
is to be expected, since everyone is 
playing for high stakes — in fact, for 
millions in future billings. The pres- 



30 



sure i- i:ro\\ ini* imciIci . mil less. Din- 
ing the interim period before the lift- 
ing of the TV freeze and the appear- 
ance of a flock of new stations, the 
struggle will probably be decided. 
The crux of the controversy is this: 
With over 60% of the country's 63 
TV markets served by only one TV 
station per market, clearing network 
time has become one of the biggest 
single headaches in video advertising. 
Few TV sponsors — live or film — get 
the kind of across-the-board time clear- 
ances they are accustomed to getting 
on radio networks. So far, the solu- 
tion has been to "go network" up to a 
point I the average is about half of 



'Besides abovementioned screening new film 
series for sjiot Bale, other representatives such 

us 1'i'lry mid Radio Salt's are hard al work. 



the total station list on major new 
shows) and then to proceed on a kine- 
scope basis. Here, however, is the rub. 

\\ ben you do this, say the reps 
blandly, you are actually buying a 
spot TV operation at network prices. 
The use of kinescopes on a limited 
basis is necessary and understandable, 
they add, but when time slots vary all 
over the board and networks are ship- 
ping some 5,000 reels of kinescope film 
each week, major network TV adver- 
tisers are already major spot TV users. 

Why not. reps add, stop paying more 
money for something you can't get, 
and switch film programs over com- 
pletely to spot television? 

SPONSOR, well aware of the confused 
thinking on this subject, herewith pre- 
sents a roundup of the latest available 

SPONSOR 



information. It is hoped that this data, 
result of an intensive check-up of lead- 
ing reps, stations, agencies, and net- 
works, will act as a convenient yard- 
stick against which an advertiser can 
measure his future television plans. 

Who's affected? 

The station reps are not wooing 
every advertiser on the TV webs. For 
many sponsors, even the reps admit, 
network TV is better — under certain 
circumstances. 

Since networks are much more ac- 
tive in packaging TV shows than they 
have been in radio, a number of lead- 
ing advertisers are firmly wedded to 
a network operation, whether they like 
it or not. Networks, by and large, will 
never give a sponsor permission to take 
a live or film "house package" — like 
Amos 'n' Andy on CBS; Lights Out 
on NBC; Breakfast Club on ABC; 
Magic Cottage on DuMont — and make 
a spot operation out of it. 

Live network shows are less a target 
than filmed network shows, because of 
cost factors. Even with cost-cutting in 
film production becoming an art, shift- 
ing a program from a "live" to a 
"film" basis nearly always costs more. 
And, due to the nature of the pitch for 
spot, a program virtually has to be 
already on film before spot's attraction 
can work for advertisers. 

So, who controls or owns the show 
is of top importance. Whether or not 
the program is now on film is vital. 
The real target for the reps is the spon- 
sor who is firmly in the driver's seat 
with his show (either through direct 
control or through agency control), 



Spot or network for your filmed program? 



Arguments for spot TV 

1. You can save from 10% up on your 
time costs by buying time slots on 
a spot basis. 

2. Due to the difficulty of clearing new 
network time deals, advertisers are 
to all intents in spot note through 
their kinescope operations. 

3. Even if a sponsor doesn't own his 
show or thinks the networks have 
them all tied up, more film pack- 
ages are becoming available, many 
through reps. 



Arguments for network TV 

1. Networks will not give an adver- 
tiser permission to take a network- 
created package and put it on a 
spot basis via film, and networks 
still have the cream shows. 

2. When you leave a network, you are 
dropping your franchise on choice 
network time. This will be increas- 
ingly important as time goes on. 

3. Advertisers will lose the promotion 
and publicity values of the network, 
as well as the network's prestige 
and acceptance, if they leave. 



and has it on film or who can transfer 
it to a film basis without adding tre- 
mendously to his costs. 

I inn- costs 

In the cost category, reps present 
their most persuasive arguments for a 
purely spot operation, or a combined 
network-and-spot program campaign. 

In a booklet, "Straight Thinking on 
Television Costs," published by The 
Katz Agency, Inc., last March this was 
pointed up clearly : "For the same time 
on the same stations, you pay up to 
19% less when you buy the period on 
spot than when you buy it on a net- 
work." 

It will be a surprise to many TV 
advertisers to discover that this is the 
case. When you buy network time, 
the rates are determined by the TV 
network involved. When you buy sta- 
tion time, the station is setting the 
rates. In the majority of cases, there 
is a differential — in favor of spot TV. 

Here's how it works out. A net- 



work's gross time charge for a given 
time slot is not merely the sum total 
of all the rate-card charges of the sta- 
tions involved, plus a profit for the net- 
work. Networks actually set an arbi- 
trary, theoretical "station rate" when 
quoting a price, and this is usually 
higher than the station's published (as 
in Standard Rate & Data) rates. Three 
examples with rates as of July SRDS: 
On WBAL-TV, Baltimore, an hour of 
Class "A" time costs $700 on a spot 
basis, $1,000 through the network; on 
WPTZ, Philadelphia, it's $1,000 spot, 
$1,900 network; on KNBH, Los Ange- 
les, it's $1,000 spot, $2,000 network. 

The Katz Agency points out in its 
booklet that time cost for a Class "A" 
evening half-hour, on a 52-week basis, 
was $671,580 on NBC's interconnected 
(35) TV stations. The same setup, on 
a spot basis, cost $563.305 — a saving 
of some 16%. 

(NOTE: These last rates are those 
(Please turn to page 62) 




5JL 

Filmed fare like "Bigelow Theatre" can make jump to spot video Network-built shows like Arthur Godfrey's have to stay put at networks 



30 JULY 1951 



31 




Stuart Chast> (above), author and 
lecturer, has written a score of books 
since 1925, mostly about the effect of 
science and economics on mankind. 
His specialty throughout has been the 
interpretation of complicated subjects 
and authorities to the general public. 
At 63, he is still actively writing away 
in his Connecticut home, still looking 
perceptively into the future of the U.S. 



How right was 
Stuart Chases \M 

prophecy on radio? 



Reader's Digest article had gloomy forebodings 
which haven't been borne out by the years 



Walter Patterson (below), v.p. of 
WKMH, Dearborn, has been actively in 
radio — with time out for Navy duty — 
since 1930. He has done everything 
trom managing stations to singing on a 
network show for Pillsbury. Radio vet- 
eran Patterson is due to take over a new 
station, WKHM in Jackson, Michigan, 
this fall, is still firmly confident of 
radio's importance in U.S. advertising. 




Not long ago, radio veteran 
Waller I Pat ) Patterson, 
vice president of WKMH, Dearborn, 
Mich., was rummaging about his sum- 
mer cottage up in Wisconsin. Deciding 
to catch up on his house-cleaning, he 
swept his hoary accumulation of yel- 
lowing magazines off the shelves and 
began tossing them into his outdoor 
fireplace. 

Then, while idly watching the prog- 
ress of the bonfire, he happened to pull 
a partially burned Reader's Digest of 
June. 1928, out of the licking flames. 
His eye caught an article, entitled "An 
Inquiry Into Radio/" It was written 
by Stuart Chase, the social economist. 
semantician. and literary Jack-of-all- 
trades. Patterson chuckled his way 
through the ominously prophetic piece. 
And he was so intrigued, he sent SPON- 
SOR excerpts from the ('base prophecies 
— wriltcn when the new medium was a 
lust\ infant but eight years old — com- 
paring litem with radio's actual status 
today. 

sponsor believes the comparison 
ought to arouse the nostalgia of old- 
time radio advertisers, the interest of 



newcomers to the industry. So here- 
with are Chase's forebodings, followed 
by Pattersons commentary : 



CHASE: "In January, 1928, Dodge 
Brothers brought out a new Victory 
model, and heralded its birth with a 
Victory Hour on the radio. That hour 
cost the motor manufacturers $60,000. 
or $1,000 a minute. Will Rogers in 
California, Paul Whiteman and his 
band in New York. Fred and Dorothy 
Stone in a Chicago theatre dressing 
room, and Al Jolson in New Orleans — 
all blended their voices in the biggest 
book-up ever attempted. 

' 'I am inclined to sit in admira- 
tion,' said David Belasco. 'of the mind 
which could vision such a stupendous 
undertaking!' 

"Some of us are not only inclined to 
sit; we are inclined to complete pros- 
tration. The event was unparalleled. 
The only question is whether Dodge 
sold any more cars by virtue of it." 

PATTERSON: "By examining to- 
day's network rate cards, it's interest- 
ing to note that, at this time. Chrysler 



12 



SPONSOR 



mm 




m*S 



\ # 6 



s^-*^y. 



1921: COMMERCIALS STARTED; FIRST WJZ STUDIO IN FACTORY LADIES ROOM. 1928: CHASE SAID "DIRECT" SELL WAS PASSE 



Corporation (Dodge) could get the 
vastly increased coverage of a truh 
nationwide audience — with a program 
featuring comparable artists for the 
same money. This — a happy situation 
indeed after 23 years of rising prices 
— remains about the only historically 
unaltered fact from Chase's article. 

"The question of whether 'Dodge 
Brothers sold any more cars by virtue 
of it' can be answered by the fact that, 
in 1950. auto companies in the U. S. 



Announcing the 

National Broadcasting Company, me. 

National radio broadcasting with better 
programs permanently assured by tbls im- 
portant action of the Radio Corporation of 
America in the interest of the listening public 






« hfMHtafj W*. .. 






Chase wrote 2 years after NBC was born in 
1926; but was gloomy about air possibilities 



spent $9,641,400 in network radio and 
TV programs."' 

CHASE: "The total annual broad- 
casting bill of the U. S. is $15,000,000. 
By whom is it met? Primarily by ad- 
vertisers. It must be worth enough to 
somebody, somewhere, to pay the op- 
erating outlay. Americans are not dis- 
tinguished for being in business for 
their health."' 

PATTERSON: "In 1950, the broad- 
cast industry's gross billings approxi- 
mated $676,000,000. An additional 
$83,772,000 was spent in TV— or a 
total industry figure of over $759,000.- 
000." 

CHASE: "Back in 1920, when 
broadcasting began, the usual program 
used to be a little music, a good stiff 
sales talk, a little more music. The 
eager fans, stupefied with the sensa- 
tion of getting anything — even a hic- 
cup — out of the air, were ready to take 
greedily whatever came along. 

"With the coming of better equip- 
ment, the radio audience began to lis- 
ten more critically. To hear a concert 
reft in the middle by a talk on gro- 
ceries was not too enjoyable. 

"Fans began to protest at the "pun- 
ishment.' And the big stations began 
to swing toward 'good will' advertis- 
ing. The A & P Gypsies no longer 
chanted of chainstore service. They 
did their stuff, and hoped the listener 



would not forget that the A. & P. was 
providing it. The small fry, however, 
still cling to the knock-down-and-drag- 
'em-out tradition. By spinning the dials 
a bit. you can still hear any amount of 
direct advertising." 

PATTERSON: "The 'little music, a 
good stiff sales talk, a little more mu- 
sic' still seems to be an accepted for- 
mula for broadcasting. The 'better 
equipment' and more critical listening 
have undoubtedly been the democratic 
l Please turn to page 70 I 




Royal Typewriter still promotes famous fights in 
dealer mailings; Chase in 1928 called it waste 



30 JULY 1951 



33 



HE 




©SPONSOR Publication* Inc. 



This is last installment of Herbert True "TV Dictionary /Hand- 
book/' Complete dictionary will be available in book form 




Contributors and Consultants . . . 

DR. CHARLES ALLEN, Research Director, Medill School of Journal- 
ism, Northwestern University, Evanston, III. 
A. H. BAEBLER, SR., St. Louis District Manager, Alexander Film Co., 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
WILLIAM S. BALLINGER, TV Producer, Campbell-Ewald, N. Y. 
BOB BANNER, Director, "Fred Waring Show," CBS-TV 
RALPH S. BING, Pres., Bing & Haas Adv., Cleveland 
WILLIAM J. BREWER, Radio-TV Dir., Potts-Calkins & Holden, K. C. 
CAROLINE BURKE, TV Producer, NBC-TV, N. Y. 
EARLE DelPORTE, Projection Supervisor, KSD-TV, St. Louis 
HARRY DIETER, Radio-TV Bus. Mgr., Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago 
MERWIN ELWELL, Art Director, NBC-TV, N. Y. 

HUDSON FAUSSETT, Director, "Armstrong Theater," NBC-TV, N. Y. 
WILLIAM D. FISHER, Radio-TV Director, Gardner Adv. Co.. St. Louis 
DON FORBES, Manager of Program Operations, KLAC-TV, Hollywood 
ROBERT GOULD, Prog. Director, WBAP-TV, Fort Worth 
NORMAN GRANT, Director of Staging Services, NBC-TV, Chicago 
KEITH GUNTHER, Producer-Director, KSD-TV, St. Louis 
ROBERT B. HANNA, Station Manager, WRGB, Schenectady 
SHERMAN K. HEADLEY. Dir. of TV Operations, WTCN-TV, Mpls. 
GEORGE HEINEMANN, Operations Mgr., NBC Central Div., Chicago 
ARTHUR JACOBSON, Program Manager, WNBO, Chicago 
LYN KING, TV Director, NBC-TV, Chicago 
LADESH, Producer-Director, WDAF-TV, Kansas City, Mo. 
GENE M. LIGHTFOOT, Radio-TV Director, Evans & Assoc, Fort Worth 
CARL LINDEMANN, "The Kate Smith Hour," NBC-TV, N. Y. 
CHESTER MacCRACKEN, V.P., Radio-TV Production, Doherty, Clif- 
ford 4 Shenfield, N. Y. 
DON McCLURE, Mgr. Radio-TV Production, McCann-Erickson, N. Y. 
IVOR McLAREN, TV Director-Producer, ABC-TV, Chicago 
ROY W. McLAUGHLIN, Station Manager, WENR-TV, Chicago 
HARRY W. McMAHAN, Exec. Producer, Five Star Prod., Hollywood 
HOWARD NEUMANN, A E Chg. TV, Lowe Runkle Co., Okla. City 
RAYMOND RICH, TV Prog. Mgr., WDSU-TV, New Orleans 
LEE RUWITCH, V.P., General Mgr., WTVJ, Miami 
BILL SCROGIN, Mgr. Service Dept., United Film, Kansas City, Mo. 
DICK STEELE, TV Coordinator, NBC-TV, Chicago 
BURR TILLSTROM, Creator, "Kukla, Fran & Ollie," NBC-TV 
GERALD VERNON, TV Manager, ABC-TV, Chicago 
WALTER WARE, TV Production Supvr., Duane Jones, N. Y. 
BEULAH ZACHARY, Producer, "Kukla, Fran & Ollie," NBC-TV 



34 



np««Jk Here's the fifth, and last, installment of Herbert 

| Iff rrue's 1951 "T\ Dictionar) Handbook foi 

Sponsors." It brings to 33 the number of 

magazine pages devoted to this up-to-date version. Bv 

contrast, the three-installment 1950 edition filled a mere 

seven pages — only one-fifth or so the size. 

The burgeoning vocabulary of television's technicians 
is proof of the medium's rapid growth. It's also a stead- 
ily rising hurdle to the uninitiated. What would you say. 
for example, if a TV director aimed this suggestion at 
you: "I think we should segue those two musical numbers 
to increase our spread — otherwise we'll run over." 

You'd probably agree if you knew the English trans- 
lation, which goes, approximately: "I think we should go 
straight from one musical number to the next without 
any break; this will take less time and give us some 
extra seconds leeway. As a result the show will finish 
within the allotted program time and not be cut off be- 
fore it's finished." 

sponsor has, it hopes, safely rescued its readers from 
any such pitfalls as the fictitious one above. For long- 
term insurance, send for a complete copy of Herb True's 
"TV Dictionary /Handbook for Sponsors." In addition 
to word definitions, there are valuable listings of such 
things as TV sign language used by directors, cameramen. 

The box at left lists TV executives who aided dictionary 
author Herbert True, who is himself a radio-TV writer- 
producer with Gardner Advertising Company, St. Louis. 



• The complete "TV Dictionary /] I andbook for Spon- 
sors" in book form will be available to subscribers on 
request. Price to others $2.00. Bulk rates on request. 



SPONSOR 



of a p 
of an i 

SCENE 
used ir 

meats 

SCENES 
ery is r 

in use. 

SCHEDl 

30 JUL 



{Continued) 

R.P.M. Revolutions per minute. A 
phonograph record revolves at 78 
r.p.m, a transcription at 33% r.p.m. 

RUN OVER ( 1 ) When a show goes past 
the scheduled time for ending. (2) To 
review, retake or re-rehearse a portion 
of a scene, situation, or show. 

RUN THROUGH Usually the first com- 
plete rehearsal by cast on camera. 

RUNNING SHOT Also trucking. Pic- 
ture in which the camera is dollied 
along with the talent or action. 

RUNNING TIME (1) The absolute tim- 
ing of a TV show or script page by 
page on last rehearsal. Running time 
is usually marked every 30 seconds. 
(2) Length of time a film or kine will 
run at its correct TV speed. 

RUSHES First prints from a film usu- 
ally developed overnight so producer or 
client can examine film production of 
previous day. 

RWG Radio Writers - Guild. 



SAMPLE Used to denote a representa- 
tive segment of TV homes or viewers 
whose TV tastes, opinions, and habits 
are taken as representative of all such 
families or viewers in the area selected 
for examination. 

SANNER DOLLY Also type used by 
ABC -TV known as Huston crane cam- 
era. Very finest TV crane arm or boom 
type dolly which has boom arm ap- 
proximately 9' in length, rotates freely 
through a full 360° horizontal circle, 
full 360° pan and tilt circle; obviously 
extremely versatile. ( Horizontal direc- 
tions are usually given by hour: 9 
o'clock, right angle left of dolly; 12 
o'clock, straight out from dolly; ele- 
vated directions by degrees: 1,000, 
highest elevation, 0, on the floor). 

SCAN or SCANNING The electronic 
analysis of the optical TV image into 
a series of parallel horizontal lines 
traced from left to right in sequence 
from top to bottom. 

SCENARIO A script or idea breakdown 
for a TV show describing story and 
action. Usually applies to a TV film 
rather than live show. 

SCENE (DA single sequence in a TV 
show which may consist of one or more 
shots. <2) The setting for the action 
of a play or situation. <3> A division 
of an act, play, or show. 

SCENE SHIFTING Various techniques 
used in changing locales or time ele- 
ments of a play. 

SCENERY DOCK Place where TV scen- 
ery is received and/or stored when not 
in use. 

SCHEDULE <1) TV or radio station 



timetable. All live, film commercial and 
sustaining TV operations are governed 
by the schedule. (2) A complete TV or 
radio broadcasting and promotional 
campaign. 

SCHIZOPHRENIC Occupational buga- 
boo where TV talent or personnel has 




two or more rehearsals or shows sched- 
uled at the same time. 

SCHMALZ IT A command by the TV 
director to talent and/or orchestra to 
do show or scene in super-sentimental 
style. 

SCHUFFTAN PROCESS Famous movie 
technique of shooting action on a set, 
only part of which is constructed in 
full size, the remainder being con- 
structed in miniature and photo- 
graphed in a mirror. 
Also Dunning Process: Another device 
originated in movies < adapted to TV) 
for combining the performance of an 
actor in a studio with a background 
filmed elsewhere. In film a yellow- 
toned positive print of the background 
scene is threaded into the camera in 
front of a panchromatic negative, and 
the actors, lit with a yellow light, per- 
form in front of a brightly-lit purple- 
blue backing; since the blue is comple- 
mentary to the yellow, wherever blue 
light from the backing meets the yel- 
low-toned film it is absorbed in pro- 
portion to the density of the yellow, 
and a print of the yellow image is thus 
recorded in reverse on the negative; 
wherever the actors move in front of 
the backing, however, they prevent 
blue light from reaching the film, their 
own yellow-lit figures recording in its 
place. (In TV a new technique known 
as Vistascope.) 

Vistoscope: An optical device contained 
in a simple, box-like case which fits 
snugly in front of the lens of any tele- 
vision or film camera. Through its use 
and an 8" x 10" picture of scene de- 
sired, live actors performing on a bare 
stage or in an open field can be pre- 
sented to a television or film audience, 
either "live" or by means of film, in 
what appear to be settings duplicating 
any structure or scenic site in the 
world required by the show's locale and 
script. Leased through Vitascope Corp. 
of America, RKO, Culver City, Cali- 
fornia. See Vistascope and Telefex. 

IijCOOP To start pickup or image trans- 
mission late with camera shots, sound, 



etc. hitting the air after the beginning 
of a show, thus causing the viewer to 
miss the opening action, music, and 
lines. 

SCOOPS Large flood or kleig lights 
used in TV studios, usually 5 KW. 

SCORE Music for a TV show or com- 
mercial. 

SCRATCH PRINT A rush or quick print 
that is used for editing. 

SCREEN (1) Fluorescent face of the 
picture tube in a receiver or monitor. 
<2) A retractable backdrop or wall 
screen used in conjunction with a pro- 
jection-type background. 

SCRIPT Complete written guide for 
TV show, commercial, film, or kine. 
Synonym for continuity. Term gener- 
ally used in preference to scenario. 

SCRIPT GIRL TV director's assistant 
handling script preparation, clearance, 
editing, etc., and frequently timekeeper 
and prompter in dry runs and camera 
rehearsals. 

SECONDARY RELAY Use of second 
micro-wave relay on TV remotes where 
direct relay is geographically impossi- 
ble. 

SEGUE Pronounced seg-way. Usually 
the transition from one musical num- 
ber or theme to another without any 
kind of break or talk. <For video, see 
dissolve.) 

SENSITIVITY Measure of the ability 
of a tube or other TV equipment to 
produce a representative reproduction 
for a given input. 

SEQUENCE (DA complete scene in a 
TV production. »2) Main division of a 
show. (3) Succession of shots or scenes, 
action or music concerned with the de- 
velopment of one subject of idea. < 4 ) 
In a story film a succession of scenes 
which together form a single stage in 
the development of the narrative. 

SERIAL A show given in installments 
and telling a continued story. 

SERVICE FEATURES Usually daily serv- 
ices such as weather forecasts, time 
signals, some news broadcasts, usually 
on multiscope. 

SESAC Society of European Stage Au- 
thors and Composers. 

SET (1) The physical setting viewed 
by a TV camera. (2) A TV receiver. 

SETS-IN-USE The percent of all TV 
homes in a given locality whose sets 
are tuned in at a specific time, regard- 
less of the TV station being viewed. 

SETUP ill Location of TV camera as 
set up for specific scene or action. (2) 
Arrangement of the orchestra, cast, 
mikes, lights, cameras, props, etc. in 
relation to each other. »3) The place- 
ment of equipment, camera, lights, 
sound, and personnel for the best TV 
picture and pickup of action. 

(Please turn to page 47) 



30 JULY 1951 



35 





K) 



I 



O O 



Iloir can a low-budget advertiser use TV 
effectively? 



F. E. Magenheimer 



Director, of Sales and Advertising 

Mason, Au & Magenheimer Confectionery Mfg. Co. 

Mineola, L. I., N. Y. 



The 

picked panel 

answers 

Mr. Magenheimer 







Mr. Moody 



It has been our 
experience that 
the low-budget 
advertiser must 
first be complete- 
ly sold on the 
possibilities o f 
television so that 
he will enter the 
medium with con- 
fidence. We try 
to make even the 
smallest prospect appreciate that TV 
combines the sales-appeal of all other 
advertising media and then delivers 
the resounding plus of product demon- 
stration right in the home. 

We feel this indoctrination is essen- 
tial to the advertiser's future success. 
It prepares him to follow our basic ad- 
vice to all low-budget advertisers: Buy 
what you can afford, buy carefully. 
and slick with it. 

The low-budget advertiser should 
not make a gamble of television, should 
not "shoot the works," so to speak. 
Ovcrextcnding himself will create a 
temptation to abandon TV before it 
has a chance to prove its merits. He 
should therefore budget cautiously — 
staying on the low side rather than 
the high. 

lie should then spend I li< isc lew dol- 
lars as carel'ull\ as though he were 
spending much larger sums. If neces- 
sary he should shop for just the right 
spot and he patient until the proper 
I \ opportunity comes along. To illus- 
trate. WHIO-TV carries one announce- 
ment per week for a bicycle repair shop 



at a cost of $27.50. Small potatoes? 
On the contrary, very big potatoes — 
because the announcement follows In- 
vitation to Youth, a very popular 
youngsters' program viewed by the 
bicycle-travelling public. The re- 
sponse has been excellent — the client 
satisfied. 

A local ice cream company, follow- 
ing the advice to buy within its means 
and to buy carefully, waited a year 
before selecting a good live show at 
the right hour to attract a large chil- 
dren's audience. The weekly budget 
is now $134 per week, the mail-in is 
large, the program is a success, the 
client is satisfied and a continuous 
user of television selling. 

At least a dozen other examples 
might be cited proving the importance 
of adroit program selection at an ex- 
penditure well within the advertiser's 
means. 

At WHIO-TV we regard advertisers 
spending between $200 and $250 per 
week as small-budget clients. But we 
urge them — and would urge all ad- 
vertisers whose budgets are moderate 
— to think of their expenditures as big 
and important money. They should 
select carefully, whether they buy Si's, 
participations, announcements, inex- 
pensive film or live shows. And then 
they should stick at it to give their TV 
money time to work. Given that time, 
it will work. 

A final example provides proof of 
this. A Dayton building and loan 
association bought the first commercial 
announcement ever carried on WHIO- 
TV. They use lively, inexpensive film 
commercials and. through the months, 
have constantly shopped our availabili- 
ties for more or better availabilities. 
Today, they possess some of the finest 
lime on the station, spend an average 




of $220 per week, and are one of the 
strongest advocates of television in this 
area. They have consistently followed 
the best advice that can be given to 
any low-budget advertiser: Buy what 
you can afford, buy carefully, and then 
stick with it. 

Robert Moody 
Manager 
WHIO-TV 
Dayton, Ohio 



It is no longer 
necessary for a 
low - budget ad- 
vertiser to buy 
inferior program- 
ing with which 
to buck either his 
local competition 
or the national 
competitor in his 
community. He 
has available a 
top-grade, flexible tool in filmed-syn- 
dicated "open end" programs, which 
have long ago proven their potency as 
sales weapons. 

Available to the local advertiser for 
exclusive use in his market area are 
programs such as Boston Blackie and 
Cisco Kid, priced realistically yet fea- 
turing the utmost in production values 
and entertainment. 

Because of its flexibility, an "open 
end" filmed show can be aired on the 
most advantageous day and most ad- 
vantageous hour in order to build a 
maximum viewing audience for the 
sales message. Rating-wise such pro- 
grams have had an immense pull city- 
by-city. Local advertisers throughout 
the nation have realized great success 
through their use of filmed-syndicated 
shows which are priced in accordance 



Mr. Sinn 



B8 



SPONSOR 



with the size of the market area, pro 
duction budgets of shows, and other 
logical factors. 

As the industry has grown, we have 
been able to secure the highest calibre 
actors, writers, directors, and techni- 
cians. There is no need to apologize 
for the quality of filmed programing 
as evidenced by the fact that the entire 
industry is heading toward the direc- 
tion of filmed shows. 

Both the national advertiser who has 
limited funds to spend in specific cities 
and/or areas, as well as the local ad- 
vertiser who must keep a step ahead of 
his competition, have been making ef- 
fective use of filmed-syndicated shows 
to do the job. 

John L. Sinn 

President 

Ziv Television 
Programs Inc. 

New York 



The greater Los 
Angeles area, 
which now boasts 
one million re- 
ceivers, is a gar- 
den spot for the 
low-budget local 
television adver- 
tiser. With no 
access to the co- 
axial cable, there 
is great emphasis 
on local programing and local adver- 
tising. And with seven stations active- 
ly competing for the local advertising 
dollar, there are more local advertisers 
on television than in any other city in 
the United States, and probably at the 
lowest cost-per-viewer anywhere. 

The major avenue for low-budget 
sponsors in Los Angeles has been the 
participating program, with emphasis 
on personalities rather than produc- 
tion. Programs featuring disk jockeys, 
news and sports commentators, and 
experts in almost every aspect of home- 
making such as cooking, decorating, 
and gardening, are doing a solid com- 
mercial job day and night. While some 
of the personalities on these programs 
come from radio, television here is al- 
so developing a group of new perform- 
ers of its own. Advertisers are finding 
that a friendly personality, once he or 
she has won the loyalty of the audience, 
can be a lasting advertising asset and 
can furnish extra dividends as a mer- 
chandising aid for the sponsor's deal- 
( Please turn to page 72) 




Mr. Moore 



I 



Three factors determine the value of radio 
advertising: 

Station's regular listeners 



Station's cost per listener 



Station audience income per capita 



These three factors must be considered together . 

Try every authoritative measurement on these 
three factors in relation to KVOO value and 
you will prove for yourself why KVOO continues 
to be Oklahoma's Greatest Station for the 
listener and the advertiser. 

Latest Tulsa Hooper shows KVOO 

again leads by substantial 

margins morning, afternoon and night. 



50,000 WATTS 



1170 KC 



NBC AFFILIATE 



TULSA, OKLAHOMA 

National Representatives — Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



30 JULY 1951 



39 



STRANGE ADVENTURE -fifty- 

two different fifteen-minute 

('ramus adaptable also to 
twenty-six half-hour programs. 
mystery and suspense 
guaranteed to keep viewers 
on the edge of their seats. 



HOLLYWOOD ON THE LINE 

— twenty -six quarter-hour 
simulated telephone interviews 
using the big box-office appeal 
of twenty -six big Hollywood 
stars to attract audiences for 
your sales messages. 

THE RANGE RIDER brand 
neiv series of twenty-six 

half-hour Westerns starring 
movie heroes Jack Mahoney 
and Die/. Jones ... ready 
end nailing to shoot the works 
for your product. 

VIENNA PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA- thirteen concert 
programs of classical and 
semi-classical music played by 
the uorld-renowned Vienna 
Orchestra, filmed in Vienna 
anil Salzburg. 

THE GENE AUTRY SHOW -fifty- 
two half-hour action dramas 
starring the greatest Western 
hero of them all .. .cheered 
by critics as "one of the hottest 
film packages in TV" and 
"wonderful news for TV fans." 

THE WORLD'S IMMORTAL 
OPERAS seven popular 
operas carefully edited for 
half-hour programming, with 
internationally famous 
voices; main programs with 
commentary by Olin Downes. 

BARBER OF SEVILLE 

-the full -length opera with 
Metropolitan Opera stars 
Ferruccio Tagliavini and Italo 
Tajo in the leading roles, 
mid commentary by 
the noted Deems Taylor. 

CASES OF EDDIE DRAKE 

thirteen half-hour mystery 
programs with Don Haggerty 
i "Command Decision," 
"< -anadian I'acific") as rough 
'a' ready Eddie Dial.' and 
Patricia \l orison of "Kiss Me 
Kate" as his girl friend. 

holiday in paris thirteen 

half-hour musical variety 
programs produced in Paris 
especially for television, with 
continental and Broadway 
musical < omedy stai Dolores 
Gray as the leading lady. 



You oughc 




o 



In television, the picture's the thing to catch your 
customers' eyes. And we've got the pictures to make 
you (and your commercials) look good— a large 
and growing library of high-quality film programs 
custom-built for television. 

It doesn't matter what product you sell. Or which 
TV markets you aim to cover. Any one (or all) 
of these Radio Sales TV Productions can help you 
stand out in television fast and economically. 

Since each series is subject to prior sale in each 
market, better call soon for more information 
and a look-see. 

RADIO SALES 

Radio and Television Stations Representative ... CBS 





illu'o o o 



by BOB I Ulll >l \\ 



Among the myriad items that serve 
to confuse me in television, there's the 
(seemingly) simple question: is it 
cheaper to buy a group of channels 
locally or on the network? Last week, 
faced with this query, I received a two- 
color bulletin from the Katz folks, who 
represent a number of channels. They 
maintain that you can save 19% by 
purchasing your time from the chan- 
nels themselves rather than through a 
network. 

What gave me pause to ponder was 
(a) Katz gave as an example of this 
local-purchase policy an account which 
I was close to that had just abandoned 
its local approach for the antithesis; 
i.e. moved to network; and (b) there 
was no mention of the cost of film 
prints which can run into real money 
(at about $40 per half-hour program) . 
True, it is possible to "bicycle" your 
prints; that is, buy a minimum and 
send the same ones from channel to 
channel. But, from my experience, this 
staggers more than the schedule; it 
staggers everyone: advertiser, agency, 




PRODUCT: Heed (Pharma-CraU Corp.) 
AGENCY: Ruthrautt & Ryan, N. Y. 
PROGRAM: Announcements 

TV, being more graphic than radio, offers 
boundless opportunity to become repulsive 
when treating a subject such as perspiration 
(or "sweat" as they blatantly refer to it in 
the newspapers and other less delicate 
media). Somehow, a product known as 
Heed (I can see the meetings that were 
needed to settle upon this cognomen) has 
developed a hard-hitting approach to a 
danger-ridden subject without ever really 
stating what it's talking about. Heed resorts 
to the trite (in Ad-land, that is) situation of 
a lovely looking gal whose escort is less than 
batty about her. The reason is you-know- 
what. You-know-what is gimmicked up and 
paraphrased by a slick optical plus whis- 
sound-track that states "Because of 
that!" Since you-know-what is "that," the 
ad-wrilet- repeal it twice more compound- 



Station crew, et al, since you ve always 
got different shows on in different 
areas and your schedules never begin 
nor end at the same place. Your sum- 
mer hiatus, for instance, is a problem 
for an Eddington or a Jeans. And if 
you want to break a price-change or 
announce a new model simultaneously 
across the country, you might as well 
cut your throat because if you don't 
someone else will do it for you. 

My good friend (until 1 ask him for 
a half-hour in a one-channel market), 
Jack Harrington of Harrington, Right- 
er and Parsons, who knows his way 
around this business of selling local 
TV time, tells me the Katz story and 
figures are correct. Nonetheless, until 
I get more facts ( including a refutation 
of a bulletin from BBDO's timebuying 
staff) I still won't believe everything 
I read. 

As an addendum to the above — keep 

in mind that you've also got to have 

your show on film or the business of 

buying locally isn't feasible. And, of 

{Please turn to page 61) 



ing what they feared was obscurity into the 
fully obvious. 

The situation, casting, and dee-vice are all 
sound enough, I'm sure. But I can't recall 
even one tiny "reason-why" in the copy and 
according to the book on advertising that I 
read, "reason-why" helps to set a product 
apart from competition. As it all now stands, 
Heed may be doing too generic a job. 




PRODUCT: Gillette Safety Razor 
AGENCY: Maxon, Inc., New York 
PROGRAM: Boxing, NBC-TV 

For several years now, I've been laboring 
under the delusion that those Gillette cap- 
sule dramas were too contrived and thus too 
phoney to win anyone's confidence. In fact, 
I would make bawdy remarks when those 
boys on the poop deck, the explorer, and 
the epee expert in these 30-second epics 
whipped from location to bathroom. But I 



take it all back now. I'm just a cynical 
Madison Avenue copywriter who thinks that 
nothing but Indians live west of Tenth 
Avenue. The reason for this admission — 
and my drastic change of heart — lies in a 
bit of a personal anecdote. If you'll draw- 
up a chair, I'll spin my yarn. . . . 

I flew down to Baltimore the other day 
and when I climbed out of the plane I was 
informed my packages were lost. So I had 
to stay overnight with nothing to do but 
wait for the packages and make a depth 
survey of the local martini situation. That 
next morning I had no razor but an account 
man who was along (I'm never allowed out 
alone) sent a bellboy down to the hotel 
drugstore for a razor. Up came the Gillette 
job I'd been hearing about so often and I 
knew how to open the top, hook the blade 
on, and close the thing. I shaved like the 
gents in the films and, although I didn't win 
any girls, I looked as good as ever once the 
operation was complete. The moral being — 
I knew everything about the product the ad- 
vertiser had wanted me to — and I felt that 
I was equipped with an old friend when it 
came to the room despite the fact that I use 
a different product at home. Hence my 
change of heart, as mentioned. 




PRODUCT: Lilt (Procter & Gamble) 
AGENCY: Biow Company, New York 
PROGRAM: One-minute announcements 

Lilt, Proctor and Gamble's home perma- 
nent, has the good fortune to have as its 
spokesman Jinx Falkenburg in a series of 
films that are most convincing as well as 
appealing. Devoid of gimmicks either op- 
tically or in the sound-track, they make the 
direct approach of selling, relying upon the 
personality of the "announcer." In this case, 
she more than lives up to what is asked of 
her. For Jinx has poise and charm as well 
as the ability to put across a sales-story in 
a thoroughly intelligent way. Having worked 
with her, I know this to be the result of 
equal parts of native ability and headwork; 
in other words, confident as the lass is, she 
masters her lines which enables her to give 
the best emphasis to each sales point. I 
might also add what is perhaps unnecessary 
— she is awfully nice to look at. 

In one evening I saw two of the Jinx-Lilt 
series, and the one that used her solo, in 
contrast to the one with the blonde (and 
speechless) model, seemed far better to my 
mind. But there again I'm prejudiced since 
I think adding gals to Jinx is gilding the 
lily. 

The Lilt spots prove again, if proof is 
needed, that the more direct you are, the 
more the burden on your salesman. But if 
he, or she, has the ability to shoulder this 
burden — you're in business! 

(Next issue: Radio Commercial reviews) 






42 



SPONSOR 




News Editor Jack White's top-rated 
newscasts pull millions of listeners for 

Peter Paul, Inc.* Auto-Owners Insurance 
Co. and Michigan Milk Producers Assn. 

W r hite is heard at 8:00 A. M. 
and 12:45 P. M., Monday thru Saturday. 




-W * 




MICHIGAN 

listens... 

MICHIGAN 

buys... 



the 

GREAT 
VOICE 



Large listenership 

means large sales of 

PETER PAUL MOUNDS 

candy bars. 



of the GREAT LAKES 



By every standard of measurement, Jack While is Michigan's most popular 

daytime newscaster. Here's another example that quality 
programming is the sure way to listener preference. And listener preference, 
combined with WJR's dominant 50,000 watt clear channel voice, 
assures advertisers of intensive penetration of the market . . . maximum 
results in sales . . Remember . . First they listen . . . then they buy! 

Represented Nationally by Edward Pelry & Company 




Radio — America's greatest 
advertising medium 



30 JULY 1951 



43 




...for delivering listeners, SALES on 
your lively music ond personality show. 
Thanks to your "Katy Ellen" show, 
KTIN proved to be our best dollar buy 
in the Denver market"* 

'national advertiser's name 
on request. 

KTLN offers you prime coverage 
of the cream of the rich Rocky Mountain 
area, including all of the Denver 
market, with Koty Ellen and a host of 
other programs slanted to the 
housewife. KTLN is non-directional— the 
LARGEST independent station in the 
largest market without television. 

for availabilities wire, 
phone or write or 

Radio Representatives, Inc., John 

New York, Chicago, Buchanan 
Los Angeles, KTLN 

San Francisco Denver 



KTLN 

1000 WATTS 

DENVER'S 

only independent 

non-directional 

station 



,0 °f^ 



f 




This SPONSOR department features capsuled reports ot 
broadcast advertising significance culled from all seg- 
ments of the industry. Contributions are welcomed. 



WHP frequency change successful promotion gimmick 

Stations planning on a frequency all downtown theatres; 5,000 postcards 



change can take a tip from WHP. 
Harrisburg, on how to get the most 
out of their promotion. And. at the 
same time, tie in with advertisers to 
share the publicity. 




Neat promotion marks WHP's new frequency 

Recently when WHP moved to 580 
on the dial the day of the move was 
proclaimed 580 Day with this heavy 
campaign heralding the switch: satura- 
tion schedule of announcements and 



announcing the move mailed to listen- 
ers; contests; free rides on Harrisburg 
busses at 5:80 p.m. 1 6:20) if passen- 
gers said "580'" when boarding bus; 
airplane balloon bombardment, many 
bearing lucky 580 tag (bearer collect- 
ed $5.80 on presenting tag to WHP). 

WHP advertisers tied-in with ads 
daily for one week in Harrisburg pa- 
pers. Typical ads were Miller's Fur- 
niture Store offering $580 worth of 
prizes; contestants simply filling out a 
card with winners determined bv a 
drawing held at Miller's. The station 
carried about 20 newspaper ads in 
Harrisburg, Lancaster, York, Lebanon 
and Columbia. 

Bowman's, a leading Harrisburg 
store, featured WHP's move with 
*'WHP's new dial-address. . .for finer 
entertainment at the twist of the dial 
... be sure to turn to 580!" 

So successful was the frequency 
change that Abe Redmond. WHP een- 



programs; bus cards; placards; a eral manager, was called Mr. 580 by 
movie trailer between each show in everyone he met on the streets. * * * 

Sponsor good trill recipe: performance plus pancakes 

A three-theatre farm show is the 
latest in sponsor promotion-goodwill 
efforts. Its novel arrangement: the 
collaboration of Centennial Flouring 
Mills Company of Spokane; their 
KXLY farm broadcaster, Ernie Jor- 
genson ; home economist Celia Lee, 
and three theatres in Sandpoint, Idaho, 
managed by Floyd Cray. 

The show, called Country Store, 
runs each spring; this vear's being the 
second in the series. Featured are 
amateur performers plus interviews on 
stage of farm folks with the interviews 
recorded and later presented on 
KXLY. The main performance ibis 
year was ;il the Panida Theatre with 
the goings on piped to the other two 
theatres. Jorgenson reports a packed 
house at llii- \ eai - session. 




Hot music and pancakes for KXLY listeners 

Climax of the show: pancake sta- 
tions are set up in the theatres with the 
audience getting them hot off the grid- 
dle: made with Centennial flour, of 

rnnrcp X w "w 






44 



SPONSOR 






Simutel enables sponsors to pretest TV shows, pitches 



Advertisers are now pre-testing and 
seeing exactly how their film shows 
and commercials look when received 
on a home TV set. The method: 
Simutel or simulated television; it was 
developed about a year and a half ago 
by Edward Petry & Company and is 
now installed in specially built studios 
in their Chicago and New York offices. 

Since the device was developed, some 
500 advertisers and agencies have 




Sponsors preview 



availed themselves of the tool, Among 
them: J. Walter Thompson; Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample; H. W. Kastor & 



Son; BBDO; Duane Jones; Benton & 
Bowles; American Family Flakes; Ekco 
Products; College Inn Foods; and 
Peter Paul. 

Andrew L. Rowe, vice president of 
Elgin Watch, comments on the TV 
testing situation : "We discovered early 
that direct-view projection on beaded 
screens gave a false picture — too much 
clarity, definition and illumination. . . 
a preview on the monitor system of a 
TV station didn't give the same effect 
as when the picture was actually aired 
. . .films run during test pattern time 
proved inconvenient, cumbersome, and 
difficult. 

"After a series of auditions, the 
Petry Simutel televiewer was found to 
be the best answer yet to pre-testing 
films. Before any television commer- 
cial film is released by our agency to 
TV stations we are absolutely sure now 
that we know what the film is going 
to look like when sent into the homes 
of America's television viewers." 

• • • 



TV stations countrywide get Washington news fast 



Local and regional TV stations can 
now get Washington news coverage in 
much the same manner that Washing- 
ton correspondents provide local news- 
papers with Capital news. The plan: a 
Washington television "news bureau" 
conceived by Colonel Ed Kirby, former 
Peabody Radio Award winner, and or- 
ganized by Robert J. Enders. president 
of the Washington advertising agency 
bearing his name. 

Enders says of the need for this type 
service: "Obviously the networks can 
no more provide local and regional cov- 
erage for their affiliates than can the 
wire services for their member sta- 
tions. And the independent station has 
an even greater need for this localized 
Washington service." 

The bureau, staffed with 10 camera- 
men and news editors, provides each 
subscriber station with a seven-minute 
sound-on-film coverage of Washington 
highlights, five times a week. Film is 
processed, edited, and sent by air ex- 
press, available for showing the eve- 
ning of the same day in most parts of 
the country except the Pacific Coast, 
which gets overnight delivery. Stand- 
by films are distributed in advance for 
days when bad weather slows delivery. 

A unique feature of the daily Wash- 
ington film strip is a 30 or 60-second 



cut-in by some Congressman, newspa- 
perman, or person prominent in the 
subscriber-station area. Subscriber sta- 
tions may also call upon the bureau 
on an assignment basis to provide spe- 
cial coverage. 

Cost to a subscriber station is at the 
rate of one-half of their Class A 10- 
minute time with a minimum of $75 
and a maximum of $250 for the regu- 
lar service. The films become the prop- 
erty of the individual stations and may 
be shown as many times as desired 
without further cost. • • * 



Briefly . . . 

Radio executives from stations 
throughout Louisiana met recently at 
a BMI program clinic held in New 
Orleans. The purpose of the clinic : to 
promote better all-around station pro- 
( Please turn to page 79) 





For your 16 mm. industrial 

film requirements 

use Precision . . . 

• Over a decade of 16 mm. in- 
dustrial him printing in black 
and white and color. 

• Fine grain developing of all 
negatives and prints. 

• Scientific control in sound 
track processing. 

• lOO^r optically printed tracks. 

• Expert timing for exposure 
correction in black & white or 
color. 

• Step printing for highest pic- 
ture quality. 

• Special production effects. 

• Exclusively designed Maurer 
equipment. 

• Personal service. 




PRECISION 



FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

21 West 46th St., 

New York 19, N.Y. 

JU 2-3970 



30 JULY 1951 



45 



quiz ft 



or 



TV 

(Ci 



economy 



-minded 



advertisers: 



Which of these film television shows are 
Spot Programs? Which are Netivork? 



ere: 



SH. 

vie 



All of these shows on television last season had lots in 
common. All were done on film. All had multi-market dis- 
tribution. But three of them (1, 3 and 4) were Spot 
program campaigns. 

This test ought to convince you there's nothing on the 
viewing screen that labels a show a "Spot program." Spot 
programs come live and film . . . come in practically every 
entertainment category ... in every time segment. The 
viewer just can't tell the difference. 

But your treasurer can tell the difference-because he 
saves money in television with Spot programs. Saves on 
facilities charges. Saves enough to pay for the extra film 
prints involved and their distribution. For Spot program 
rates are generally lower than network rates for the same 
period . . . over the same stations. 

And your sales manager knows the difference. Be- 
cause with a Spot program television campaign he can pick 
and choose the very markets he wants. In Spot program 
advertising there are no "must" stations . . . no minimum 
station requirements. 

And your advertising manager knows. He's a more 
profitable customer to the station. So he gets wholehearted 
station cooperation . . . finds that stations clear time more 
readily. 

Now you know, too. If you'd like to know more, simply 
call a Katz representative for the full story on Spot pro- 
gram advertising. Ask him how much money you can save. 
You'll see that . . . 

you can do better with Spot. Much better. 



1. The Bigelow Theatre 

2. Groucho Marx 
S. The Cisco Kid 

4. Wild Bill Hickok 

5. Fireside Theatre 

6. Gene Autry 

7. Horace Heidt 



E KATZ AGENCY, inc. 



Station Representatives 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT • IOS ANGEIES • SAN FRANCISCO • ATLANTA • DAltAS • KANSAS CITY 

46 SPONSOR 



TV DICTIONARY 

{Continued from page 35) 

SHADING Technical operation per- 
formed by engineer to eliminate the 
spurious signals from TV camera pro- 
duced by tube characteristics. Of great- 
est importance when using older mo- 
tion picture films due to their high 
contrast elements and subsequent in- 
creased production of spurious signals. 

SHADOWING To simulate by trick ef- 
fect a natural shadow that cannot ef- 
fectively be created through use of TV 
lighting alone. 

SHARE-OF-AUDIENCE The percent of 
viewers watching a given show or sta- 
tion based on the total of sets-in-use. 

SHOCK VALUE TV writing technique 
which utilizes visual prop, set, or even 
sound to attract audiences' initial at- 
tention to commercial, action or show. 

SHOOTING-OFF-OVER To take in areas 
in a given camera shot that are not 
wanted or that are beyond the hori- 
zontal or vertical limits of set. 

SHOOTING SCHEDULE Film term 
meaning the shots are not in the order 
in which they will finally appear, but 
in the most convenient shooting order. 

SHOOTING SCRIPT ( 1 ) Final TV script 
with all camera shots, lights, music, 
miscellaneous information included. 
(2) Complete film script divided into 
script-scenes and containing all neces- 
sary technical instructions for shoot- 
ing. 

SHORT VOICE A voice with a narrow 
or restricted range. 

SHOT A single continuous pick up of 
the TV camera. 

SHOW Usually the entire telecast pre- 
sentation or program. 

SIGNAL Any acceptable transmission 
and pick-up of TV picture and sound. 

SIGNATURE or SIG The specific title, 
picture, typography, theme song, mu- 




sic, sound, or catch phrase, or even tal- 
ent, that regularly identifies a specific 
TV show. 

SILENT SPEED Speed of 16 frames per 
second as opposed to 24 frames in 
sound film. The speed of silent film 
can be projected on standard machines 



SIGN LANGUAGE FOR TV 


Directions to Talent 


Sign 


Increase volume of speech. 


Move hands up, palms up. 


Decrease volume. 


Move hands down, palms down. 


Begin your action or speech. 


Point directly at actor or talent. 


"Stretch it out." 


Draw hands apart slowly, as in 
stretching a rubber band. 


Speed up action or delivery. 


Rotate hand, with index finger 
extended, clockwise rapidly. 


Hold present head position for 
camera. 


Hold palms of hands on face 
cheeks. 


Move head or body position. 


Move own head with palms of 
hands in direction and position 
desired. 


Move away from camera. 


Move hand away from face. 


Move toward mike. 


Move hand toward face. 


Cut, or stop speech or action. 


Draw index finger across throat 
("cut throat" motion). 


Move left. 


Swing own right hand — arm flag- 
ging motion. 


Move right. 


Swing own left hand — arm flag- 
ging motion. 


Avoid provisional cut. 


Tap head. 


Watch me for cue. 


Point to eye. 


Give network cue. 


Show clenched fist to announcer. 


Fade-out from set and make exit. 


Lower hands slowly, palms down, 
turn clenched fist slowly. 


Make entrance. 


Clenched fist, thumb up — to tal- 
ent direct cue. 


O. K. 


Form circle with thumb and fore- 
finger — other fingers extended. 


Questions, Answers, to Control 
Room, Stage Manager, Etc. 


Sign 


Is show running on time to 
planned time allotment? 


Crook index finger over nose 
bridge. 


The show, scene or action is pro- 
ceeding as planned. 


Touch nose. 


How much time? 


Point to watch on wrist, or to 
where watch would be on wrist. 


One minute. 


Hold up one finger. 


Tioo minutes. 


Hold up two fingers. 


Three minutes. 


Hold up three fingers. 


y 2 minute 


Cross fingers in middle. 


How is audio or sound? 


Point to ear with forefinger. 


How are lights, spot, or lighting 
arrangement? 


Cup hands at each side of eyes 
binocular fashion. 


Report to Control Booth 




or Stage Manager 


Sign 


Camera cables tangled — change 
camera blocking. 


Twist arms together, hands out, 
in direction of stage manager 
or control room. 


Grid, lights or mike too low for 
elevated boom camera shot. 


Hold palm of hand flat on top 
of head. 



30 JULY 1951 



47 



and will operate with the standard film 
camera chain for television. 

SILL IRON or SADDLE IRON Narrow 
metal strip spanning the opening be- 
tween the two legs of a practical door 
or fireplace flat to strengthen it and 
keep its measurements regular. 

SIMULCAST (1) A combination AM 
and TV show. (2) To televise a show 
at the same time it is being broadcast 
on radio. 

SINGLE SYSTEM Sound and picture 
recorded on the same film at the same 
time. 

SITUATION Synonymous with plot, or 
setting sometimes. Problems to be 
solved in a story or drama and the 
various characters' reactions to the 
situation. 

SITUATION SHOW To base a whole 
show or performance on the location 
or circumstances that exist at the 
time, such as the Alan Young Show. 

SLAP BASS Direction to musician to 
play bass violin by slapping the strings. 

SLAPSTICK Milton Berle, Jerry Lewis 
type of TV comedy relying on fast ac- 
tion, mugging, and broad knockabout 
humor. May frequently embody chases. 

SLIDE Usually refers to still art work, 
titles, photographs or film which are 
picked up or projected upon camera 
tube. Basically there are two different 
kinds of slides, transparent or opaque, 
the size of which varies according to 
station projection method used. 

Transparent Slide: also called transpar- 
ency, meaning light is projected 
through slide. May be 2" x 2" on a 
single or double frame of 35 mm. film 
usually mounted in cardboard or glass. 
Another size transparent slide is 4" x 
3y 4 " with a V2" masking applied on all 
four sides, and in this case all lettering 
and art work should be at least Va" 
from the edge of the mask on all four 
sides. 

Opaque Slide: also called Balop slide or 
card. Is solid, opaque (you can not see 
through it) and these are usually 
3" x 4", 6" x 8" or any over-all dimen- 
sion in the ratio of 9 x 12. No mask- 
ing is required, but all lettering and 
art work should be at least %" from 
outside edges on all four sides. Any 
photographs used in opaques should be 
dulls, not glossys. Size of letters on 
opaque slide 9 x 12 should be %" or 
larger to be received effectively. Opaque 
slides, lettering, etc. should have a 
background of Miller gray with poster 
white and any good black for effective 
video reproduction. 

SLIDE WHISTLE or SLOOP WHISTLE 

Comedy effect used to point up humor- 
ous falls or jumps. Has an ascending 
or descending continuous note. 

SLOW MOTION The slow movement of 
objects which are produced by filming 
more frames per second than are pro- 
pected per second. 



ab 



SMPE Society of Motion Picture En- 
gineers. 

SNAP (1) Descriptive term defining 
right proportion of contrast and sharp- 
ness in a TV picture. (2) Cue to pro- 
jectionist to change slides. 

SNAP SWITCH An instantaneous cut 
from one camera to another. 

SNAPPER 1 1 1 An extra incentive to 
get the TV audience to react or buy a 
special product. (2) The pay-off of a 
script. (3) The final line of a comedy 
routine. 

SNEAK Very gradual fades of music, 
light, sound, dissolves, etc., whose be- 
ginnings or endings are barely percep- 
tible. 

SNOW The flickering of small lights 
and dark particles giving the effect of 
snow on the picture. 

SOAP OPERA Serial programs such as 
One Man's Family, The First One Hun- 
dred Years, etc., usually sponsored by 
soap companies. 

SOCK IT Also hit it or punch it. To 
speak a word or line very forcibly. 

S.O.F. Sound on film. 

SOFT FOCUS Soft and slightly hazy 
effect obtained by shooting subject 
slightly out of focus. See out of focus 
dissolve. 

SONG PLUGGER Usually a music pub- 
lisher's representative who promotes 




his firm's songs to TV talent, stations, 
agencies, etc. 

SOTTO A direction to talent or per- 
sonnel to speak softly. 

SOUND Man: Technician who pro- 
duces, either manually, electronically 
or by recordings, ingenious and realis- 
tic sound effects. Table or jeep: A mov- 
able table for sound effect devices to 
be created in limbo. 

SOUND DISPLACEMENT Difference in 
position on film between picture and 
its accompanying sound. 35 mm. film 
sound is 20 frames ahead of its picture. 
16 mm. is 26 six frames ahead. 

SOUND TRACK That portion of 16 or 
35 mm. film that is devoted to the re- 
cording of sound. 



SOUR 



1) Any off-pitch voice or in- 



strument that fails to come up to ex- 
pectations. (2) A TV show of poor 
quality in content or talent. 

SPACE STAGING To plan or place 
scenes advantageously so that camera 
and mike coverage can be easily han- 
dled in one studio or by a limited num- 
ber of cameras. 

SPECIAL EFFECTS Miniatures, diara- 
mas, and various electrical and me- 
chanical devices used to simulate im- 
pressive backgrounds, massive titles, 
etc. Any trick device used to achieve 
scenic or dramatic effects impossible 
of actual or full-scale production in 
the TV studio. 

SPECIAL EVENTS TV programs of 
great news interest, usually not regu- 
larly scheduled, e.g., sporting events, 
meetings, parades, Senate crime hear- 
ings, MacArthur's arrival, etc. 

SPECS Short for "specifications," the 
dimensions and/or cost of set, back- 
ground, etc. to be used on TV show. 

SPELL A LINE or SPELL AN ACTION 

To deliver an action or a line meticu- 
lously accenting each movement and/ 
or enunciating clearly. 

SPIEL or SPIELER The commercial and 
the announcers or talent who deliver 
the commercial. 

SPILL Light or glare overflowing from 
one scene or set to another to destroy 
light balance. 

SPLAYED Flats, lights, props, etc. set 
at an acute angle, rather than parallel 
with the background in a TV set. 

SPLICE To join together two pieces of 
film with film cement; also the joint 
itself. 

SPEED il) Amount of light trans- 
mitted on camera lens. < 2 > Speed film 
passes through projector; two normal 
speeds, or 16 frames per second for 
silent; 24 frames per second for sound 
film. TV film is usually projected 24 
frames per second and electronically 
upped to 30 frames per second in the 
TV system. 

SPLIT FOCUS Adjusting the focus of 
TV camera midway between two sub- 
jects when one is in foreground and 
other in the rear. Usually done in two- 
shots to give both subjects equal dra- 
matic value. 

SPLIT-SCREEN PROCESS Also called 
split frame. Process used in making a 
shot of an actor playing a dual role. 
In films the shot is made in two 
phases. In the first, part of the frame 
area is masked, the actor playing his 
first role in such a position as to regis- 
ter on the exposed portion of the film. 
In the second, exactly this exposed 
part is masked, and the actor plays 
his second role so as to register in the 
remaining portion, now exposed. The 
two combined give the desired effect. 
In TV this effect is usually accom- 
plished with the aid of superimposures, 
dissolves, overlaps, and mirrors. 

SPONSOR 



1 



SPONSOR One of the 100,000 or more 
advertisers in America who use TV 
and/or radio to acquaint and sell the 
public their individual products and 
services. 

S.I. or SPONSOR IDENTIFICATION Al- 
so sponsor identification index < S.P.I. I . 
Percentage of regular and/or irregu- 
lar viewers of a TV show or personal- 
ity who can identify the name of the 
sponsor or are familiar with specific 
data about the product advertised on 
TV. 

SPOT (1) Individual television spot- 
lights directed on a restricted stage 
area or subject. <2> Specific TV time 
segments available or purchased for 
the airing of a sponsored show or com- 
mercials. 

SPOT TV Market -by -market buying 
of TV time < programs, announcements, 
participations, station breaks). This 
method of using TV affords flexibility 
in adapting a TV ad campaign to time 
zone, seasonal variations, special mer- 
chandising plans, etc. 

SPOTLIGHT Lamp capable of project- 
ing narrow beam of bright light onto 
a small area, used in highlighting. 
(See lighting.) 

SPREAD (1) An elastic period of time 
that allows for any increase in the 
pace of a TV performance. For ex- 
ample, if a half hour, or to be specific, 
a 29-minute, 30-second show timed 
29:10 on the dress rehearsal, the 20 
seconds' difference is the spread. <2> 
To stretch any part of a broadcast for 
the purpose of filling the full allotted 
time of the program. 

SPROCKET HOLE Small hole punched 
at regular intervals along film to en- 
gage with the sprocket teeth in cam- 
era, projector, etc. 

SQUEAK STICK Clarinet player. 

STAGING DIRECTOR Puts movement 
into uninteresting TV shows; stream- 
lines action. 

STAGE SPACING Referring to correct 
distance between talent and props 
when they appear in set and on cam- 
era. 

STAGING COORDINATOR (1) Super- 
visor of production facilities on indi- 
vidual program. <2) In charge of con- 
struction, transfer and assembly of 
settings, and all mechanical and physi- 
cal materials. (3) Is directly respon- 
sible for operation of carpentry and 
property personnel. (4) Has responsi- 
bilities comparable to those of the 
stage manager in the theatre with re- 
gard to all aspects of the program with 
the exception of talent. 

STAGING PLAN or BLOCKING A scaled 
print or plan of the studio or stage 
floor upon which are recorded the lo- 
cation of walls, settings, doorways, 
furniture, sound effects, orchestra, the 
disposition of various properties, and 
working areas. The "staging plan" is 



a pre-requisite to all developments, 
scenic execution, set dressings, and 
camera movement planning and is 
used by the producer-director to plot 
physical action and business prior to 
rehearsals in the actual setting. 

STAND BY Cue to talent, cast or crew 
that TV program is about to go on the 
air. Also substitute TV show, whether 
dramatic, musical, or commentary, 
which is relied upon as an emergency, 
when allotted time for a show already 
on air has not been filled. 

STANDBY or SAFETY A second TV film 
or recording I original > , usually made 
simultaneously with original. To be 
used for duplication should original be 
lost, damaged, etc. 

STAR Actor or actress whose appear- 
ance in the principal TV role may be 
regarded as one of the main requisites 
for the show's acceptive or commercial 
success. 

STAR MAKER Also called string bean. 
The long, thin, small RCA mike simi- 
lar to Altec tiny mike. 

STATION BREAK (1) Interval between 
programs, usually at V\, Vz, or % of 
an hour. <2> A cue given by a station 
originating a program to network sta- 
tions signalling that it is time for in- 
dividual stations to identify themselves 
to local audience. 

STATION REP An organization or in- 
dividual acting as an agent on a fee 
or percentage basis to sell a station's 
time to potential sponsors. 

STEP IT UP Increase the volume of 
the mikes or pace or tempo of a show, 
its action or its music. Note the dif- 
ference from pick it up or increase in 
tempo. 

STET A proof-reading term meaning 
to let stand as originally written, and 
to disregard the mark-outs. To stet a 
cut is to return it to the script. 

STICK A PIN IN IT Instruction for 
"The final camera rehearsal was per- 
fect: there will be no changes before 
the air show." 

STICK WAVER The musical director 
or orchestra leader. 

STILL ilt Photograph of a scene from 
a show or of the show's leading per- 
sonality or of some aspect of produc- 
tion. »2> Any still photograph or oth- 
er illustrative material that may be 
used in a TV telecast. 

STING or STINGER A sharp and em- 
phatic music accent or cue to empha- 
size the visual action. 

STOCK SHOT A scene not taken espe- 
cially for the production but from film 
files or film library, i.e., Eiffel Tower, 
Statue of Liberty, frequently inserted 
for atmosphere. iSee cut, top of next 
column.) 

STOP Size of the iris in TV camera 
lens, which is adjustable to admit more 
or less light. 




STOP MOTION Film taken by expos- 
ing one frame instead of a number of 
frames at a time. Object or objects 
are usually moved by hand a fraction 
of an inch for each exposure according 
to a predetermined pattern. 

STOP THE SHOW Applause or laugh- 
ter from a live or studio audience 
that's so prolonged that the planned 
TV events are obliged to halt momen- 
tarily. 

STORY, SCRIPT or SCENARIO EDITOR 

Manager of TV department responsi- 
ble for finding, selecting, and adapting 
stories suitable for use by the individ- 
ual sponsor, station, network, etc. 

STORY BOARD A set of drawings used 
to show sequence of a TV idea, show, 
announcement, film, etc. Idea being 
to have one drawing for every change 
of action or scene, usually including 
both pictures and script. 

STRAIGHT READING Delivering or 
reading material or lines naturally, 
without undue emphasis or character- 
ization. 

STRAIGHT UP TV show is on the nose 
— timed perfectly. 

STRETCH Instruction given to cast or 
crew to slow down pace of show to 
consume time. 

STRIKE or STRIKE IT To dismantle or 
take down set, props, etc. and to re- 
move it from the area. 

STRIP SHOW A serial TV show such 
as One Man's Family, after "strip," 
or serial cartoons. 

STRIPS Vertical light strips. 

STUDIO A building especially con- 
structed for the production of TV or 
radio shows, which in its construction 
embodies all electrical accommoda- 
tions, acoustical elements, etc., and is 
suitably equipped with lights, cameras, 
microphones, grid, etc.. and one or 
more associated control rooms. 

STUDIO or STAGE DIRECTIONS Always 
given in terms of the talent's right 
and left as he is standing or seated or 
as he faces the TV camera. 

STUDIO COORDINATOR Station indi- 
vidual who combines and directs all 
non-engineering efforts and work. 

STUDIO MOTHERS Mothers of juvenile 



30 JULY 1951 



49 



TV talent. Like stage mothers, only 
sometimes perhaps more so! 

STYLE To invite applause from live 




or studio audience with hand gesture, 
or holding up cards not seen on cam- 
era. 

SUB-TITLE Title inserted in a TV 
show or film to elucidate or advance 
the action or argument. 

SUPER-IMP, SUPER-IMPOSE or SUPER- 
IMPOSITION The overlapping of an 
image produced by one camera with 
the image from another camera. Both 
pictures being visible, but appearing 
finally as one picture. 

SUPER-SYNC A radio signal transmit- 
ted at the end of each scanning line, 
which synchronizes the operation of 
the television receiver with that of the 
television transmitter. 

SUPPLEMENTARY STATION One not 

included in the network's basic group. 

SURFACE NOISE CI) Caused on a TV 

set by dirt on floor, props, and furni- 
ture not secure, etc. i.2> Noise caused 
by the needle passing in the groove of 
a transcription. 

SWEEP I 1 1 Curved pieces of TV scen- 
ery. C2) Method by which one Balop 
card replaces another by gradually 
covering top to bottom, bottom to top. 
or from side to side. 

SWELL Direction to sound or music to 
momentarily increase volume. 

SWITCH or CUT A change from one 
camera, lens or camera angle to an- 
other. 

SWITCHER Electronic technician who 
sets the brightness and contrast of the 
image, and under the production di- 
rector cuts, fades, or dissolves, from 
one picture to another. 

SWIVEL THE BOOM To move boom 
off its axis to one side or another. 
Used when it is not practical to dolly 
or truck. Term usually applies to Fear- 
less or Sanner dolly. 

SYNC (1) Slang for synchronization 
of two or more stations to one wave 
length. (2) The simultaneous ending 
of several shows so that all elements 
of a station or network are ready to 
go with the next forthcoming show. 
1 3 ) When both the horizontal and 
vertical scanning at the receiver is in 



50 



step with the scanning at the pick-up 
camera. <.4> To adjust the sound- 
track of a film to the picture in edit- 
ing so that whenever the source of a 
reproduced sound is shown visually on 
the screen, the time relationship be- 
tween sound and picture appears natu- 
ral. ». 5 ^ To secure in projection the 
relationship between the sound and 
picture of a film or kine intended by 
its makers. * 6 ^ To maintain synchron- 
ic perfection between the scanning mo- 
tions of the electron beams and the 
camera tube and in the cathode ray 
tube in the receiver or monitor. 

SYNC ROLL Vertical rolling of a pic- 
ture on transmitted signal usually on 
switch-over to remote pickup when 
circuits at studio and remote are not 
synchronized. 

SYNOPSIS (1) First stage of TV com- 
mercial, program or story written in 
action sequences, but without full 
technical data, directions of the con- 
tinuity, or script. (2) A summary of a 
completed TV show prepared for pub- 
licity purposes. 

SYNTHETIC DISTORTION To impart 
by various techniques a seeming irreg- 
ularity to lines and surfaces that are 
actually smooth and rectangular. 



TAG LINE The final speech of a TV 
scene or play exploding the joke, or 
the climax speech resolving the scene, 
play or commercial to its conclusion. 

TAKE CI) Single shot picture or scene 
held by TV camera. (2) Such a scene 
so televised or filmed. (3) Command 
to switch directly from one picture or 
camera to another picture or camera, 
as "ready one, take one." "ready two. 
take two." <4> Instruction to switcher 
to feed a given picture channel to 
transmitter. C5) Reaction or sudden 
obvious realization by talent on cam- 
era. 

TAKE IT AWAY Directions to station, 
network, talent, announcer, etc. 
"You're on the air." 

TAKE TIMINGS To time each unit of 
a show, spot, etc. by stopwatch. 

TAKING A BALANCE Preliminary test- 
ing of various sounds in a program to 




determine their relation to one an- 
other. 

TALENT COST Expense or cost (for 
music, talent. etc> of a show aside 
from the time charge. 

TALENT SCOUT Person employed to 
search for potential talent, actors, for 
TV station, network, or show. 

TALK BACK (1) Phone circuit, ear- 
phones, or cans from director to TV 
crew. (2) Loudspeaking device between 
studio control room and studio enabl- 
ing producer to give directions to cast 
during rehearsals. (3"> Telephone fa- 
cility used to permit remote originat- 
ing point to hear predetermined cues 
and thus enable foolproof switches to 
be performed. 

TALKING DOWN Talent acting or 
speaking in an aloof, superior man- 
ner, or so it seems to viewers. 

TALKING IN HIS BEARD Speaking in 
a muffled, almost indistinguishable, 
voice. 

T.C. Short for transcontinental. 
Means a network show that reaches 
from coast to coast. 

TEARS Horizontal disturbance in TV 
picture caused by noise which makes 
picture appear to tear apart. 

TEAR JERKER TV show with a sad or 
pathetic appeal. CBS-TV's Mama 
sometimes fits this category. 

TEASER Strip of muslin or set ma- 
terial above set to prevent camera from 
shooting over into lights or grid. 

TECHNICIAN Skilled worker in any 
branch of TV production, direction, 
engineering. 

TD or TECHNICAL DIRECTOR Director 
of all technical facilities and opera- 
tions, lighting, cameras, sound, switch- 
ing in a studio, and frequently remote 
production. 

TELECAST A television broadcast, pro- 
gram, or show. 

TELECINE Equipment used by British 
BBC to televise films. Much larger 
than U. S. equipment but much quiet- 
er in operation. Film moves in con- 
tinuous motion instead of intermit- 
tently, reducing wear on film. 

TELEFEX Excellent rear projection 
system for special effects, background, 
etc. One of most realistic devices in 
rearview projection. 

TELEGENIC Object, talent, anyone or 
anything that looks well on television. 

TELEPHOTO LENS Very narrow angle 
lens of great focal length which pro- 
duces large size images at extreme dis- 
tances, frequently used at sporting 
events, etc. 'See lenses. ) 

TELEPROMPTER A rolling script de- 
vice for talent who have difficulty in 
learning lines. Also called idiot sheet. 
Lines are printed large enough to be 

SPONSOR 



I 




MAY 1951 



HOOPER T£L£V/S/ON AUDIENCE INDEX 

SHARE OP TELEVISION AUDIENCE 



TIME 


TV 
SETS- 

IN- USE 


TV 

Station 

"A" 


TV 
Station 

»B" 


TV 
Station 


TV 

Station 


KTLA 


TV 

Station 

"E" 


TV 

Station 

"F" 


OTUEt 
TV 


EVENING 

SUN. THRU SAT. 

6:00 P.M.- 10:00 P.M. 


42.1 


14.1 


4.5 


11.8 


17.7 


* 
33.8 


8.8 


9.1 


0.1 






SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
12:00 NOON-6:00 P.M. 


24.1 


9.5 


4.5 


26.9 


4.4 


* 
44.5 


0.8 


10.4 


- 


SATURDAY DAYTIME 
8:00 A.M.-6:00 P.M. 


9.7 


13.1 


- 


26.7 


2.7 


59.3 


1.8 0.9 


0.5 



*/ 

*l 

*\ 



c&**> 



KTLA 



* 



Paramount TPl 



1,038,750 TV Receivers in Los Angeles area, May 1, 1951 



KTLA Studios • 5451 Marathon St., Los Angeles 38 • HOIIywood 9-6363 
Eastern Sales Office • 1501 Broadway, New York 18 • BRyant 9-8700 



KEY STATION OF THE PARAMOUNT TELEVISION NETWORK 



PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 




read at distance on sheet which re- 
volves, keeping pace with the show's 
action. 

TELEVIEWER Member of the televi- 
sion audience. 

TELEVISE or TELECAST To transmit a 
picture electronically by using televi- 
sion equipment. 

TELEVISION The transmission and re- 
production of a view, scene, image or 
person by an apparatus that converts 
light rays into electrical impulses in 
such a manner that those same ob- 
jects may then be transmitted and re- 
converted by a receiver into visible 
light rays forming a picture. 

TELEVISION GRAY SCALE Resolution 
of colors in scenery, costumes, and per- 
formers' faces into corresponding gray 
values in black-and-white TV. Has a 
shorter contrast range than other 
photographic media. May vary from 
five-step gray scale (white, light gray, 
medium gray, dark gray, and black) 
to more sensitive brilliance of the vari- 
ous gray values, depending upon light 
source and equipment factors, to ap- 
proach the 10-step transition (from 
white through grays to black) of pho- 
tographic and printing gray scale. 
<See gray scale.) 

TELOP An opaque slide. < 1 1 Used in 
gray telop. Used a great deal in CBS- 
TV stations. (2) Card for titles; shot 
live. 

TEMPO 1 1 » Relative speed or pace of 
performance or music. <2> Impression 
of speed which a show makes on view- 
er, either by succession of incidents or 
of shots, or by the rate of movement 
shown or rhythm sound. 

TEST PATTERN Specially made design 
of lines and/or circles transmitted for 
the purpose of correctly setting focus 
and tuning of an image on TV screen. 
Also used for station identification. 

TEXTURE An impression of depth and 
irregularity that is given to a plane 
surface by using paints or other deco- 
rative materials. 

THE TIP Viewing audience. "Holding 
the tip" means holding your audience. 

THEME Subject or central idea spe- 
cially composed or particularly apro- 
pos tune or music that identifies a 
specific program. Garroway's theme is 
"Sentimental Journey"; the theme for 



the Lone Ranger is the "William Tell 
Overture." 

THICK When individual sou»ds or in- 
struments in orchestra are not distin- 
guishable. 

"THIRTY" Sign-off signal used in 
early radio to signify the end of a pro- 
gram; derived from the classic teleg- 
rapher's sign-off. Used very little in 
TV. 

THREAD To lace first few feet of reel 
of film through projector or other film 
mechanism in order that film is ready 
to be shown. 



THREE SHOT 

formers, etc. 



TV shot of three per- 



THROW Distance from film projector 
to screen. 

THROW A CUE Visual hand signal 
usually pointing at talent to begin ac- 
tion or speech. 

THROW IT AWAY ( 1 ) To give line in 
casual and offhand manner. (2) To 
speak without obvious emphasis or ex- 
pression. (2) Order to talent or engi- 
neers to fade picture or dialogue no 
matter what script says. 

TIGHT < 1 ) Close shot using narrow 
angle lens 90-135 mm. <2> Show which 
in rehearsal times a few seconds over 
allotted time, and should either be cut 
or played rapidly, provided the mate- 
rial permits rapid treatment. 

TIGHTEN UP, CLOSER SHOT, LOOSEN 
UP, MORE DISTANT SHOT Terms used 
from director to cameramen when ob- 
ject is framed to obtain precise shot 
desired. 

TILT UP Direction for camera move- 
ment, up. 

TILT DOWN Direction for camera 
movement, down. 

TIME Period on the air available for 
a given spot or show. 

TIMEBUYER (1) Individual in adver- 
tising agency responsible for making 
the proper selection of TV or radio 
coverage to meet needs of advertiser. 
(2) Buyer of TV or radio spots, shows, 
etc. 

TIME CHECK Vital command to syn- 
chronize all watches of all concerned 
in telecast or broadcast. 

TIMING Time intervals written in on 
a script during last rehearsal indicat- 
ing where the performance should be 
in relation to the allotted or elapsed 
time of the show. 

TITLE (CREEPING TITLE) A title usu- 
ally on drum roll that moves up the 
screen at reading pace. 

TITLE MUSIC Background music 
behind opening and/or closing titles 
and introductions. 

TITLES or TITLE SLIDES <D Cards, 
film, slides, either drawings, printed 
or on film which announce the title 



and credits of a program. (2) Any 
written or printed matter introduced 
into show or film for its own sake and 
not as part of presentation. 

TONGUE To move a camera mounted 
on a boom in a horizontal direction 
left or right while panning to com- 
pensate for this motion. 

TOTAL AUDIENCE The percentage of 
TV homes viewing a specific show at 
some time during the telecast. 



TOWN CRIER 

loudly. 



Vocalist who sings too 



T.R. — T.L. Opposite of pan. Keep 
camera steady, move tripod or dolly. 

TRANSCRIPTION A recording of the 
highest quality, usually at 33% r.p.m. 
especially made for telecast or broad- 
cast. 

TRANSIT CASE Travelling case for 
reels of 16 mm. or 35 mm. film with 
metal can and plywood case to meet 
the requirements of the railway com- 
panies. 

TRANSITION To change or move from 
one action, set, or scene to another by 
music, pause, narration, black screen, 
dissolve, etc. 

TRANSPARENCY Photography or art- 
work on translucent material, usually 
35 mm. film, frequently backlighted. 
Opposite of opaque. <See slides.) 

TRAVEL or TRUCK SHOT When the 
director wishes the camera to move in 
a direction parallel to the set, he in- 
structs the cameraman to travel or 
truck right or left. (See truck.) 

TRAVELLER Loose scene, backdrop, 
or curtain, adjustable on pulleys. 

TRAVELOGUE Actuality film of life 
and scenes in other countries; travel 
film. 

TREATMENT Intermediate step be- 
tween synopsis and script where com- 
plete TV story, commercial, or produc- 
tion is finished. 

TRICK SHOTS or TRICK FILM To de- 




Ottfi 



pend mainly on the representation, 
through special manipulation of the 
technical processes of production, dis- 
solves, superimpositions, opticals, of 
situations and events which would in 
reality be impossible, such as a cyclist 
riding up the side of a house, or a 
magic horse flying through the air. 



52 



SPONSOR 



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DAYTIME 
PROGRAMMING 
-Hundred* of ^ * 

$$$ and ^0^ 
Success stones 
in our Piles 



WT(/J 

Represented bq Ffc€£ & PETERS 




TRIM Facing around a TV set open- 
ing such as a door or window. 

TRIPOD A three-legged TV camera 
mount. Cheapest, least desirable type, 
usually used in remotes. 

TROLLEY or DOLLY Wheeled vehicle 
on which camera can be moved in tak- 
ing a shot. 

TRUCK or TRUCKING SHOT Camera 
technique by which single talent up to 
a line of performers <a chorus, for in- 
stance* or a scene is covered by dolly- 
ing the camera along the line of sub- 
jects or along the scene while the cam- 
era is on the air. 

TRY OUT For definition, see audition. 

TURKEY Flop or failure. No good. 

TURN OVER To relinquish control at 
close of one show to the stage hands, 
engineers, etc. of the succeeding show. 

TURN TABLE The rotating platform 
on which transcriptions are spun to 
play. 

TURN-TABLE TOM TV director who is 
more interested in his audio effects 
• speech, music, etc.i than in visual 
effects. 

TURRET or RACK Mounting for one 
or more camera lenses to permit rapid 
change of lens by rotating the turret 
to place the required lens in use. 

TV DIRECTOR Person responsible for 
every detail of show, including an- 
nouncer, cameramen, shots, audio en- 
gineers, stage managers, stage hands, 
talent, musicians, and soundmen. He 
builds and shapes the program by 
bringing all these factors into har- 
mony. He may make corrections and 
any revisions he deems desirable in 
show or script whenever he feels such 
are necessary for improved show. On 
his shoulders rests the complete re- 
sponsibility for quality of programs. 

TVA All-inclusive television talent 
union which usually includes AGVA, 
AFRA, etc. 

TVR CBS-TV abbreviation of televi- 
sion recording for term commonly 
called kinescope film by NBC-TV. 

TWIST Unusual or surprise ending to 
a story. O. Henry stories have a twist 
ending. 

TWO-SHOT Close shot of two persons 
with camera as near as possible while 
still keeping them both in shot. 

TWX Pronounced "twix" and means 
a teletype or teletype message. 

TYPE (D Actor suited to specific 
kind of part. (2) To limit an actor to 
one kind of role. 



U 







of soi C ^ e « 

SOOTH PALM «£. 
"OUVIVOOD 



S*ANN£ L 4 



M MM( 






.**** 



a 



UNDER at TV show that does not 
use all its allotted time. <2» Show that 



y Jt£* 

NIGHTTIME 
PROGRAMMING 

£ WJ 4 NETWORKS' 
Represented b H fRff *W€!« 



30 JULY 1951 



53 



JEFFERSON STANDARD 
BROADCASTING COMPANY^ 










CABLE 
/ TELEVISION 
FOR 

3 



CAROLINIANS 



Winston -Salem • North Carolina 

North Carolina's second city, home 
of Camel cigarettes, manufacturing 
and educational center, with an 
annual industrial payroll of 
58 million dollars. Winston-Salem 
receives television service from 
2 stations but 56% of viewers 
tune most often to WJ5TV, Charlotte. 




REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 
BY RADIO SALES 



runs short and calls for the use of 
padding, fill, or cushion. (3) To sus- 
tain and subordinate one facet of the 
drama or situation under another. 

UNDERPLAY Talent performing in a 
very restrained manner. 

UNIONS Detailed definitions are de- 
fined under specific letters. There are 
more than 13 different unions in NBC- 
TV. Major ones: 
IATSE. . .Stagehands 
NABET . .Engineers, cameramen, etc. 
BPDPA . .Scenic artists 
IBEW . . .Engineers and soundmen 
RTDG . . . Radio Television Directors 

Guild 
TWG . . . .Television Writers Guild 
AFRA . . .TV talent, announcers 
AGVA . . .TV talent, singers, etc. 
TVA All TV talent, actors, etc. 

UP STAGING Camera hog. To attempt 
to hold dominant position in scene at 
the expense of other performers. 



V 



VAULT Film store or storage for in- 
flammable film, meaning most 35 mm., 
of such construction and dimensions as 
to comply with the regulations of the 
local authority or of the home office. 

VARIABLE FOCUS LENS Lens whose 
focal length can be altered during 
shooting, as Zoomar, where mechan- 
ism changes distance between front 
and rear components of the lens. 

VAUDEO Vaudeville show on televi- 
sion, a la James Melton, Ed Sullivan 
shows. 

VI or VOLUME INDICATOR Meter in 
control room which registers show's 
sound volume, thus enabling the tech- 
nicians to "see" the amount of sound. 

VIDEO From Latin meaning to see or 
I see. Pertains to the television broad- 
cast of images. Usually used as a noun 
to denote sight broadcasting as op- 
posed to sound broadcasting. Portion 
of TV signal that contains picture. 

VIDEO ENGINEER Engineer who con- 
trols picture quality and who may 
make switches from one camera to an- 
other as well as producing visual ef- 
fects such as fades, dissolves, super- 
imposures, etc. Usually engineer mon- 
itors the visual portion of a telecast. 

VIDEO GAIN Dial or apparatus which 
controls power of picture amplifier. 
By turning video gain down you get 
fade out; turn video gain up and you 
have fade in. 

VIDEO SIGNAL or PICTURE SIGNAL 

Portion of signal from TV camera that 
is the electrical counterpart of the 
scene televised. 

VIEWER A machine used to examine 
TV film for editing or cutting. (See 
moviola.) 

VIEWING LENS Lens on TV camera 



used by the cameraman to view field 
of action. 

VIEWS Sometimes called sets or situ- 
ations. Scenes being televised. 

VIGNETTE Mask placed before cam- 
era lens to produce a picture in which 
only the center part is visible in dif- 
fused oval, circle, etc. 

VISTASCOPE An optical device con- 
tained in a simple, box-like case which 
fits snugly in front of the lens of any 
television or film camera. Through its 
use and an 8" x 10" picture of scene 
desired, live actors performing on a 
bare stage or in an open field can be 
presented to a television or film audi- 
ence, either "live" or by means of film 
in what appear to be settings dupli- 
cating any structure or scenic site in 
the world required by the show's locale 
and script. The effect is created by 
illusion, of course. Actors may sit "on" 
terraces which actually are only pho- 
tographs, may walk "through" doors 
or "behind" trees or posts, which again 
are merely photographic reproductions. 
Vistascope is leased through Vista- 
scope Corporation of America, RKO, 
Culver City, Cal. 

VISUAL GAG Comedy routine or sound 
effect to produce laughs on a TV or 
live audience show. Gag has to be seen 
rather than heard, as Sid Caesar and 
Imogene Coca on Saturday Night Re- 
view, NBC-TV. 

VISUAL SHOW TV or radio show 
which is presented before an actual 
audience. Called "live." 

VO or VOICE OVER (1) Narration type 
recording as opposed to lip sync or 
live sound. (2) Voice over narration 
where voice talent is not seen. 

VOX POP A spootaneous radio or TV 
interview. 




VSI Visual station identification, as in 
test pattern, etc. 



W 



WAITS (1) Unwanted pause caused 
by a talent missing his pickup cues, or 
technical equipment failures which re- 
sult in a non-picture or sound period 
(2) Actor or music deliberately hold- 



54 



SPONSOR 



ing off on their cue in order not to 
smother existing laugh on a comedy 
show. 

WALK-THROUGH REHEARSAL May be 

same as dry rehearsal, or preceding 
first dry rehearsal. 

WALL TREATMENT Technique used 
to simulate numerous surfaces on the 
walls of a set such as wallpaper, bricks, 
stucco, etc. 

WALLA WALLA Ad lib mumble re- 
peated over and over in crowd scenes 
to sound like a mob. 

WARM UP Usually a three or five- 
minute period immediately preceding 
broadcast in which announcer, m.c, 
or talent puts the studio audience in a 
receptive mood by amiably introduc- 
ing the cast of the program, discussing 
its problems, sponsor, etc. 

WARNING LIGHTS Red and green 
lights associated with each studio cam- 
era to warn cameramen and perform- 
ers that camera is about to go on the 
air (green light) , sometimes called the 
preview light; or that camera is on 
the air (red light). 

WATT Measure of transmitting pow- 
er of TV station. 

WEAVER TV talent who moves about 
nervously in front of the camera. 

WEB Slang for TV network, like net. 

WEST OF DENVER Technical troubles 
which can't be located. 

WESTERN Type of American film de- 
voted to cowboys and horses; usually 
set in real surroundings and contain- 
ing chases, etc. 

WHIP SHOT See zip pan. Very fast 
pan shot that usually blurs scene by 
speed of turning camera. Used for 
dramatic shift of interest or startling 
change of locale. 

WHODUNIT TV mystery program, a 
la Martin Kane, etc. 

WIDE ANGLE LENS Lens of very wide 
angle of projection, as 50 mm., which 
is used to pick up large portion of set, 
talent, audience, etc. at short distance. 

WILD (1) Film or picture taken to fit 
pre-recorded narration or sound. (2) 
A wing, flat, window, etc., which is 
used to shoot through or over and then 
struck immediately so as not to ham- 
per camera action. 

WIND IT UP (1) To increase tempo or 
pace. (2) To bring to a climax or 
finish. 

WINGS (1) Off-stage entrance and 
storage space which may be masked 
from camera or live audience. (2) 
Wing flat that is a hinged book flat 
which stands without support. 

WIPE Transition from one scene or 
image to another in which new scene 
slowly replaces old one in some grad- 
ually increasing geometric pattern, 



i.e., circle (circle in, circle out) , square 
(expanding square), fan, roll, etc. In 
a horizontal wipe the action is from 
the side of the picture. In a fan wipe 
it is semi-circular. 

WIPE OVER Optical film or printing 
effect by which one scene or image 
moves into another geometrically. (See 
overlap, etc.) 

WOOD PILE Xylophone, or an xyloph- 
onist — musician. 

WOOD SHED (1) A hard, tiring re- 
hearsal. (2) When a performer pri- 
vately rehearses his part outside the 
studio or off camera. (3) A musical 
director who makes an ad lib arrange- 
ment of a number during rehearsal by 
verbal rather than written instruc- 
tions to orchestra or singers. 

WOOF (1) TV slang signifying "on 




the nose" or "okay." (2) Sound used 
to synchronize time, i.e., "I'll give you 
a 'woof at 8:15:30." "Ready 'woof.'" 
(3) Word spoken into mike to check 
amplitude and/or time of sound, i.e., 
1,2,3,4 woof. 

WOMP A quick flare-up of light or 
brightness in a TV picture. 

WORKPRINT Film print (frequently 
a rush) used in editing and cutting to 
determine the final composition of the 
finished film, show, commercial, etc. 



YAK A lot of talk usually classified 
as unnecessary. 

YUK Slang term for a big laugh. Berle 
is interested in big yuks. 



ZAMPA Florid musical passage with 
plenty of brass — blown big and bitten 
off sharp. 

ZILCH Standard name used to de- 
scribe anyone who walks into TV stu- 
dio and whose name is not known. 

ZIP-PAN (1) Effect obtained by swing- 
ing camera so quickly round from one 
point of rest to another, that between 
the two the picture is blurred. (2) De- 
vice for combining two different shots, 
the camera being swung so quickly 



HE'S HOOKED 
UP TO A 
BIG ONE! 



Yes, he's hooked up to more 
than 83,000 TV homes — he's a. 
wise time buyer who knows that 
KOTV reaches the heart of the 
Oil Capitol's Multi-million Dollar 
market. He also knows that 
KOTV's afternoon shows, lookin' 
at Cookin'; and Matinee Show- 
case are good spot participation 
programs. You'll make a good 
"catch" if you use KOTV, Tulsa's 
only TV station. (NBC, CBS, 
ABC, DuMont) 

GUcuutel 6 

First in Tulsa 



Cameron Television, Inc. 

302 South Frankfort 

Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Represented Nationally by 
EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



30 JULY 1951 



55 



from the subject in the first that it 
ends in a blur, and so quickly on to 
the subject in the second that it begins 
with a blur; the two blurred portions 
then being joined together to give the 
effect of a single zip-pan. 

ZOOM or ZOOM IN Used to describe 
the fast action of a smooth and con- 
tinuous change of focal length with 
dolly in, optical trick, Zoomar lens. 
Used very effectively on commercials 
where object starts small and zooms 
in to full screen view. 

ZOOM-LENS Lens of variable focal 
length. As in zoom or zoom in, name 
derives from fact that when the focus 
on subject is quickly increased dur- 
ing shooting, the effect on the screen 
is a rapid change from distant shot to 
near shot, giving the impression that 
the camera has "zoomed'* or swung to- 
wards the subject. 

ZOOMAR LENS Lens which makes it 
possible to follow action, keeping it in 
focus all the time. Range is from very 
close up to the full length of a foot- 
ball field. It has twenty-eight optical 
elements. Used mostly outdoors. Fo- 
cal lengths 5" to 22". F5.6 to F22. (See 
Elect ra Zoom and lenses .) 



'With the word 'ZOOMAR lens," 
sponsor completes Herbert True's 1951 
"TV Dictionary Handbook for Spon- 
sors." The appendix beloic gives Her- 
bert True's rating of the use value of 
various books on TV.1 



TV Bibliography 

It is most difficult at any time to 
evaluate a book in terms of its worth 
to someone else, but in television the 
job is even more difficult because the 
publication may be of interest to the 
reader for a variety of reasons. The 
reader may be an idea man, techni- 
cian, writer, director, administrator, 
etc. In his own respective field he may 
even encompass a multitude of TV du- 
ties or responsibilities. For that rea- 
son the author has reviewed the fol- 
lowing books, most of which were spe- 
cifically recommended by TV creators 
themselves, and has in a rather crude 
manner attempted to catalogue them 
according to potential interests. 

There were numerous other applica- 
ble TV books that have come to the 
author's attention, but the following 
works all seem to have definite value 
and superior merit in their coded 
fields, both from the knowledge and 
technical standpoints, and as helpful 
reference books. 

Code 

S — Superior; extremely current. Of 
great interest to all TV personnel, 
networks, stations, directors, film 
producers, large or small. The 
highest possible all-inclusive rec- 
ommendation. 

X — Extra creative. A priceless tool for 



writers, idea men, producers, etc.; 
anyone in the creative end of TV. 

L — Limited. While a major help to al- 
most everyone in the trade, it has 
particularly outstanding material 
for station personnel, talent, un- 
ions, individuals whose experience 
has been limited in scope and who 
desire to supplement it with relat- 
ed knowledge about agencies, spon- 
sors, other techniques in the field. 

C — College or newcomers to TV indus- 
try could profitably become very 
familiar with the information in- 
cluded in these publications; how- 
ever, this is not a limitation, rath- 
er a helpful breakdown for those 
concerned. 

D — Dated in some respects but con- 
tains enough valuable information 
to make it of primary use as indi- 
cated. 

S-X-C Advertising Handbook . by 
Roger Barton, Prentice-Hall 

L Advertisi?ig Procedure, by Otto 

Kleppner, Prentice-Hall 

L Basic Issues in Color Televi- 

sion, by Frank Stanton, Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting Co. 

X-L Best Television Plays of the 

Year, by William Kaufman. 
Merlin Press 

X-C Documentary Film, by Paul 

Rotha, Faber and Faber 

S-X-C Experiment in the Film, by 
Roger Manvell, Maemillan 

X-C Film Technique, by Vsevolod 

I. Pudovkin. Newnes 

S-C Films in Business and Indus- 

try, by Gibson, McGraw-Hill 

L-C FootJiotes to the Film, edited 

by Charles Davy. Lovat Dick- 
son 

C-D Getting a Job in Television. 

by John Southwell. McGraw- 
Hill 

S-C-X Here Is Television, by Thomas 
Hutchinson, Hastings House 

C-D How to Write for Television. 

by Douglas Allen, Dutton 

L-C Modern Radio Advertisi7ig 

(with analysis of TV advertis- 
ing* , by Charles Wolfe. Funk 
& Wagnalls 

S-X-C Movies for TV, by John Batti- 
son. Maemillan 

C Neivs by Radio, by M. V. 

Charnley. Maemillan 

S-X-C Painting with Light, by John 
Alton. Maemillan 

L-C Profitable Advertising in To- 

day's Media and Markets, by 
Ben Duffy, Prentice-Hall 

X-C Scenery Design for Amateur 

Stage, by Friederich and Fra- 
ser, Maemillan 

S-X-C Science Via Television, by 
Lynn Poole. Johns Hopkins 
Press 

X-C Successful Film Writing, by 

Seton Margrave. Methuen 

S-C Successful Radio and TV Ad- 

vertising, by Gene Seehafer. 
McGraw-Hill 

L Telecasting and Color, ill., by 

Kingdon S. Tyler, Harcourt 
Brace 



D-C-X Television, by Marcus G. 
Scroggie, Blackie and Sons, 
London 

L Television Broadcasting. Pro- 

duction, Economics, Tech- 
nique, by Lenox R. Lohr, Mc- 
Graw 

D-L Television Encyclopedia, ill., 

edited by Stanley Kempner, 
Fairchild 

D Television Engineering, Prin- 

ciples of, ill., by Donald G. 
Fink, McGraw 

C-L-D Television, Eyes of Tomorrow, 
by W. C. Eddy, Prentice-Hall 

L-D Television, How it Works, by 

Jeanne and Robert Bendick, 
McGraw-Hill 

C-X Television, Introduction to, by 

Robert and Hylander, Mae- 
millan 

C-X-D Television Primer of Produc- 
tion and Direction, by Louis 
A. Sposa. McGraw 

C-X-D Teleinsion Production Prob- 
lems, by John F. Royal, Mc- 
Graw 

S-C-X Television Programing and 
Production, by Richard Hub- 
bell, Rinehart 

S-X-C-D Television Show Business, by 
Judy Dupuy. General Electric 
Co. 

C Television Standards and 

Practice, by Donald G. Fink. 
McGraw 

S-X-C Television Techniques, by 
Hoyland Bettinger, Harper 

D Television, Today and Tomor- 

row, by Lee de Forest, Dial 
Press 

S-X-C Television Writing: Handbook 
of Principles and Practice, by 
Robert Greene, Harper 

S-X-C The Art of the Film, by Er- 
nest Lindgren, Geo. Allen and 
Unwin 

X The Art of Walt Disney, by 

Robert Field, Collins 

X-C The Cinema as a Graphic Art, 

by Vladimir Nilsen, Newnes 

S-X-C The Film Till Noiv, by Paul 
Rotha, Vision Press 

D The Miracle of Television, by 

S. H. Luther Gable, Wilcox 
and Follet 

L-X-C The Modern Law of Advertis- 
ing and Marketing, by Digges, 
Funk & Wagnalls 

L The Use of Television by Pub- 

lic Libraries. American Li- 
brary Publishing Co. 

S-X-C TV Production Pointers by 
Products. Special Effects, etc.. 
by Charles Batson, Broadcast- 
ing Advertising Bureau 

L-C-D Video Handbook, by Scherago 
and Roche. Boland and Boyce 



The WHOLE job in TV film 

spot-making at TELEFILM Inc. 

Producers since 1938. 

HOLLYWOOD (28) CALIFORNIA 



56 



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30 JULY 1951 



57 




WHY NOT A MEASURE 
OF IMPACT FOR RADIO! 

IN addition to con- 
tinuing reports in its 
radio and television 
markets, Pulse regu- 
larly does surveys of 
the buying habits of 
listeners and non 
listeners to selected 
programs. 

For example, consid- 
er the following sales 
impact of three pro- 
grams recently sur- 
veyed: 

NEWS PROGRAM 26% 

WOMAN'S SERVICE 
PROGRAM 96% 

"EARLY MORNING" . .60% 

FOR INFORMATION 
ABOUT PULSE 

ASK THE PULSE 

THE PULSE Incorporated 

15 West 46th Street 
New York 19, N. Y. 



CHAP STICK 

[Continued from page 25) 

next March. An estimated $150,000— 
a quarter of the total advertising ap- 
propriations — will be devoted to sell- 
ing Chap-ans and Chap Stick in 30 
cities over 35 radio stations. The num- 
ber of announcements normally used 
will be stepped up in 19 of the 30 mar- 
kets, and, says Gumbinner. "We may 
add four or five new stations to OU] 
list. Where remains to be seen, since 
we're still in our planning stage." 
(The other three-quarter slice of the 
total ad appropriations is used largely 
for slick magazines, like Holiday, Life 
and Look; trade magazines, like Drug 
Topics, in which the radio advertising 
is merchandised to druggists; and pos- 
ters and cardboard displays designed 
for the counters of retail outlets.) 

Chap Stick lip balm, which grosses 
about $1,750,000 a year, dominates its 
next biggest rival, Chesebrough Manu- 
facturing Company's Chesebrough Lip 
Ice. From October until March (via 
McCann-Erickson) Chesebrough spends 
"over $60,000" to participate in alter- 
nate weeks on Dr. Christian, CBS ra- 
dio. Chap Stick's other big competi- 
tor, Roger & Gallet's Lip Ade (via 
Hicks & Greist. New York) uses no 
broadcast advertising whatsoever. 

With regard to Chap-ans. which 
grosses an estimated $3,000,000 a year, 
Gumbinner says: "We simply have no 
competitors. In the men's hand cream 
realm. Chap-ans is the big explorer." 

Chap Stick first began exploring its 
masculine market during World War 
II. when the Government asked it to 
turn out a palliative to aid G.I.'s 
cracked, chapped, and weather-dried 
lips. Its Chap Stick lip balm soon be- 
came part of aviators' kits and was 
used heavily by troops in Alaska. 

"The second world war did for Chap 
Stick what World War I did for the 
wrist watch," says Paul Gumbinner. 
"Men were no longer ashamed to use 
them." 

Right after the war. Chap Stick 
tinned to producing its lip balm for 
the consumer market. Since women 
arc apt to use their ordinary lipstick 
to protect their lips, it was decided to 
direct the selling to men, and, to some 
extent, to children. 

Advertising for the lip balm, though, 
was restricted to the printed media. 
Only in 1948, when the company began 
manufacturing Chap-ans, was it decid- 
ed to push both products via radio. 



There were several reasons why Ad 
Manager Bond was prompted to let the 
Gumbinner Agency handle the account. 
First of all, it had experience in the 
drug trade, having guided Norwich 
Pharmacal Company through many an 
advertising crisis since 1930. Second- 
ly, it knew its business about radio, 
having introduced the famous vaude- 
ville team. Weber & Fields, to CBS for 
Webster Cigars as long ago as 1925. 

The decision proved sound. Law- 
rence Gumbinner, account supervisor, 
and Paul Gumbinner. account execu- 
tive, assisted by Erwin A. Levine, 
planned to give both products a radio 
test debut in the New York market. 
To get the male ear, announcements 
were scheduled over WCBS, immedi- 
ately after football games. These were 
then backed up by announcements over 
Jack Sterling's disk jockey show on 
WCBS. 

"The results were so darned good," 
says Paul Gumbinner. "that we knew 
radio was for us. And it was then we 
decided what broadcast formula we'd 
use — morning disk jockeys (to get the 
men before they go to work) and a 
few evening sports and news participa- 
tions (between 6:00 and 7:00 p.m., to 
get the men at the supper table.)" 

The company's wisdom in hopping 
into radio was confirmed next year, 
when it made a two-week sample offer 
over disk jockey shows on some 18 
stations. "Again the results were ex- 
traordinarily good," says Paul Gum- 
binner. "The average inquiry cost us 
12c — and in some cases as low as 3c. 
Home interviews conducted for us by 
Fact Finders Inc., and an analysis of 
the Nielsen Drug Index showed us that 
sales were very strong in those areas 
where we used radio. Besides, the 
company would get appreciative letters 
from druggists, saying, 'I see where 
disk jockey so-and-so is helping us sell 
your products. Keep up the good 
work. 

In buying announcements and par- 
ticipations over some 35 stations. Gum- 
binner is usually concerned with sev- 
eral points. His strategy runs some- 
thing like this: 

1. Use disk jockey shows with estab- 
lished audiences; shy away from the 
fledglings. 

2. Try to buy into a platter-spinning 
show in which the d.j. has a relaxed, 
rather than high-pressure, style. Then 
give him complete freedom to adapt 
the copy to his style. 

3. Use both large and medium sta- 



38 



SPONSOR 




What did your wife 
order from your store ? 



Did she ask for just any shirt . . . any old cigarettes . . . 
whatever candy you happened to have? 

Chances are 8 to 1 she named exactly the make 
she wanted! 

And if it happens in your own home, you can be 
sure it's going on all over town — all over America! 

Millions of wives have spent years trying the Brands. 
When they find their favorites they're loyal to 
them, buy them again and again. They know a famous 
manufacturer's name signed to his product 
guarantees top value, top quality, and satisfaction. 

Give your customers what they ask for — 

it's bad business to substitute 



That's why you make your business stronger when 
you keep the force of famous brand names behind your 
selling. Let your customers know they can get from 
you the brands they know and want. Why be content— 
or expect them to be content — with anything else? 

So isn't it just common sense to feature the 
merchandise that's overwhelmingly favored — the 
well-known Brands? It's your surest way to get steady 
demand, rapid turnover, and higher profits! 



INCORPORATED 

A non-profit educational foundation 
37 WEST 57 STREET, NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



30 JULY 1951 



59 



tions. A 50,000-watter. like WLS, and 
a 5,000-watter, like WIND. Chicago, 
both have distinct values. 

4. I se stations in those areas where 
the temperature would favor buying 
both products. For example, people in 
Minnesota arc too used to cold weather 
to require lip balms: therefore, use 
less advertising there. But Easterners, 
coming to Arizona and Colorado for 
their health, use lip balm heavily while 
they get adjusted to the drier climate; 
therefore, use plenty of radio advertis- 
ing in these two "health" states. 

5. Select stations near areas where 
Chap-ans and Chap Stick have their 
widest distribution. In the South, for 
example, even gasoline stations and 
hardware stores sell the two items. 

6. Favor those radio stations (like 
WFAA. Dallas, and WIBC. Indianap- 
olis ) which are usually prepared to 
merchandise the sponsor's shows to 
the trade with stickers and cards. 

"Business is so good at most of the 
top radio stations." says Gumbinner, 
"'that one of my biggest problems is 
getting availabilities. That's why I map 
out my autumn campaign well in ad- 
vance in the summer. A station like 
WFAA, Dallas, is usually sold out, and 



it's only as a special favor that they 
wangle an opening for me." 

Some typical stations that have done 
a high-octane selling job for Chap 
Stick and Chap-ans, according to Gum- 
binner. include: 

WAPI, Birmingham. Ala.; KHJ, Los 
Angeles; KGO, San Francisco; KOA. 
Denver; WRC, Washington, D. C; 
WMBR. Jacksonville, Fla.; WSB, At- 
lanta; KRNT, Des Moines; WFBR. 
Baltimore; WJR. Detroit; WBZ, Bos- 
ton; WDAF. Kansas City, Mo.; KSD, 
St. Louis; WAYS, Charlotte, N. C; 
KOIN, Portland, Ore.; WNOX, Knox- 
ville. Tenn.; WTAR, Norfolk, Va.; and 
WTMJ. Milwaukee. Also. WJZ, WCBS. 
WNEW, New York City; WCAE, 
Pittsburgh; WMPS, Memphis; KYW, 
WPEN. Philadelphia: WGAR, Cleve- 
land; WCKY, Cincinnati; WLS, Chi- 
cago. 

Commercial copy for both products 
is written by Paul Gumbinner and Er- 
win A. Levine. Their philosophy in 
composing the message has incorporat- 
ed these ideas: 

1. Try to relate the two products in 
a single commercial when possible. 
That is, an announcement for Chap-ans 
might well close with the throw-away 



WPAT 



made the largest strides of any radii, 

stat/on in the entire New York — New Jersey 

metropolitan area from 1950 to 1951. 

Total audience increase: more than 25'f 
(Strongest gains during prime evening TV time.) 

Proof of WPAT's dominant position and pulling 

fower in rich North Jersey** 

/'roof of outstanding remits for almost 

every type of advertiser in the N.Y.-N.J. market. 

The "'landing room only" sign is out. 

Based on these FACTS, WPAT announces, a 

substantial rate increase effective Sept. 10, 1951. 

See next Spoi/so i issue for one of the most 

remarkable radio sue, ess stories in the country — 

fat ts and figures, folks! 



*N.Y.-NJ. Pulse Jan.-Feb.-Mar. 1950-1951 
Send tor details 



WPAT 



rvrmsuN, N. J. 



5000 watts 930 kc 



phrase: "'Chap-ans is the hand cream 
packed with soothing, healing power — 
the one and only hand cream especial- 
ly made for men — created by . . . Chap 
Stick. America's most famous lip 
balm." 

2. Place a heavy emphasis on per- 
sonal testimonials, culled from letters 
written to the sponsor. A typical wife 
of an outdoor worker — auto mechanic, 
telephone lineman, truck driver, doc- 
tor — is quoted as saying: "Chap-ans is 
more important to my husband than 
his gloves." 

3. Although the Chap-ans sales 
stress is directed toward men ("comes 
in a handy masculine tube''), the an- 
nouncer lures in the women, too: 
"Here's a tip for you ladies. Buy your 
husband a tube of Chap-ans — and then 
borrow it back from him to get real 
relief for your own rough, chapped 
hands." 

4. While Chap Stick lip balm, too, 
aims its sales message primarily at the 
men. the rest of the family also is in- 
cluded in the sales appeal: "Just what 
the doctor ordered for dry smoker's 
lips and the uncomfortable lips of con- 
valescents ... I suggest your whole 
family cultivate the Chap Stick habit 
—and carry a personal Chap Stick all 
the time. Then whenever Dad, Mom. 
or the kids feel their lips getting 
rough. . . ." To strengthen this sales 
notion, the Gumbinner Agency shrewd- 
ly suggested to the company that each 
Chap Stick bear an individualistic sym- 
bol — a triangle, denoting the stick be- 
longed to Dad, a circle, show ing it was 
Mother's private stick, and so on. 

5. Finally, disk jockeys are encour- 
aged to relate the weather in local 
areas to the need of buying both prod- 
ucts. For example: "Temperature to- 
day — 12 above zero. You'll need Chap 
Stick for your lips; Chap-ans for your 
hands." 

Both the sponsor and the agency are 
devout believers in merchandising. Ad- 
vertisements in Drug Topics and The 
American Druggist I quite apart from 
consumer ads in Life, Look and Sat- 
urday Evening Post) inform the trade 
how the manufacturer is backing up 
the retailers' efforts with radio adver- 
tising. 

In addition, a handsomely illustrat- 
ed promotional folder is sent to drug- 
gists further disclosing the sponsor's 
radio campaign. It's headlined "Ra- 
dio of this special type will sell Chap 
Stick and Chap-ans to a waiting mar- 
ket. Il discloses market areas where 



60 



SPONSOR 



radio announcements are used; and 
details typical radio messages. 

As a final piece de resistance in pro- 
motion, the ad agency sends the disk 
jockeys a continuous series of encour- 
aging letters: 'We are promoting your 
show through the drug trade in your 
community. -Local druggists know that 
you'll be helping them to sell Chap 
Stick and Chap-ans and you can be 
sure they'll be listening with great in- 
terest. . . . You are the only radio ar- 
tist carrying the Chap Stick Com- 
pany's advertising in your area. So 
you can see, the results your show gets 
are extremely important to our plan- 
ning for next year. We want to come 
back for more!" 

The radio future of Chap Stick and 
Chap-ans seems fairly secure. The way 
matters stand now. the sponsor does 
not forecast the use of TV announce- 
ments in its advertising schedule. "The 
increasing high costs of TV are sim- 
ply too prohibitive for our pocket 
book," says Paul Gumbinner. "Radio 
has done a first-rate coverage job at a 
remarkably low price, and we'll con- 
tinue with it." 

In fact, Chap Stick is so exultant 
about radio's potency, that it may, next 
summer, give the air medium a true- 
blue test. The sponsor may try selling 
its two cold-weather products over the 
air during the dog days of July and 
August. Whether this plan remains 
only in the realm of speculation, like 
trying to sell refrigerators to Eskimos, 
will be seen. What is certain is that 
Chap Stick, which has managed to sell 
hand cream an